wildlife protection

Endangered species
5:56 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

5 Washington critters among species group would have feds protect

The Cascades Frog is among the 53 amphibians and reptiles in a petition for federal protection by the Center for Biological Diversity. Washington is considered one of its strongholds. It has declined by 50% in California.
Courtesy US Fish & Wildlife Service

They’re slimy and cold-blooded.

But conservationists say amphibians and reptiles are important indicator species – and some of the most endangered.

Five of these sensitive creatures that call Washington home are among more than 50 included in a petition for federal protection.

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Environment
10:41 am
Thu April 26, 2012

Mutant two-headed trout spur scrutiny of mine pollution

A study commissioned by the J.R. Simplot Company on selenium contamination in creeks in southeast Idaho includes photos of deformed Yellowstone cutthroat trout (top) and brown trout (bottom).
J.R. Simplot Idaho DEQ

SODA SPRINGS, Idaho - Here’s an image you usually don’t see without the help of Photoshop: two-headed fish. Pictures of deformed baby trout with two heads show up in a study of creeks in a remote part of southeast Idaho.

The study examined the effects of a contaminant called selenium. It comes from a nearby mine owned by the agribusiness giant, J.R. Simplot. Critics say the two-headed trout have implications beyond a couple of Idaho creeks.

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Environment
8:25 am
Tue January 3, 2012

82-acres in Pierce County to be wildlife preserve

TACOMA, Wash. — An 82-acre peninsula in Pierce County has been purchased for protection as a wildlife preserve.

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Environment
8:15 am
Mon April 25, 2011

Seattle City Light tries osprey deterrent on utility poles

An oprey takes his lunch to go along the Duwamish River. Seattle City Light is testing a new way to keep ospreys from nesting on utility poles.
Jim Kaiser

Wildlife experts think they may have finally outsmarted the osprey, at least when it comes to keeping them off of utility poles. The hawk-like birds have caused power outages and harm to themselves by nesting on high voltage power lines.

Ospreys are pretty resourceful birds. When the tall, bare trees they used to nest in disappeared from the water’s edge, they figured out utility poles were a close substitute. Whenever humans try to stop them from using the poles, ospreys find a workaround.

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