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Two days after mixed martial arts superstar Conor McGregor announced his retirement on Twitter, he delivered a new message: "I AM NOT RETIRED," he wrote in a statement on Facebook.

As some MMA fans suspected, McGregor's retirement announcement on Tuesday was simply a maneuver to gain leverage in his contract disagreement with the Ultimate Fighting Championships, the league that hosts MMA fights.

Joanie Laurer, who overcame a troubled home life in Rochester, N.Y., to win an international following as the pro wrestler Chyna, has died at age 45, according to her official website and World Wrestling Entertainment. Police found her body at her home in Redondo Beach, Calif., on Wednesday, according to local media.

The news emerged after this message was posted to her Facebook page last night:

Conor McGregor, one of the world's biggest mixed martial arts stars, shocked fans on Tuesday when he said he was retiring.

"I have decided to retire young. Thanks for the cheese. Catch ya's later," he tweeted.

Two Ethiopian runners wore the golden laurels denoting winners of the Boston Marathon Monday, marking the first time in the race's 120 years that Ethiopian racers won both the men's and women's divisions.

For the men, it was newcomer Lemi Berhanu Hayle, 21; for the women, it was Atsede Baysa, 29, whose career includes wins in Paris and Chicago.

New York has ended its ban on professional mixed martial arts — the last state in the U.S. to do so — and the Ultimate Fighting Championship wasted no time in announcing a match at Madison Square Garden.

The league said it will host a major pay-per-view event at the storied venue on Nov. 12.

"Our commitment to bringing incredible live events to New York starts immediately," UFC Chairman and CEO Lorenzo Fertitta said at Thursday's bill-signing event with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

The governor echoed that sentiment.

Four years ago, in superstar guard Stephen Curry's injury-truncated third season, the Golden State Warriors went 23-43 and missed the playoffs by 13 games.

On Wednesday night, they beat the Memphis Grizzlies 125-104 to finish their regular season 73-9, breaking the Chicago Bulls' 20-year-old NBA record for most wins in a season.

Updated: 1:25 a.m. ET Thursday:

In his final NBA game Wednesday night, Kobe Bryant scored 60 points — helping the Los Angeles Lakers defeat the Utah Jazz, 101-96. He scored 23 points in the final quarter.

The Associated Press reports:

Brazil is battling a recession, political chaos, high crime and the spreading Zika virus. All these factors seem to be conspiring to drive potential ticket buyers away in advance of the Summer Olympic Games set to open Aug. 5 in Rio de Janeiro.

It's the kind of shot that belongs on a pool table, not a golf course. But Louis Oosthuizen was playing in the final round of the 2016 Masters, and his tee shot was instantly called the craziest in an unlikely trio of holes-in-one made on the same hole Sunday.

In his competitive diving career, four-time Olympic diving gold medalist and five-time world champion Greg Louganis has been all over the world. Now he'll be in one place that's eluded him for years: your kitchen table.

Wheaties announced that Louganis — who is openly gay and HIV-positive — along with two other former Olympians, hurdler Edwin Moses and swimmer Janet Evans, will be featured on the cereal boxes as part of the revamped "legends" series.

North Carolina will look for its sixth NCAA championship when the Tar Heels meet the Villanova Wildcats, trying for their second, on Monday night.

The Tar Heels (33-6) last won it all in 2009 and Villanova's only title came in 1985.

Both teams advanced to the championship game with lopsided wins, but Villanova's was far more of a blowout than North Carolina's.

Five star players from the U.S. women's national soccer team have filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, saying that the U.S. Soccer Federation pays the reigning World Cup champions far less than their male counterparts.

No matter which teams win or lose in this weekend's NCAA tournament Final Four games, at the final whistle, there will inevitably be one iconic, unavoidable face.

It will be Michael Jordan's. And it will be crying.

The meme of the basketball legend's tear-stained countenance is the sports world's go-to symbol of sadness in defeat, so expect to see at least a few renditions of Jordan's watery mug superimposed onto losing players, losing fans, losing mascots, losing coaches, or anyone or anything else who is at all associated with a loss.

The U.S. men's national soccer team beat Guatemala 4-0 Tuesday night in a crucial World Cup qualifying game in Columbus, Ohio. With the victory, the U.S. will advance to the next round of qualifying for the 2018 World Cup in Russia.

Striker Clint Dempsey scored in the 12th minute to give the U.S. the early lead. Defender Geoff Cameron then managed to get on the end of a free kick from midfielder Michael Bradley to head the second goal home in the 35th minute.

Former NBA star and current basketball broadcaster Bill Walton was once at a point in his life where he considered suicide after a debilitating back injury.

He speaks with NPR's Scott Simon about his injury, his ultimate recovery, tidbits from his time playing for UCLA and legendary coach John Wooden, and even talks a bit about the Grateful Dead and why some lyrics have special meaning.

Listen to the interview in the audio player above.

After apologizing for his series of remarks about female tennis players, Raymond Moore, CEO of the BNP Paribas Open tennis tournament in Indian Wells, Calif., has resigned.

Extending a long-awaited trip to the NCAA men's basketball tournament, No. 12 seed Yale upset fifth-seed Baylor in the West region Thursday night. Yale notched its first-ever win at the Big Dance, 79-75, relying on strong defense and rebounding.

The historic win comes at the Yale Bulldogs' first trip to the NCAAs since 1962, as Yale's student newspaper reports. The paper adds, "The Ivy League's automatic NCAA Tournament bid has now resulted in five wins over the past seven tournaments."

Basketball As A Way Out Of Syria's War

Mar 16, 2016

Editor's Note: Hozaifa Almaleh made his name as a basketball player in Syria. The sport also provided an avenue out of the country as it suffers through a devastating civil war. As the country marks five years since the start of the uprising, the 6-foot-5 Almaleh reflects on the game — and the war — that has led him to Chicago.

A discussion on Capitol Hill about concussion research brought a startling moment Monday, as an NFL executive acknowledged for the first time that football has been linked to a degenerative brain disease.

Jeff Miller, the NFL's executive vice president for health and safety, admitted the connection when he was asked about research by Boston University neuropathologist Dr. Ann McKee, who has reported finding signs of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in the brains of 90 out of 94 former pro football players — and 45 out of 55 former college players.

For the third year in a row, Dallas Seavey is the first musher to reach Nome, Alaska, winning his fourth Iditarod championship overall. Seavey had been the first to reach the race's final checkpoints, ahead of his father, Mitch – another previous champion.

Seavey's team of seven dogs averaged nearly 9.5 miles an hour on the 1,000-mile journey, according to the Iditarod competition tracking website.

A few short years ago, Brazil was soaring. Its economy was on the upswing and the country was preparing for the international spotlight with the 2014 World Cup.

But now, as it gets ready to host the Summer Olympics this August, Brazil is mired in political crisis and economic turmoil, and is plagued by the worsening Zika virus. Over the weekend, more than a million demonstrators hit the streets to protest against the government and demand the president's resignation.

What happened?

Political Crisis

One dog has been killed and multiple dogs have been injured by a snowmobiler in what appears to be an intentional attack on competitors in the Iditarod Race in Alaska.

Iditarod veteran Aliy Zirkle was the first to report an attack.

A snowmachiner had "repeatedly attempted to harm her and her team," the Iditarod Trail Committee says, and one of Zirkle's dogs had received a non-life-threatening injury.

Zirkle reported the attack when she arrived in Nulato, Alaska, in the wee hours of the morning, and race officials and law enforcement were notified.

Women sportscasters are heartened by the jury verdict this week that awarded their colleague Erin Andrews $55 million.

Andrews was secretly videotaped while naked by a stalker through the peephole in her hotel room door. Both the stalker and the hotel owner were found liable.

Last week, Izaic Yorks, a senior at the University of Washington, ran a mile in 3:53 — the fastest college mile ever by an American. The effort qualifies him for the Olympic trials this summer.

So why isn't Yorks running in the mile at this weekend's NCAA championships in Birmingham, Ala.?

Turns out, he had to make a decision: run that mile alone, or run with his team in the distance medley relay or DMR.

While most of the country would be happy never to hear the word "Deflategate" ever again, people named Goodell are still very concerned with the year-old scandal and whether New England Patriots' quarterback Tom Brady tampered with game balls.

The boy who narrowly missed being hit in the face by a wayward baseball bat has explained why he was distracted at the game: He was sending a photo of the game to his mom and sister. And he says his first pro baseball game was "amazing."

Tennis star Maria Sharapova has lost several major sponsors after admitting that she failed a drug test at the Australian Open.

Five-time Grand Slam champion Maria Sharapova announced at a news conference Monday that she failed a drug test at the Australian Open.

The current world No. 7 said she was notified by the International Tennis Federation several days ago. The Tennis Anti-Doping Program confirmed to The New York Times that she will be "provisionally suspended" starting on March 12, "pending the determination of the case."

Two-time Super Bowl winning quarterback Peyton Manning, 39, announced his retirement Monday at a news conference in Englewood, Colo.

A visibly emotional Manning shared an anecdote from his first of 18 seasons in the NFL, when he had a chance to shake the hand of legendary quarterback Johnny Unitas after a tough loss to the Baltimore Ravens. Choking up as he remembered the exchange, Manning said: "He told me, 'Peyton, you stay at it, I'm pulling for you.' "

The best play at this weekend's spring training game between the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Atlanta Braves didn't take place on the field — it was in the stands, where a man's fast reflexes saved a young fan from being hit in the face after a bat hurtled into the stands.

In an instant that's frozen in time, the barrel of the bat looms just inches away from the boy's nose and eyes, with the man's hand and forearm blocking its path.

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