Pike Place Market

Ed Ronco

Chances are, you’ve seen him perform. Come rain or shine, Jonny Hahn has been playing piano at Seattle's iconic Pike Place Market for 28 years as tourists and shoppers rush about.

With the rainy season settling in, we asked him: What’s it like to brave the weather and perform year-round? Listen to his 90-second answer:

Gabriel Spitzer / KPLU

The Seattle City Council is marking a cultural anniversary Monday: 40 years of legal busking in the city. Seattle musician Jim Page was behind the ordinance that legalized street performing back in 1974.

Page said he was playing guitar and singing one day in front of Oliver’s Meats, near Pike Place Market.

“I’m just singing along, and a motorcycle police officer pulled over,” Page said. “And he shouted at me over his motor and said, ‘Do you have a permit?’ I said no. He said, ‘Next time I see you,, I’ll give you a ticket.’”

Page said he offered to get a license, but was told he couldn’t do that, since he was not blind.

Aaron Hushagen / KPLU

Ten million people visit Pike Place Market every year, and that doesn’t even count the spirits haunting the place. There are ample legends, of course, and those ghost stories offer a window into Seattle’s history.

Even if you think all that ghost stuff is just bunk, the cool thing about the Market Ghost Tour is that it lets you see beyond the flowers and souvenir Space Needle magnets. It helps you imagine all the people who have worked and lived at the market since it was created in 1907.

Miller Hull Partnership

The city of Seattle and Pike Place Market are planning a new building and walkway that will snake down to the waterfront. They’re hoping to begin construction as soon as next summer and have it done before the viaduct comes down.

Right now, if you’re down at the Ferris wheel and you want to get up to Pike Place Market, you have to find the elevator or go up a long set of stairs. It’s confusing.

The complete removal of Seattle’s Alaskan Way Viaduct is years away. The tunnel replacing it won’t open till 2015.

But this summer marks a crucial moment for the iconic Pike Place Market as the waterfront is redeveloped.

You can't actually see most of the work that was done on Pike Place Market's $69-million, three-year remodel. It involved a lot of plumbing, wiring, and seismic upgrades. Under the floorboards, inside the walls, and deep in the basements, the bones and nerves of the market were undergoing radical surgery.

Here's a slide-show of snapshots taken by the construction team:

Keith Seinfeld / KPLU

You paid for it, now please come enjoy it. That’s the message the Pike Place Market is sending out, as it wraps up three years and $69-million worth of renovations.

Unfortunately, if you're the proud executive in charge, the public probably won't notice much.

"The most significant parts of the renovations are behind the walls … the seismic upgrades, electrical improvements, all new plumbing," says Ben Franz-Knight, Executive Director of the Pike Place Market Preservation & Development Authority.

Jeff Maurone / flickr

"A corpse is meat gone bad. Well, and what's cheese? Corpse of milk."

~ James Joyce

If, after digesting that quote, you still have a thing for cheese, by all means, read on.

The Seattle Cheese Festival is this weekend. Cheese makers from all over the world will be coming to Pike Place Market for this festival featuring delicious yellow and white tidbits of tastiness.

AP Photo

King County deputies' pay-cut plan rejected, a car injures pedestrians at the Pike Place Market, the fight over proposed ferry service cuts heats up, and a popular Seattle language school closes.

Exec Says King County Deputies' Pay Plan Won't Fly

Dow Constantine says a union-offered plan to save taxpayers money would actually cost them more.