tsunami debris

Japanese Tsunami
8:39 am
Mon January 30, 2012

Japanese official inspects Neah Bay flotsam

PORT ANGELES, Wash. — An official from the Japanese consulate in Seattle has visited the home of a Port Angeles man to inspect a large black float he found near Neah Bay to determine if it's some of the first debris from the tsunami that hit Japan last March.

Read more
Japanese Tsunami
11:21 am
Thu January 19, 2012

Endoscope captures first glimpse inside crippled Japanese reactorc

Originally published on Thu January 19, 2012 9:46 am

The images are blurred by steam and obscured by radiation. But they are the first look we've gotten inside Japan's Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor that was crippled by a tsunami last year.

Read more
Japanese Tsunami
4:30 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

Most tsunami debris must be removed from the ocean by hand

The whole crew of Project Kaisei tries to lift an island of net and plastic estimated at over a ton.
Ryan Yerkley

How do you remove from the ocean more than 100,000 tons of Japanese tsunami debris heading for Northwest shores? By hand, says one expert.

“When you’re talking about open ocean … It’s a very big ocean,” says Andrea Neal, an experienced ocean cleaner. “There isn’t a whole lot being done in the open ocean.”

That’s because most programs devoted to cleaning marine debris focus on prevention and coastal cleanup. When crews do confront debris in the open ocean, cleanup efforts require hands, a ship and supplies which can cost more than $35,000 per day to operate, because the composition of the debris makes it difficult to get out of the ocean.

Read more
Japanese Tsunami
4:42 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Still a threat, but tsunami debris 'invisible'

Debris from the Japanese Tsunami picked up by Russian boat the Pallada.
IPRC

Even though there is 100,000 tons of debris from the Japanese tsunami  on its way toward the Northwest, its virtually invisible unless you run into it.

“They could detect debris from space for over two weeks after the tsunami, but after that it became invisible,” said Jan Hafner of the International Pacific Research Center in Hawaii.

He, along with a group of researchers headed by Nikolai Maximenko, recently predicted the drift pattern of tsunami debris across the Pacific Ocean.

Read more
Tsunami debris
12:53 pm
Thu November 3, 2011

Debris from Japanese tsunami a threat to NW jobs, Cantwell says

Model of the debris from the Japanese tsunami reaching the NW coastline.
University of Hawaii

Calling it an “emerging threat,” Sen. Maria Cantwell testified in congress yesterday that a floating debris field five-times the size of the state of Washington is heading for the West Coast and could disrupt the state’s economy when it lands in 2014.

“After the tragic tsunami that struck Japan, whole communities were swept out to sea in an unwieldy mass of toxic debris,” she testified in the Senate Commerce Committee. “We can’t wait until all of this tsunami trash washes ashore. We need to have an aggressive plan on how we’re going to deal with it.”

Read more

Pages