Youth & Education

Youth Unemployment
1:22 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

In Toughest Job Market Since WWII, An Uphill Climb For Teens And Young Adults

Nigel Wea, 22, speaks with one of the 80 prospective employers at Tuesday's "Jobfest," a job fair in Tacoma for 16 to 24 year olds.
Kyle Stokes KPLU

High school junior Marcus Hollman wants a job — "something to get me into the job market," he says. But he keeps running into the same words like a brick wall: "professional experience required."

"There are very few employers ready to accept someone with no previous experience," said Hollman, a student at Harrison Preparatory Academy, after attending a youth-oriented job fair in Tacoma on Tuesday.

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Youth Culture
1:49 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Seattle's Teen Poets To Face Off In Biggest 'Slam' Of The Year

Koha Farr, 19, practices performing one of his poems Thursday night. He's one of a dozen teen poets competing in Friday night's 'Grand Slam' at Town Hall Seattle.
Kyle Stokes KPLU

The night before Seattle's biggest competition of the year for the city's young slam poets, Koha Farr was understandably anxious.

"Ridiculously nervous," the 19-year-old competitive slam poet admitted after his Thursday evening practice. "But I'm ready. I'm ready for tomorrow."

Farr is performing at Town Hall Seattle in Friday night's "Grand Slam," in which teens who've qualified for this final competition will vie for a chance to represent the city at a national slam poetry festival.

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How We Learn
1:13 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Teacher Who Collected 7,000 Nerdy Science Songs Studying Their Teaching Power

University of Washington assistant professor Greg Crowther performs in "Money 4 Drugz," a music video about funding malaria research.
Gregory Crowther

Remember that biology chapter on how muscles contract? Probably not. But what if your professor had rapped it to you, or belted out the lesson to the tune of a popular song? 

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κρυπτοσ
12:11 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Contest Challenges Northwest College Students To Break Secret Code

Here's a challenge from the 2013 competition.
Central Washington University

Code language is probably as old as language itself. Now, two Northwest professors have launched a competition to test students’ code-breaking skills.

Called Kryptos, the competition is geared toward undergraduate students all around the Northwest. But the region’s high school students are also encouraged to try and break the codes.

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Youth & Sports
4:27 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

With No NBA Team In Sight, Investor Hansen Lends Arena Space To Nonprofit For Kids

A student in the A PLUS Youth Program gets ready to run a race. The organization offers after-school mentorship and academic tutoring in addition to youth sports programming.
A PLUS Youth Program Facebook

The space where billionaire investor Chris Hansen hoped to house Seattle's next NBA team will go to the kids, for now. 

Hansen will temporarily hand over the Sodo warehouse space to the A PLUS Youth Program, a nonprofit organization that offers athletic programming and after-school mentorship. 

The move couldn't come at a better time for the nonprofit, says its founder and executive director Tavio Hobson.

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Continuing Education
10:23 am
Wed April 2, 2014

UW To Offer New Online Degree In Social Sciences

kyle~ Flickr

The University of Washington is launching a new online degree in integrated social sciences aimed at people who want to complete their education.

The move is the university’s latest push into the competitive world of online education.

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Youth & Education
6:13 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Washington Students Begin Field Tests For New, Common Core-Aligned Statewide Exams

The online login screen for a practice exam from Smarter Balanced, a consortium developing tests aligned to new, nationally-crafted academic standards called the Common Core for use in 22 states.
Kyle Stokes KPLU

Students in more than 600 Washington state schools are beginning to take a new, potentially-tougher standardized test this week that will soon completely replace the state's current standardized tests.

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Youth & Education
12:37 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Seattle Schools To Use New State Funds To Avoid Planned Staffing Cuts

Mary Smith, an administrative secretary at Seattle's Ingraham High School, shows the button she wore last week to protest planned staffing cuts in district schools. Ingraham staff voted to reject their building budget.
Kyle Stokes KPLU

Following a cash infusion from the state and agitation from building-level staff, Seattle Public Schools administrators announced this week they won't be cutting staff members at schools after all.

Superintendent José Banda said the district will use the $8.3 million from the state Legislature's newly-passed budget to restore the equivalent of 50 assistant principals, counselors and clerical staff positions they had intended to eliminate next year.

"We intend to fully restore what was cut," Banda wrote in a district-wide email.

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Youth & Education
4:32 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Seattle Public Schools: Spike In Marijuana Use Not Just Seen At Roosevelt High

The rates at which Seattle high school students report using alcohol have dipped since 2008, but the district's lead substance abuse counselor suspects marijuana use has crept up since the last survey data came out in 2012.
KPLU

  Roosevelt High School has invited an expert on teen substance abuse to address concerned parents after the the school's principal sent a letter to parents about an increase in drug and alcohol use at the school. 

The letter by principal Brian Vance said the school's number of disciplinary incidents involving marijuana and alcohol use had "doubled" since last year, from 12 incidents to 24.

Seattle Public Schools officials say they've observed a similar trend district-wide.

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No Child Left Behind Act
5:00 am
Mon March 17, 2014

Where Fate Of Wash. State's Education Waiver Now Stands, And Why It Matters

President George W. Bush speaks at a school in Philadelphia in 2009, eight years after he signed it into law.
AP Photo J. Scott Applewhite

Washington state is at risk of losing nearly $40 million in federal funding after lawmakers left Olympia without passing a teacher evaluation bill.

Without the bill, the state failed to secure a waiver for an onerous requirement under the No Child Left Behind Act. As a result, the fate of federal funding for local preschool programs and extended day services now hinges on what federal education officials decide in coming months.

Here's an explanation of why the lawmakers didn't pass the bill, and where the complex issue now stands. 

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Youth & Education
4:14 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

Seattle Teachers Vote Down School Building Budgets In Protest Of Looming Staff Cuts

Mary Smith, an administrative secretary at Seattle's Ingraham High School, shows the button she wore Thursday to protest planned staffing cuts in district schools. Ingraham staff voted to reject their building budget this week.
Kyle Stokes KPLU

Teachers in 25 Seattle Public Schools have voted to reject their buildings' budgets for the next school year, and more may follow suit in the coming week.

Local teachers and union leaders coordinated the vote in hopes of forcing district officials to avoid cutting the equivalent of more than 50 full-time staff positions — clerical staff, assistant principals and school counselors — across the district's 95 schools. 

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Education
5:00 am
Mon March 10, 2014

UW Launches Minor In Arctic Studies

UW and Inuit students in the 2011 Jackson School Task Force on Arctic Sovereignty in Ottawa. Student interest in classes like this prompted the UW to launch an Arctic Studies minor
Nadine Fabbi

Curiosity about what’s happening in some of the coldest places on Earth has prompted the University of Washington to launch its first Arctic Studies minor.

The program is the first of its kind offered by a university in the lower 48. 

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Education
5:24 pm
Thu March 6, 2014

Inslee, Teachers' Union Clash Over Evaluation Measure

File photo. Washington Governor Jay Inslee has made the case for a controversial teacher evaluation bill.
biologycorner Flickr

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 3:12 pm

They supported his campaign, but now some unionized teachers in Washington have stern words for Governor Jay Inslee.

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Education
1:09 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

Optional Essay And Other Changes Coming To The SAT

They'll need new prep books.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 4:43 pm

  • NPR's Claudio Sanchez Discusses The College Board Announcement On 'All Things Considered'

The essay is optional. Scores will return to 1,600. And there will be no penalties if you answer something incorrectly. Those are the big takeaways from the SAT changes announced Wednesday.

The College Board said the revisions, the first updates to the college entrance exam since 2005, will take effect in 2016.

Other changes announced: Certain vocabulary words will be dropped in favor of those more commonly used in school and at work, and test-takers will have the option to take the SAT on a computer.

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Education
5:00 am
Wed March 5, 2014

Listen: At UW, A Science Fair For Schoolkids Features Human Brains And Spinal Cords

Human brains, sheep brains and human spinal cords were featured in hands-on exhibits at the "Brain Awareness Week" Open House at the UW.
Florangela Davila

Each March, scientists around the world host open houses to get people thinking about the brain.

The events are all part of Brain Awareness Week.

At the University of Washington, that means the mother of all science fairs in a room decked out with human brains, spinal cords, finch chirping and flying fruit flies.

Take an audio tour of an event that drew more than 650 elementary and high school students.

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