NFL concussions

A federal appeals court has affirmed an NFL settlement with retired players that could cost the league $1 billion to handle brain-injury claims over the next 65 years, rejecting appeals from players who disagreed with the terms of the deal.

Bill Chan / AP Photo

'A turning point.' That’s what KPLU sports commentator Art Thiel calls the NFL’s admission this week that football head injuries are a contributor to long-term health consequences for retired players.

AP Photo

Seattle sports fans have a lot to look forward to in the new year. KPLU sports commentator Art Thiel spoke with Kirsten Kendrick about some of the big stories to watch.

Jennifer Wing / KPLU

 

The National Football League is giving $2.5 million to the University of Washington to study concussions in an effort to make sports safer. The donation, which helps advance work already underway at the university, will help fund the Sports, Health, Safety Institute.

Along with figuring out better ways to prevent and treat concussions, researchers will look at a variety of preventable sports health issues.

Tony Avelar / AP Photo

The shocking decision this week of San Francisco 49ers rookie linebacker Chris Borland to retire from the game over health concerns has shaken up the NFL.

KPLU sports commentator Art Thiel says it's time for the league to come clean about the dangers of the sport.

Gregory Bull / AP Photo

The tragic death of NFL star Junior Seau has raised some questions about whether the hard hits he was involved in on the field somehow contributed to his apparent suicide.

The body of the 43-year-old linebacker was found Wednesday. Authorities say he left a note, although the contents of the note have not been revealed. Police have confirmed that Seau was shot in the chest. Does that mean he wanted his brain to be preserved for research, similar to the wishes of another former player who recently killed himself?