Elaine Thompson / AP

Home prices in major markets around the U.S. dropped to their lowest levels since 2006 in March. But not in Seattle.

After falling almost two percent in February, Seattle home prices were up a modest 0.1 percent in March, but still down 7.5 percent compared to March 2010.

1Yen / Flickr

Seattle and the Puget Sound area seem to be popping up on those "top ten" and "best places to..." lists with increasing regularity.

Jeff Maurone / flickr

"A corpse is meat gone bad. Well, and what's cheese? Corpse of milk."

~ James Joyce

If, after digesting that quote, you still have a thing for cheese, by all means, read on.

The Seattle Cheese Festival is this weekend. Cheese makers from all over the world will be coming to Pike Place Market for this festival featuring delicious yellow and white tidbits of tastiness.

Leslie Seaton / Fresh-Picked Seattle

Leslie Seaton is a writer who loves to eat, drink, and tell people what to do. That’s part of the reason why she started her food events site called Fresh-Picked Seattle which then led to Freeattle.

The Daily Beast

Happy Mother's Day, Seattle moms. You live in the fourth-best place in the U.S. to be a mother.

At least that's what The Daily Beast is saying after ranking the 100 largest cities and ranking them on criteria such as mothers-per-capita, quality of public schools, number of childcare workers and availability of maternity health specialists.

Flickr, @photo

A surprisingly solid March – that's the consensus about last month's retail sales.  Despite cold weather and climbing gas prices, shoppers spent a lot more money last month than they did in March a year ago.

Costco and Nordstrom are among the local companies that are benefiting.


Making headlines around the Northwest this morning:

  • Boeing Plant Still Closed After Power Outage
  • Seattle Tunnel Opponents Up Against Deadline
  • State Will Fix Perilous Part of Highway 2 in Snohomish County


Auburn's First and Second Shift Shut Down Today

Transformers failed at Boeing's Auburn plant on Saturday, forcing an evacuation, and canceling work for thousands of workers Monday

John Froschauer / AP

My friends always tend to disbelieve me (in general, but also specifically) when I tell them that one out of every three people on the planet has been infected with tuberculosis.

So where are all these consumptive folks, they might say? — This is assuming they know that TB used to be called consumption because of the way it “consumed” and withered the body as the infection progressed.

They’re everywhere, I’d reply, including right here in wealthy and smug Seattle.

Seattle, in fact, has one of the worst problems with TB in the nation. But it’s always here, managed by the public health folks, so it’s hardly news.

The news is that it’s World TB Day.

Read More

Gary Davis / KPLU

Good morning. Will it be as sunny as Wednesday? No, but we will see occasional sun breaks along with clouds and showers around western Washington today, according to the National Weather Service. 

Making headlines this morning:

  • Guilty Plea in Afghan Civilian Murders
  • Seattle Pays Out Millions in Madison Valley Flood Suit
  • New Plan Could Keep State History Museums Open


Morlock Pleads Guilty to Murder

Army Spc. Jeremy Morlock pleaded guilty to three counts of murder of unarmed Afghan civilians, admitting the motive in the deaths was " kill people."  Morlock's plea came at a Joint Base Lewis-McChord court martial hearing Wednesday, a process followed closely by KPLU's Austin Jenkins.

Morlock will be a key witness in hearings of four Stryker Brigade platoon mates who are also charged in the deaths, reports The News Tribune's Adam Ashton: 

Morlock will be a key witness against Staff Sgt. Calvin Gibbs, who allegedly plotted to murder Afghan civilians and brought his comrades along with him. Gibbs denies the charges and is expected to face a court-martial in June.

The war crimes are the subject of international attention, with photographs of soldiers posing with corpses published online this past week by Germany's Der Spiegel.


Making headlines around the Northwest this morning:

  • Push to Preserve Iconic Seattle PI Globe
  • Warnings of Phone Scams
  • Plea Deal for JBLM Soldier Likely for Afghan War Crimes


It's About the PI

Some Seattle City Council members are concerned the iconic globe atop the offices on the city's central waterfront may go away if it's not protected. They're considering landmark status for neon-lighted orb that has been spinning for 63 years. It has survived the company's shift from daily newspaper to a smaller, online-only venture.

MaplessinSeattle / Flickr

Seattle’s on-again-off-again festival celebrating all things cannabis seems to be on again.

Officials with Seattle Hempfest say they’ve resolved their dispute with the city and the event will be held as scheduled in mid-August at Myrtle Edwards Park. 


Seattle's venerable end of summer music festival is making changes to avoid a repeat of last year's event: disappointing ticket sales. Festival organizers cited heavy rains for keeping people away, but the changes suggest last year's tickeing schemes may have played a role.

Bumbershoot producer One Reel announced it will drop a discount ticket plan that excluded main stage shows. Instead, it will return to tickets good for all shows, according to The Seattle Times.

Haraz N. Ghanbari / AP

If your heart suddenly stops beating, your chances of getting revived are better in King County than in the rest of Washington.

The Seattle area has one of the highest survival rates from cardiac arrest in the country. Now, a new campaign in Washington aims to boost survival from cardiac arrest by 50-percent in the rest of the state. 

Richard Hagar

It's happening all over the country, including in the Pacific Northwest. People are walking away from their mortgages. In most cases, the homes that are being abandoned are valued for less than their mortgage. 


The brunt of an arctic cold front is expected to hit Western Washington this afternoon, bringing wind and 2 to 6 inches of snow.  National Weather Service meteorologist Art Gable says temperatures "will drop below freezing and remain below into Thursday morning." A winter storm warning remains in effect through 10 a.m. Thursday.