Other News

Interesting news stories from around the Pacific Northwest.

AP Images

There's always interesting stuff in the news that gets overshadowed by the big stories. On Sound Effect we invite a panel a journalists to talk over their nominees for under-covered story of the week.   

Joining KPLU's Gabriel Spitzer at this week's roundtable are Hannah Brooks Olsen of Seattlish, Josh Feit news editor of Seattle Met magazine and Emily Parkhurst Digital Managing Editor of the Puget Sound Business Journal.

Theft: Sound Effect, Episode 34

Aug 29, 2015
NPR

Sound Effect is your weekly tour of ideas, inspired by the place we live. The show is hosted by KPLU's Gabriel Spitzer. Each week's show explores a different theme, and this week we're delving into tales of thievery. 

Brieana Ripley, KPLU

Not so long ago, before there were self-driving cars, microprocessors or even abundant electricity, the state-of-the-art technology was clockwork. Through cams and springs and gears, craftspeople were able to create precise tools, rudimentary robots and exquisite pieces of art.

Brittany Nicole Cox is one of a handful of antiquarian horologists trained to preserve and restore those objects. She does that from her Seattle workshop where, in gloves and a white lab coat, Cox gingerly removes a box from one of her vintage hardwood cabinets. It’s her specialty-within-a-specialty: A Victorian-era automaton.

A federal judge in Seattle has made it clear to the state that mentally ill jail inmates need to be evaluated within seven days to see if they’re competent to stand trial.

The incident command for Washington’s biggest wildfire requested a mental health team to help people in Okanogan County. A national nonprofit called Green Cross has responded to the call.

KPLU keeps fund drives short, and your pledge now will make our fall drive even shorter. For every $60,000 we raise toward our $300,000 goal, we’ll knock a day off  of the drive. Help us make this the shortest drive ever! You even have the power to eliminate the drive altogether! 

Your support helps us create stories like this that affect your community:  Tacoma Considers Allowing More Density In Single-Family Neighborhoods

MAKE YOUR GIFT NOW to support the news you love!

Doctors' practices are increasingly trying to reach their patients online. But don't expect your doctor to "friend" you on Facebook – at least, not just yet.

Ticking Clock: Sound Effect, Episode 33

Aug 22, 2015
Brie Ripley / KPLU

Sound Effect is your weekly tour of ideas, inspired by the place we live. The show is hosted by KPLU's Gabriel Spitzer. Each week's show explores a different theme, and this week we ponder the relentless passing of time; the ticking clock.  

After Dark: Sound Effect, Episode 32

Aug 15, 2015
Matthew Streib, KPLU

Sound Effect is your weekly tour of ideas, inspired by the place we live. The show is hosted by KPLU's Gabriel Spitzer. Each week's show explores a different theme, and this week, we shed some light on things that happen after dark. 

Sound Effect Senior Producer, Arwen Nicks learns about the world of after hours public defenders and what it means for them to be on call. 

KPLU's Community Advisory Council will be meeting on Monday, August 31 at 2 p.m. PST.

If you are interested in attending as a member of the listening community, please contact the General Manager's office at (253) 535-8732 for more information.

Slaven's Recommended Reads

Aug 8, 2015

 

Seeing isn’t always believing. In this segment, on Sound Effect, we discuss three books whose stories are propelled by what goes unseen. King County Supervising Librarian Amber Slaven highlights the work of three regional authors who, in their own ways, explore invisibility.

First on her list is Ann Pancake’s most recent book of short stories, “Me and Daddy Listen to Bob Marley.” Pancake, a teacher at Pacific Lutheran University, pens layered stories, evoking narratives of people who are intensely connecting to their land. She addresses the environmental toll of fracking, and how it affects the mental well-being of those who do the work.  Her stories include mention of ghosts, bones, drug addiction, mental illness – all of which are invisible to the naked eye.

Next is Elissa Washuta’s coming of age memoir, “My Body is a Book of Rules.” The reader is strapped to a rollercoaster narrative that parallels her bipolar disorder as the author navigates college in Maryland, then heads off to graduate school in Seattle. As a member of the Cowlitz tribe, who plays up digestible Native stereotypes to appease white adults, Washuta tries to manage her expected identity and her own shaky sense of self. Her perceived white privilege, mental health, ethnic identity, gender, and sexual trauma coalesce and reflect intersecting nature of invisibility.

Invisible: Sound Effect, Episode 31

Aug 8, 2015

Sound Effect is your weekly tour of ideas, inspired by the place we live. The show is hosted by KPLU's Gabriel Spitzer. Each week's show explores a different theme, and this week, our out-of-sight team of producers talk invisibility. 

To begin our show, we hear from Danny Dover, a Seattle author and tech entrepreneur. To combat a bout of depression, Dover created a bucket list. One of the experiences he tacked onto that list required him to become completely invisible. He wanted to become a pickpocket, and so he did. 

Then, KPLU's Jennifer Wing visits Camp Oasis on the Key Peninsula. The goal of the camp is to unite children who battle the same invisible illnesses: Crohn's and colitis. Because illnesses such as these often go undiscussed, young people can have a hard time connecting with others facing similar challenges. But for one week out of every year, Camp Oasis offers campers an opportunity to lift the veil and meet others like themselves. 

In this week's roundtable to discuss under-reported stories, host Gabriel Spitzer was joined by Peter Robison, Seattle bureau chief for Bloomberg News, Phyllis Fletcher, managing editor for Northwest News Network and Justin Carter, publisher of the Capitol Hill Seattle blog

For Robison, the story that deserved more attention last week was the uprooting of a small, longtime community of RV campers and auto-homeless who lived on Northlake Way near Lake Union. The city dismantled the community last week.

"It was families. It was people with children," Robison said. The larger issue speaks to income inequality and Seattle's growing  and persistent problem with affordable housing for low-income residents, he added.

The Wallingford near-lake area, over time, grew expensive around the encampment.

"Across the street (from the former encampment) is Westward, which is one of Bon Appetite's top new restaurants," he said.

Capitol Hill Muggles Seek The Snitch At Quidditch

Aug 7, 2015
Brieana Ripley, KPLU

In 2010, a friend of Eric Andres told him that some Northern Arizona University classmates regularly got together for real-life Quidditch games. The fact that Quidditch was a fictional game played by made-up characters in Harry Potter novels wasn't lost on the college junior. 

Andres said his first thought was, "That sounds stupid-awesome." So he went to check it out. 

Pamela Wible

Physicians are in the business of saving lives but they have one of the highest suicide rates of any profession.  An estimated 400 doctors a year take their own lives. Pamela Wible is a physician in Eugene, Oregon and she’s devoted a big part of her career to helping doctors cope with thoughts of suicide.

Ed Ronco, KPLU

Mama's Mexican kitchen in Seattle is going to be closing soon after 40 years in business. For its patrons, this means farewell to cheap, late-night burritos in Belltown, cozy booths and the Elvis Room.

But for Bella Biagio it's more than a loss of a business, a job or a building; She's worked there 18 years. So for her, it's the loss of family -- albeit an odd one she refers to as, "The island of misfit toys."

"We are the train with the square wheels. And the gun that shoots jelly and the Charlie in the Box," she said. "It's so dysfunctional but it works."

A lot of older Seattle is disappearing under the ceaseless march of urban development, she said. And the town is lesser for it.  There are not as many none corporate, "genuine" places in Seattle anymore, she said. Certainly not many like Mama's, a popular, divey Mexican eatery on the corner of 2nd Avenue. and Bell Street.

Déjà Vu: Sound Effect, Episode 30

Aug 1, 2015

 Sound Effect is your weekly tour of ideas, inspired by the place we live. The show is hosted by KPLU's Gabriel Spitzer. Each week's show explores a different theme, and this week, our ragtag radio team has curated another "best of" episode. 

Before things become a bit uncanny, we discuss the elusiveness of déjà vu with 50 First Dates Screenwriter, George Wing. 

From Episode 12: Lost and Found, KPLU’s Jennifer Wing unspools the story of Snowball, a frequently lost cat who was eventually found

From Episode 17: Coming Out, KPLU's Arwen Nicks interviews teacher and activist, Yaara Zaslow, about why she decided to come out as a rape survivor.

From Episode 3: Rain, we retreat to the forest to reflect on cooler weather with Ranger John Preston in the Hoh Rain Forest

From Episode 11: Flight, Korean astronaut and engineer Yi So-yeon tells KPLU's Gabriel Spitzer about her long journey from the International Space Station to Puyallup.

Aaron D'Errico

Aaron D'Errico had one dream as a child: To be a soccer star in the same manner as his father, David D'Errico, an original Seattle Sounder and former U.S. Men's National Team captain. 

But where Aaron's dreams went, his body couldn't follow. Born with cerebral palsy Aaron was never going to be a much of a soccer player, much less a professional. That wasn't about to stop him, however.

The Friday Harbor man put pen to paper and created Ammon Walker, a comic book superhero and super-spy who uses his status as a professional soccer star as his cover. Like Aaron, Ammon has cerebral palsy. But unlike his creator, Ammon has developed technology that allows his body to overcome it.

Teamwork: Sound Effect, Episode 29

Jul 25, 2015
mamas.com

 Sound Effect is your weekly tour of ideas, inspired by the place we live. The show is hosted by KPLU's Gabriel Spitzer. Each week's show explores a different theme, and this week our mötley crüe has produced stories for you about teamwork. 

Gabriel Spitzer talks with racer, Rachel Scdoris, about how she worked with a teammate to navigate and finish the Iditarod race even though she is legally blind.

Austin Jenkins

Washington state regulators are tightening their grip on medical marijuana this week by targeting dubious patient authorizations. But some clinics say the changes, which begin Friday, will put them out of business.

The new Cannabis Patient Protection Act requires any health care provider who authorizes more than 30 medical cannabis patients in a month to report to the Department of Health.

Ashley Gross / KPLU

To live in the Northwest is, to some extent, to roll the dice. If you lived through the 1965 Seattle earthquake, or the Nisqually in 2001, or if you just read the New Yorker article about the “really big one” destined to hit our region, you know this well: There are forces under our feet that could just shrug our cities off into the abyss.

The push and pull of continental plates is so huge compared with a puny little human. And yet, for a man named Kelcy Allen, the act of a child shielded him from the seismic forces. He’s spent decades feeling grateful to the boy who died saving his life.

Someone Saved My Life: Sound Effect, Episode 28

Jul 18, 2015
Tacoma Public Library

"Sound Effect" is your weekly tour of ideas, inspired by the place we live. The show is hosted by KPLU's Gabriel Spitzer. Each week's show explores a different theme, and this week is dedicated to stories about lives saved. 

Sound Effect, Episode 27: Origin Stories

Jul 11, 2015
Ammon Walker

  "Sound Effect" is your weekly tour of ideas, inspired by the place we live. This week's show is hosted by KPLU's Gabriel Spitzer. Each week's show explores a different theme, and this week we crack open origin stories.

To start off the show, KPLU's Arwen Nicks speaks with Roger Fernandez — a native storyteller, artist and educator. He shares with us part of a traditional Wampanoag creation myth.

Then, Gabriel Spitzer talks about the origin of the UFO phenomenon, spoiler alert — it started here in Washington state. 

You’ve probably enjoyed one yourself. The infamous “Seattle-dog” is an iconic entrée best enjoyed after traipsing around the city after dark. But where did this cream cheese laden hotdog come from? KPLU’s Matthew Streib tracks down the food cart vendor who spearheaded the local trend.

AP Images

From discrimination to density to wood, Gabriel Spitzer gets the underreported stories of the week from Jessica PartnowBryan Cohen and Joanne Lisosky

There's always interesting stuff in the news that gets overshadowed by the big stories. On Sound Effect we invite a panel a journalists to talk over their nominees for under-covered story of the week. 

This week Alex Hudson of the news and politics blog Seattlish noted that even though the heat wave is all anyone can talk about, there are dimensions of it that haven't gotten the attention they deserve, such as the outsize hazard heat poses for homeless people. 

"The city of Seattle has extreme weather plans that relate to cold weather, and there are no real plans that relate to hot weather," she says. 

Sound Effect, Episode 26: Growing Pains

Jul 4, 2015
File Photo

"Sound Effect" is your weekly tour of ideas, inspired by the place we live. The show is hosted by KPLU's Gabriel Spitzer. Each week's show explores a different theme, and this week we discuss growing pains. 

Tracey Croisier

When Tracey Croisier was five years old,  she began having seizures. 

Her family was living in Taiwan.  By the time she was nine, they had moved back to the United States. Her parents took her to a doctor. He explained to the family that her condition, epilepsy, was so severe it would prevent Tracey from ever driving, holding a job or living independently. 

And then the expert added that she should never have kids.

About 10,000 people visit southeast Washington state’s Hanford Nuclear Reservation every year. And after a few hours on the bus, some are dazed like tourists who’ve seen one Italian cathedral too many.

On those tours, they have guides. But even folks who don’t come to Hanford’s physical site have a "tour guide" -- someone who can translate the language of Hanford and its nuclear legacy: Liz Mattson.

Point Of No Return Cocktail Recipe

Jun 27, 2015
Kevin Kniestedt, KPLU

The Point Of No Return cocktail was created by bartender Keith Waldbauer at Liberty Bar on Capitol Hill. A fiery spectacle guaranteed as fun to drink as it is to prepare, the Point of No Return is a crowd-pleasing classic. 

What you'll need:

Sound Effect, Episode 25: Point Of No Return

Jun 27, 2015
Brian Yeager and Amelia Bonow

"Sound Effect" is your weekly tour of ideas, inspired by the place we live. This week's show is hosted by KPLU's Kevin Kniestedt. Each week's show explores a different theme, and this week we muse over the point of no return. 

To start things off, Kevin Kniestedt talks to Buta Sing about leaving his home and family behind in India after facing religious persecution. Sing is Sikh, and members of his religion face many challenges from the largely Hindu opposition.

Then, we hear from Tracey Croisier from A Guide to Visitors. At nine years old, she was told by medical professionals that she had epilepsy. This was the point of no return for many experiences in Croisier's life — driving, a job, pregnancy. Nearly two decades later, new medical insight restored paths she thought were forever obscured.  

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