wolf management plan

A key state lawmaker says he'll hold a hearing on the state Fish and Wildlife Department's decision to kill a pack of wolves that had been preying on cattle in northeast Washington.

Another impact of Washington's wolves: Skinny cows

Oct 31, 2012

Washington ranchers who can show that wolves are making their cattle lose weight could get reimbursed under a new proposal. The rule before the Fish and Wildlife Commission would expand a compensation program for ranchers living in wolf country.

Washington’s cattle ranchers aren’t the first to complain about skinny livestock. Ranchers in Idaho and Oregon also say the reintroduction of wolves has made sheep and cattle move more and eat less.

That translates into the bottom line, says Dave Ware. He’s the game manager with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

OLYMPIA, Wash. - The director of Washington's Fish and Wildlife Department Friday said he hopes never again to have to order the killing of an entire wolf pack, as happened last month. In Olympia Friday, cattlemen and wolf lovers offered the agency radically different ideas for how to avoid a repeat. Correspondent Tom Banse reports.

Washington wildlife managers say the hunt for a pack of grey wolves is over. A state marksman killed the alpha male of the pack Thursday in far northeast Washington. The department has killed a total of seven wolves from the Wedge Pack since August.

However, emotions have run strong over the decision, and debate over wolf management in the Northwest will likely remain intense.

“We know these issues spark strong feelings among Washington residents across the state, which is why we are committed to conducting our business openly and transparently,” Washington Fish and Wildlife Director Phil Anderson said in a press release.

Alpha male wolf In Wedge Pack killed, ending state hunt

Sep 28, 2012

Washington wildlife managers say the hunt for a pack of grey wolves is over. A state marksman killed the alpha male of the pack Thursday in far northeast Washington. The department has killed a total of seven wolves from the Wedge Pack since August.

Wildlife managers believe the pack was responsible for killing or injuring at least 17 calves and cows in far northeastern Washington. Washington Fish and Wildlife Director Phil Anderson says the pack became dependent on livestock and would continue to attack them. But he says that didn’t make the decision any easier.

Wolf kills create blowback for state, conservation group

Sep 27, 2012

Washington wildlife officials killed three more grey wolves near the Canadian border Wednesday. That brings the total kill to five this week.

The state’s decision to take out an entire wolf pack is causing blowback for state wildlife managers –- and for one environmental organization that supported the action.

When you dial the main number for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the very first thing you hear might give you some indication of the level of public interest in the wolf issue.

Officials say two wolves have been killed by a state hunter flying in a helicopter in northeast Washington.

JOSEPH, Ore. — State biologists have identified a new wolf pack in northeastern Oregon.

Biologists spotted two gray-colored adult wolves and their litter of five pups last Saturday in the Upper Minam River drainage in the Eagle Cap Wilderness.

The Associated Press

SPOKANE, Wash. — Washington Fish and Wildlife officials say they've confirmed an eighth wolf pack in the state.

A Twisp, Washington man has changed his plea to guilty in a high-profile federal wolf poaching case. As part of a plea agreement, the 62-year-old man will not go to prison.

The lack of jail time greatly disappoints a conservation group.

Grisly photo adds fuel to wolf hunt debate

Apr 4, 2012

A photo of a trapped wolf in Idaho has splashed new fuel on the flames of the debate over wolves. Environmental groups say the image demonstrates what they see as the cruelty of wolf trapping in Idaho. But state and federal authorities say there was nothing illegal about the picture.

An anti-trapping group in Montana found the photo on a forum called Trapperman.com. In the background, you can see a wolf with one of its hind feet caught in a trap. The snow around the wolf has turned pink from blood. In the foreground a trapper smiles at the camera.

OLYMPIA, Wash. — People who think they've seen a wolf, heard one howl or found other evidence of wolves in Washington have a new place to share their story.

Pity the foolhardy wolf that gets in Liam Neeson's way. At least, that's the primary message in the trailer for the latest entry in this most curious period of the Oscar-nominee's career, which finds him more often than not furrowing his brow in anger and then beating the source of his ire to a bloody pulp.

COEUR D'ALENE, Idaho - The gray wolf is making its way deeper into Oregon, Washington, and now for the first time in almost 90 years, California. But where the wolf goes, emotions run high. Seventeen years after the re-introduction of gray wolves into Idaho, the subject continues to stir strong feelings in the state. Monday, wolf advocates in Coeur d'Alene held a full moon vigil to remember wolves killed by hunters.

"Do you have a candle yet?"

Washington's Fish and Wildlife Commission has approved a management plan for what one member called the most controversial and complex issue the Commission has ever dealt with: wolf management.

The number and distribution of breeding pairs in Washington's growing wolf population is key. The amended plan calls for four breeding pairs in Eastern Washington, four each in the North and South Cascades, and 3 more pairs anywhere in the state. If more are found, the plan calls for stepping up management actions, like moving wolves around or shooting animals who prey on cattle.

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