Other News

Interesting news stories from around the Pacific Northwest.

An Almost Obsolete Profession: The Film Cutter

Jan 16, 2016
Wikimedia Commons

Gabriel Spitzer talks with Andy Pratt about the inevitable demise of his business, Deluxe Archive Solutions.

Pratt has worked for decades as a film cutter, with a hand in a few movies you may have heard of: "Star Wars," "Indiana Jones" and "Dirty Harry," among many others.

DAS is one of the last big negative-cutting houses in the country, but with the industry almost completely digital now, it won't be long before Pratt's passion and livelihood are obsolete.

Art Skool Damage

 

Kathleen Wilson grew up loving gossip. Wilson would spend nights with Confidential magazine and later in her life ended up writing the column, "It’s My Party" for The Stranger.

Wilson tells Sound Effect senior producer, Arwen Nicks about what it was like to write a gossip column in a smaller and slower Seattle. And why she decided to leave gossip (mostly) for good.

 

thephotographymuse via Creative Commons / Flickr

 

Today on Sound Effect we look back at looking back as we explore the theme, "Nostalgia."

Skate King has been torn down and soon there will be a Harley Davidson dealership in that lot but the ghosts of athlete's foot past and the penchant for flared pants and disco dancing on wheels lives on in our hearts and minds. Gabriel Spitzer took a spin at the rink before the lights went down for good.

Dear friends, Thank you for your calls, emails, non-stop social media efforts — everything! What you’ve done is amazing. We are eternally grateful for all you have done to get us to this place.

We wanted to give you an update on what’s happening with the campaign:

Great Expectations: Dickens And The Powerball

Jan 13, 2016

The Powerball bonanza, which has touched an unprecedented $1.5 billion, may be the largest jackpot in human history, but the frenzied ticket buying and wild hopes attending it are hardly new. Ask Charles Dickens.

Wikimedia Commons

 

This week on Sound Effect, "The Doctor Is In." We revisit some of our favorite stories on health, aging, things that take us to the doctor, and the toll that doctors often feel from helping others.

Courtesy of Leila Mirhaydari

Editor's Note: This story originally ran as part of Sound Effect's inaugural episode which aired Jan. 10, 2015.

Pamela Wible

Physicians are in the business of saving lives but they have one of the highest suicide rates of any profession.  An estimated 400 doctors a year take their own lives. Pamela Wible is a physician in Eugene, Oregon and she’s devoted a big part of her career to helping doctors cope with thoughts of suicide.

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So most of us probably take our general baseline physical comfort for granted. But imagine if something as innocent as a friendly pat on the back caused intense pain.

So for people who suffer from Fibromyalgia, that is your daily life. It’s pain, interrupted by brief bursts of relief.

Lauren Jhanson lives with this disorder, and talked about how it’s made her feel differently about her own comfort zone, and the strides she has taken to not let it hold her back anymore in life.   

wiki commons

What is it about aging that is so hard? And what exactly is aging? Those are some of the questions that Dr. Dan Gotchling is trying to answer. 

Gotchling heads the Gotchling Lab at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and he spoke with Sound Effect host Gabriel Spitzer about the biological perils of aging and what it means at the most micro level.

Meet Death With Dignity Champion, Robb Miller

Jan 9, 2016
provided by Robb Miller

Robb Miller worked as executive director of Compassion and Choices of Washington (now End of Life Washington) for most of the last two decades. That organization helps people with end of life decision making as they face incurable or terminal illnesses, and they pushed for the passage of Washington’s Death with Dignity Act.

Drawing Out The Green River Killer

Jan 2, 2016
Green River Killer: A True Detective Story

Detective Tom Jensen spent more than 20 years looking for the Green River Killer. After Gary Ridgeway was arrested and charged, the lead detective and the murderer spent 188 days together as authorities made efforts to collect as much information as possible.   

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What do a gutter-punk and a police captain have in common? They are both keen observers.

In this segment from Sound Effect's second episode, host Gabriel Spitzer takes a tour of Westlake Park from two men on opposite sides of the law.

First we hear from a man who would only give his name as Shake and then Precinct Captain Chris Fowler

Green River Killer: A True Detective Story


Sound Effect is your weekly tour of ideas inspired by the place we live.

 

For this episode, the Sound Effect team curates some of our favorite segments dealing with law and justice.

 

 

LORI EANES

Back in 2007, Jennie Grant craved fresh goat’s milk. She got a taste of it in California and was surprised it wasn’t musty. She knew goats in Seattle weren’t legal. But she got one anyway, a white Mini LaMancha.  She named her Snowflake.

“The rules said you couldn’t keep farm animals such as sheep or cows. But if you love your goat and take them on a walk periodically, aren’t they pets also?” asked Grant. She thinks of Snowflake more of a pet than livestock.

NPR

You may have dreamt of doing it yourself, but Shon Hopwood made most people's action-movie dreams his reality and it ended with a stark dose of reality.

 

In 1998, when Hopwood was 22 and living in Nebraska, he robbed a bank. The 11-bank crime spree started as a joke with his friend, but that didn't stay a joke for long.

From bank robber to jailhouse lawyer to having cases heard by the U.S. Supreme Court, we hear a tale of how breaking the law turned into practicing it.

In 2014, Charlotte Wheelock and her husband, Nick Hodges, were hoping to find a new start. Struggling to raise their two young children, they left their home in Albuquerque, N.M., and struck out for Seattle to find better jobs.

But before they could get established there, Nick was hospitalized with spinal stenosis — a condition that left him temporarily paralyzed below the waist. Soon, they found themselves without a place to live.

Editor's Note: NPR opened a South Korea bureau in March. Correspondent Elise Hu takes a look at the wonder and the wackiness of life and journalism in East Asia.

KPLU’s Dick Stein and Nick Morrison are always talking about movies, and are widely considered the movie experts around the station. Recently, they both ended up revisiting a David Mamet movie that was filmed in Seattle back in the '80s. So we thought, instead of them just sharing their review with each other, why not share it with everyone? They agreed, and produced the first, and perhaps only installment of what they call "We Like To Watch."

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When Sound Effect producer Kevin Kniestedt heard what was arguably the greatest karaoke performance of his life, he didn't shake her hand, and didn't even ask her name. He did nothing. Was she lost forever?  

In this segment from our episode Lost and Found, which originally aired in March 2015, we hear the story of Kevin's quest to find the mysterious performer and Sound Effect senior producer Arwen Nicks explains how he ruins it. 

Gabriel Spitzer

Sound Effect is your weekly tour of ideas inspired by the place we live. The show is hosted by the wonderful Gabriel Spitzer. This week, the Sound Effect team revisits some of its favorite stories that aired over the last year.  

Matthew Streib

Sound Effect is your weekly tour of ideas inspired by the place we live. The show is hosted by the wonderful Gabriel Spitzer. This week the Sound Effect team explores traditions and takes a look at some lesser-known and long-held practices.

From Vancouver To China: The Tradition Of Reburial

Dec 19, 2015
Matthew Streib

When British Columbia joined Canada in 1871, the nation promised to build a railroad to connect Vancouver to the east. But labor was short, and white workers were costly, so railroad companies shipped in migrant labor from China.

The Tradition of 'Laser Floyd' At The Pacific Science Center Laser Dome

Dec 19, 2015
Warren Langford / KPLU

For most people, when they hear the words “Laser” and “Floyd” together the first thing that comes to mind is usually not “time honored tradition.” But that’s exactly what’s been happening at the Pacific Science Center Laser Dome for the last 30 years.

A few days ago, we offered up some tips for playing it cool at the office holiday party. And we asked for your stories.

We got about 8,400 responses to our informal survey. It turns out, about 1 in 4 of you revelers acknowledged getting too tipsy at an office soiree — and later regretting your behavior. Perhaps not surprisingly, 80 percent of you said you've seen co-workers embarrass themselves after overimbibing.

Ah, the holiday season: Glad tidings. Comfort. Joy. Pranks.

Say what?

For some earlier Americans, Christmas was the yearly open season for playing practical jokes on other people — filching wagon wheels, turning road signs the wrong way, lighting firecrackers to scare animals. A sort of cold weather April Fools' Day, perhaps to make the midwinter less bleak.

Some of the gags were benign; others brutal. In any case, the tradition of holiday high jinks goes back, way back before the founding of the country. Here are the 12 Pranks of Christmas:

ohyeahtotally.com


Sound Effect is your weekly tour of ideas, inspired by the place we live. The show is hosted by KPLU's Gabriel Spitzer. Each week's show explores a different theme and this week we are Unplugged… kind of.

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For many, even the mention of the word unplugged conjures up memories of the the MTV series that began in 1989. So when the Sound Effect team decided to explore the theme of 'Unplugged' we knew we had to reach out to music journalist and writer, Charles R. Cross to discuss the Grammy award winning 'Unplugged' performance of Nirvana.

Cross lays out the unseen drama happening within the band and highlights some of his favorite moments of what he calls the best performance of Kurt Cobain's career.   

Gabriel Spitzer / KPLU

If you’ve ever come to, as if from a blackout, realizing you’ve just spent 90 minutes in some Internet rabbit hole or other; perhaps you’ve considered just unplugging – going cold turkey from technology for a little while and just sitting in the quiet. It sounds comforting, even Zen.

Genjo Marinello is an actual Zen priest, the abbot at Dai Bai Zan Cho Bo Zen Temple in Seattle. And you might expect him to be one of those finger-waggers who advocate throwing away your cell phone and just being in the moment.

Bruce Hudson

 

This week on Sound Effect, Gabriel Spitzer and his team scour the archives for the show's most memorable musical segments.

We kick off with a short lesson on a tiny instrument, as Gabriel Spitzer literally tries his hands at the ukulele at the house of a renowned uke expert in Wallingford. Then, off to Vito's on First Hill with Ed Ronco to hear from the restaurant's beloved piano player, Ruby Bishop.

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