plastics

bottled water ban
5:01 am
Mon July 1, 2013

WWU to become largest public college in U.S. to ban bottled water

Anna Amundson, a WWU alumnae and past president of Students for Sustainable Water fills up at one of three grant-funded hydration stations students have spearheaded to replace use of water in disposable plastic bottles.
courtesy Carolyn Bowie

Western Washington University is poised to become the largest public university in the country to ban sales of bottled water. The school joins Evergreen State College and Seattle University in making the move.

For many young environmentalists, saying no to bottled water and yes to public taps is an easy choice and a cause they can get passionate about.

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Could you do it?
6:14 am
Tue May 21, 2013

Exhibit inspires woman to try to avoid buying plastics for a month

A look at the accumulation of plastics that crept into Sam Porter's life, despite her pledge not to use or buy any new plastics for a month.
courtesy Burke Museum

Plastics have only been in wide use since the 1940s, yet they are everywhere, from sandwich bags to phones, to keyboards, to rain gear. Even the cans of soup in the grocery aisle are lined with it.

It's hard to imagine a world before these conveniences. What would your life be like without plastics?

Seattle resident Samantha Porter decided to find out. She works behind the scenes of the Burke Museum, which is hosting an exhibit titled "Plastics Unwrapped."

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Environment
5:01 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Mount Rainier National Park poised to ban sales of bottled water

Grand Canyon National Park is one of the most recent federal properties to ban bottled water sales. Before doing so, they had to install a siuffient number of filling stations like this one.
Courtesy Think Outside the Bottle

The disposable plastic water bottle is known for clogging landfills and choking marine life. As a result, 14 national parks no longer sell bottled water. And it looks like Mount Rainier National Park might be next.

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Environment
10:12 pm
Thu December 20, 2012

"Plastics Unwrapped" puts eyes on everyday objects at Burke Museum

Bales of hundreds of disposable plastic bags show the rate at which we use them: 3,000 per every quarter of a second in the United States, say the Burke museum curators who created several of these "statistical sculptures" for their new traveling show.
courtesy Burke Museum

The  University of Washington’s 113 year-old Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture is debuting a new look and feel. Curators there say they want people to think more about everyday objects and how they evoke our place in the world.

“The Life Before You” is the new tag line encouraging visitors to discover and explore the Burke’s collections. First up, as the rebranding rolls out, is a new temporary exhibition called Plastics Unwrapped.

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Environment
12:50 am
Tue December 18, 2012

Rent a living X-mas tree

You can avoid this scene and help a non-profit restore the riparian zone along local streams by renting a living tree.
Photo by by Sappymoosetree Flickr

What’s the best way to have a Christmas tree…and not feel like you’re killing it?

The Adopt-a-Stream Foundation in Everett says if you don’t mind something that looks a bit scrappy, you can have your tree and plant it too.

The foundation says it rented out 100 trees over this past weekend…and they have about 100 more available. They’ll be open 9-5 through Friday.

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Environment
7:40 am
Tue July 31, 2012

Rising rate of plastics ingested by birds off the coast of Washington

An example of non-food items and plastics found in the stomach of a Northern Fulmar collected off the coast of the Pacific Northwest.
Stephanie Avery-Gomm

A new study suggests there’s been a dramatic increase in plastic pollution off the coast of the Pacific Northwest over the past 40 years.

That’s after analysis of trash ingested by seabirds in Washington and British Columbia.

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Environment
11:56 am
Wed May 9, 2012

Study: Plastic in Pacific Ocean increased 100-fold in 40 years

An insect known as a "sea skater." Scientists say the abundance of floating plastic has led to an increase of these creatures.
Scripp Institution of Oceanography

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 11:31 am

The amount of plastic debris in the part of the Pacific Ocean known as the "Great Pacific Garbage Patch" has grown 100-fold in the past 40 years.

In a paper published today by the journal Biology Letters, scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography report that most of that plastic has degraded into pieces no bigger than a fingernail. But that wasn't the major finding the scientists are reporting.

The scientists have found that all those pieces of plastic have provided ample opportunity for insects called "sea skaters" to breed.

The AP reports:

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Consumer Choices
10:30 am
Fri November 18, 2011

'Bag your bags' King County says of troublesome plastics

If you’re confused about what to do with the plastic bags you get at grocery stores, you’re not alone. 

Many people know that they’re bad for the environment and that they can be recycled, but how to recycle them is another question.

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