NPR health

NPR Health
9:55 am
Fri November 30, 2012

WHAM! Doctor tries comic book to boost trauma drug

Drama ensues when doctors work to save patients bleeding from traumatic injuries.
Ian Roberts

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 9:44 am

When it comes to public health, there are bad ideas that seemingly can't be stopped and smart ones that don't get their due.

Often, the real trick to improving health is getting both patients and doctors to hear the right message and then do something about it.

So what's the best way to get the word out about a decades-old generic drug that could save the lives of critically injured patients?

Make a comic book.

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NPR health
3:31 pm
Tue November 27, 2012

HIV Infections Rise Among Young Black Men In U.S.

A young man places an oral swab into a solution to complete an HIV test during a free screening event in Washington, D.C.
Brendan Smialowski Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 29, 2012 1:11 pm

The latest data on HIV rates in American teenagers and young adults offer a sobering message.

While the number of new infections in the U.S. is relatively stable — at about 50,000 people each year — HIV is on the rise in young people under 25.

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NPR health
3:28 pm
Fri November 16, 2012

Beer, wine and spirits: When counting our liquid calories, are we honest?

Not surprisingly, men like these guys cheering Sam Adams love beer. But more women than you might expect do too, according to a new study.
Sarah Conard AP

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 5:07 pm

When it comes to tallying our liquid calories, we're not always so accurate. Does that tiny 5-ounce serving of wine really count as a glass of wine? (The answer is yes.)

So as the season of celebrations heats up, and holiday cheer is delivered in the form of bubbly, beer or booze, just how many calories are we consuming from alcohol on a random Tuesday night?

Almost as much as we get from soda, apparently — an average of about 100 calories a day. That may not sound like a lot, but it can add up.

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NPR health
9:15 am
Tue October 23, 2012

'Addictive' Cigarette Smoking Games On Smartphones Target Kids

In this iPhone app, players pretend to smoke a cigarette and then pass it to their friends.
Screenshot from Puff Puff Pass Lite.

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 8:41 am

You can do just about anything with your phone these days. Take an electrocardiogram. Confess your sins. Even smoke a cigarette

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NPR Health
8:15 am
Tue October 2, 2012

How some parents could learn adult daughters' birth control habits

An insurer's note could tip parents to their adult daughter's use of the pill.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 6:53 am

The 2010 health law removes one of the big barriers to contraception for many young women: cost. But if they don't feel confident that the care they will receive is confidential, these women may not take advantage of it.

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NPR Health
6:32 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Kids exposed to 'startling' amounts of background TV, researchers say

It might be time to pull the plug, even if she doesn't seem to be watching.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 2:51 pm

Parents, if nobody is watching the TV, please turn it off.

Researchers who conducted a national survey of kids' exposure to TVs droning on in the background say, "The amount of exposure for the average child is startling."

How much is it, exactly? Try just under four hours a day for the typical kid.

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NPr science
1:46 pm
Sun September 23, 2012

The Next Frontier For Elite Med Schools: Primary Care

Mount Sinai Medical student Demetri Blanas wants to specialize in family medicine. It is a new specialty offered by his medical school.
Jenny Gold Kaiser Health News

Originally published on Sun September 23, 2012 2:51 pm

Johns Hopkins, Yale, Harvard, Columbia and Cornell. What do these medical schools have in common?

Beyond their first-rate reputations, they're also on the short list of top U.S. med schools that don't have departments of family medicine. Elite schools have long focused on training specialists and researchers, but with the federal health law's emphasis on primary care, some schools are looking harder at family medicine.

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Shots - Health Blog
12:22 pm
Mon September 10, 2012

Let Sleepless Babies Cry (For A While), If They Want To

Getting to no more tears.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 2:18 pm

When cranky babies won't sleep, is it OK to let them cry it out?

The short answer: Yes, within limits.

Many parents these days try to help their babies learn to sleep better by letting them cry a little.

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NPR health
7:08 am
Tue September 4, 2012

Why Organic Food May Not Be Healthier For You

A shopper surveys the produce at Pacifica Farmers Market in Pacifica, Calif., in 2011.
AP

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 1:13 pm

Yes, organics is a $29 billion industry and still growing. Something is pulling us toward those organic veggies that are grown without synthetic pesticides or fertilizers.

But if you're thinking that organic produce will help you stay healthier, a new finding may come as a surprise. A new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine finds scant evidence of health benefits from organic foods.

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NPR Health
9:46 am
Thu August 30, 2012

Does Mother's Abortion History Affect Baby's Birth Weight?

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 5:16 am

Women who had multiple abortions before giving birth to a first child were more likely to have that child very prematurely or to deliver a child with a low birth weight, according to one of the first large-scale studies to look at the issue.

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npr health
7:12 am
Thu August 30, 2012

Subtracting Calories May Not Add Years To Life

A rhesus monkey eats watermelon, provided by zookeepers, at the Kamla Nehru Zoological Gardens in India in May 2012.
Sam Panthaky AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 7:34 am

Scientists have known for decades that lab rats and mice will live far longer than normal if they're fed a super-low-calorie diet, and that's led some people to eat a near-starvation diet in the hopes that it will extend the human life span, too.

But a new study in monkeys suggests they may be disappointed.

The long-awaited results of this study, which started back in 1987, show that rhesus monkeys fed a diet with 30 percent fewer calories than normal did not live unusually long lives.

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NPR Health
3:29 pm
Wed August 22, 2012

Officials Say West Nile Outbreak Could Be Worst Ever In U.S.

A map that shows where West Nile cases have been reported. Note that areas shaded white have seen no virus activity.
CDC

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 3:28 pm

As cases of West Nile virus continue to increase, authorities warned today that this could turn out to be the worst outbreak since the virus first showed up in the United States in 1999.

The New York Times reports that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is still unsure about "where and how far" the disease will spread, but so far there have been 1,118 cases and 41 deaths reported.

The Times adds:

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NPR health
7:07 am
Tue August 21, 2012

Oldest Americans living longer, and are fitter and richer, too

The latest data paint a brighter picture of aging in America.
Lisa F. Young iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 6:42 am

America's oldest citizens are generally getting healthier, living longer and doing better financially. But there's lots of room for improvement.

That's the take-home from an exhaustive picture of Americans over 65 put together by the federal government and released last week during the summer doldrums.

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NPR health
6:25 am
Tue August 21, 2012

The perils of teens sacrificing sleep for late-night studying

It may not be the best strategy to stay up late and cram. A new study finds that when teens don't get the sleep they need, all kinds of things can go poorly.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 6:01 am

High school students with heavy academic course loads often find the demands of homework colliding with the need for adequate sleep.

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NPR health
1:08 pm
Mon August 20, 2012

Planned Parenthood windfall funds breast health expansion

Radiologist Gerald Iba checks mammograms at The Elizabeth Center for Cancer Detection in Los Angeles in May 2010.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 2:05 pm

When the Susan G. Komen Foundation for the Cure moved to cut funding for Planned Parenthood's work to screen women for breast cancer early this year, the reaction was swift and furious.

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