Mount St. Helens

Dave Martin / Associated Press

A group of Northwest scientists are sprinkling the landscape around Mount St. Helens with high-tech sensors as part of a new effort to map the volcano’s deep plumbing.

Scientists have a pretty good understanding of what’s happening right under the mountain, where a big chamber periodically fills up with magma before an eruption. Now they’re looking deeper — down dozens of miles — to the tubes and tunnels that feed that chamber.

Scientists monitoring Mount St. Helens confirmed Wednesday that magma is on the rise and "re-pressurizing" the volcano in southwest Washington.

However, they also stress there are no signs of an imminent eruption.

The effects of the partial federal government shutdown are rippling across the Northwest. About 1,000 federally-funded Oregon National Guard members received furlough notices Tuesday, as did 850 Washington National Guardsmen and another 850 from Idaho.

Meanwhile, guests at hotels and campgrounds inside national parks have been told to leave by Thursday.

Visiting scientists from the country of Colombia have a warning for people living in the valleys below our Northwest volcanoes: Get educated about a rare but dangerous phenomenon called a "lahar.”

That’s the advice delivered to an attentive crowd in Puyallup Thursday night.

Earth scientists want to take a better look at Mount St. Helens' plumbing.

University of Washington Professor Kenneth Creager is leading a two-year study of the geology of southwest Washington that aims to identify the volcano's magma supply.

Bellamy Pailthorp photo / KPLU News

Saturday is the 33rd anniversary of the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens that killed 57 people, knocked down a forest and filled the sky and rivers with volcanic ash.

The mountain in southwest Washington may be the best known volcano in the state, but it's not the only one or the most dangerous.

VANCOUVER, Wash. — The Bureau of Land Management says a Canadian company could prospect for copper, gold and silver near Mount St. Helens with no significant impact on the environment.

TOUTLE, Wash. — Visitors to Mount St. Helens will be able to drive close to the volcano this weekend.

Just in time for another anniversary of the catastrophic Mount St. Helens eruption, the U.S. Forest Service is reopening an architecturally-striking visitor center. The Coldwater Ridge facility has been closed for the last four seasons. The center reopens next week with a new mission and purpose.

Coldwater Ridge was the first visitor center to open close to the volcano in the blast zone. That was in 1993. It was later eclipsed when another Forest Service visitor center -- Johnston Ridge Observatory -- opened even closer to the Mount St. Helens crater.