stocks

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It’s not uncommon for heirs to stumble across old stock certificates when disposing of an estate. What should you do with them?

If the stock is for a recognized company that’s still in business, your task is relatively easy. If there’s no cancellation stamp on the certificate, any brokerage can cash it in for you (but you’ll need to provide the necessary paperwork proving you inherited it).

If you don’t recognize the company name and can’t find it online, then you have some work to do. We’ll help you get started.

www.SeniorLiving.org / flickr.com

Why are exchange traded funds (ETFs) growing in popularity?

Financial commentator Greg Heberlein says the ability to buy and sell them at any time during market hours makes them very appealing.

 

The financial markets have been roiling lately, a sign that a change of direction might be about to occur, or already is underway. However, crystal balls tend to be more cloudy than clear. No one consistently appraises the markets accurately. 

No matter the market direction, financial advisers are not timid about telling you to rebalance your portfolio. But KPLU financial commentator Greg Heberlein says it's OK to ignore that advice.

jking89 / flickr.com

The financial media are full of suggestions for timing the stock market. We usually discredit those schemes on Money Matters, but this month we talk about one that might have at least a little merit to it.

The strategy is to “sell in May and go away.” 

It’s based on the notion that the six months from late fall to late spring are great for owning stocks. Conversely, the period starting in May is not.  Those periods are often referred to as the winter months vs. the summer months.

Does it really work?

Alin S Living with Autism / flickr.com

Investors encounter numerous indices claiming to predict the future. Some are ridiculous, and some are based on facts. But most are worthless.

This week on Money Matters, financial commentator Greg Heberlein and KPLU’s Dave Meyer look at the January effect, sports indicators, and the fear index.

AP

CHICAGO (AP) — Boeing Co. says it will buy back $1.5 billion to $2 billion of its shares next year, and it is boosting its dividend.

Boeing says the buybacks and higher dividend are possible because it is generating cash and has a positive growth outlook.

Boeing shareholders have been waiting to benefit from its new 787 plane.

The share repurchases will use up the rest of the money authorized for that purpose by Boeing's board in 2007. Boeing also raised its dividend 10 percent, to 48.5 cents per share.

Shibby777

If you’ve been following the gloomy economic news, you might be surprised that lots of Washington stocks have been doing quite well this year.

Top of the pack so far this year? Expedia, the travel web site company based in Bellevue. Expedia stock has soared 66 percent so far this year.

What’s going on? Dan Su is an analyst with Morningstar who covers Expedia. She says the company has been overhauling its web sites to make them more user-friendly and to better compete with rival Priceline.

401kcalculator.org

Exchange-Traded Funds (ETFs) are a popular alternative to mutual funds.

Are they right for you? 

On this week's Money Matters, financial commentator Greg Heberlein tells KPLU's Dave Meyer that a well diversified ETF can be a great investment.

McCormick & Schmick's Seafood Restaurants, Inc.

McCormick and Schick's Seafood Restaurants are a popular dining choice in the Seattle area. The Portland-based company is being sold to Houston-based Landry's Restaurants.

On this week's Money Matters, financial commentator Greg Heberlein says the sale demonstrates why you should be skeptical about the recommendations of securities analysts.

David Paul Ohmer / Flickr

Over the past 30 years, U.S. Treasuries have out-performed the stock market. Bloomberg's Cordell Eddings reports the last time that happened was 150 years ago. What's going on?

On this week's Money Matters, financial commentator Greg Heberlein says this is a rare event and not "the new normal."

Bill Schultheis

Ever since the 2008 financial meltdown, a lot of us have been losing sleep over our investments and 401(k) plans. But a financial adviser in Kirkland has a simple approach to reducing the stress.

On this week’s Money Matters, KPLU’s Dave Meyer talks to Bill Schultheis, author of The New Coffeehouse Investor: How to Build Wealth, Ignore Wall Street, and Get On With Your Life.

Unless you're a Warren Buffet, Bill says trying to outperform the stock market is a waste of time:

s_falkow / Flickr

Is the economy recovering … or heading for another recession? Uncertainty has been growing in recent weeks with conflicting economic indicators and high volatility on Wall Street.

On this week’s "Money Matters" with financial commentator Greg Heberlein and KPLU’s Dave Meyer, Greg changes his mind about how soon the economy will recover. Instead of a 5 to 10 year recovery, Greg thinks it'll be more like 10 to 15 years.

Sjoerd van Oosten / flickr.com

A rising Consumer Price Index (CPI) has caused more doom and gloom on Wall Street. But on this week's Money Matters, financial commentator Greg Heberlein tells KPLU's Dave Meyer it's nothing to worry about. A bane for Wall Street can actually be a boon for Main Street.

IPO fever

May 24, 2011
Zillow, Inc.

LinkedIn's IPO seemed like a flashback to the heyday of the 1990's. The company's stock doubled in value on its first day of trading. On this week's Money Matters, financial commentator Greg Heberlein thinks this will be a good year for IPOs. At least three locally based companies are preparing to go public, and more may be waiting in the wings.

gonzalo_ar / Flickr

Shareholders often get excited when their companies announce share buyback programs. If a company reduces shares in the marketplace, an investor’s share of the company goes up. So that's good, right? Usually, it is, but sometimes it can be a sign that the company is in trouble.

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