Kenneth Bae

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

Lynnwood’s Kenneth Bae is said to be reconnecting with family after two years in North Korean captivity. Seattle author Blaine Harden says the timing of Bae’s release is no accident.

Harden, who wrote the bestselling “Escape from Camp 14” about a young North Korean who managed to flee a forced labor camp, says the release of Bae and fellow American Matthew Todd Miller has to do with a recent dose of international pressure.

“North Korea is in the dock for its human rights violations,” he said. “This has got the attention of the government there.”

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

A Lynnwood, Washington man held prisoner for two years in North Korean is back home. Kenneth Bae landed Saturday night at Joint Base Lewis-McChord. He was accompanied by Matthew Todd Miller, another freed American prisoner.

Wong Maye-E / AP Photo

The Lynnwood, Washington man imprisoned in North Korea for "anti-state" crimes two years has been freed. 

U.S. officials say American Kenneth Bae and was released Saturday, as was Matthew Miller. Both are on their way home.

Kim Kwang Hyon / AP Photo

The family of a Washington man imprisoned nearly a year-and-a-half in North Korea says it's alarmed and saddened the country has canceled a second invitation for a U.S. envoy to talk about his release.

While reeling from that news, Kenneth Bae's sister Terri Chung said in a statement Monday the family is encouraged by a growing number of people calling for his freedom — the Rev. Jesse Jackson in particular.

Kim Kwang Hyon / AP Photo

Family members of an American missionary held more than a year in North Korea say they are encouraged by remarks from President Barack Obama.

Obama said in a speech Thursday at the National Prayer Breakfast that the United States will do everything in its power to secure the release of Kenneth Bae.

American missionary Kenneth Bae, who's been held for more than a year in North Korea following his arrest and trial on espionage charges, spoke to reporters for Western media on Monday, calling for the U.S. government to help win his freedom.

Courtesy Terri Chung

The sister of a Washington man imprisoned in North Korea welcomed an apology from Dennis Rodman after his comments suggesting the man may have deserved his arrest.

Rodman traveled to North Korea to celebrate the birthday of leader Kim Jong Un.

Kim Kwang Hyon / AP Photo

Dennis Rodman has apologized for comments about captive American missionary Kenneth Bae in an interview with CNN.

A day after the former basketball star sang "Happy Birthday" to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and led a squad of former NBA players in a friendly game, Rodman issued the apology Thursday through publicist Jules Feiler in an email message to The Associated Press.

The Choson Sinbo, Mun Kwang Son

The family of an ailing American who has been detained in North Korea for 11 months says he has had an emotional reunion with his mother.

Myunghee Bae was allowed into North Korea to see her son, Kenneth Bae, a Korean-American Christian missionary, at a hospital where he has been held since August. Bae's sister, Terri Chung, of the Seattle suburb of Edmonds, said Friday that the Swedish ambassador in Pyongyang attended the visit and told her it was extremely emotional.

The family of an American man detained in North Korea for the past 11 months says his mother is being allowed to visit him.

Terri Chung, the sister of Kenneth Bae, tells The Associated Press their mother has arrived in Pyongyang and was scheduled to meet with him Friday morning local time.

The State Department says North Korea has rescinded its invitation for a senior U.S. envoy to travel to Pyongyang to seek the release of a detained American.

Bob King, the U.S. special envoy for North Korean human rights, was due to travel from Tokyo to Pyongyang Friday to request a pardon and amnesty for Kenneth Bae.

The State Department says a U.S. envoy will travel to North Korea this week to seek the release of an American sentenced to 15 years of hard labor in the authoritarian country.

The visit by Bob King, special envoy for North Korean human rights issues, will be the first public visit by a senior administration official to North Korea in two years.

A North Korean media outlet has released footage of an interview with Kenneth Bae, the Lynnwood man sentenced to 15 years hard labor for what the regime called hostile acts against the state.

In the undated footage released via CNN, Bae said he is mainly working in farm fields, but only for eight hours a day. Bae stated his handlers are “considerate, so I’m not working too hard."

Associated Press

North Korea says an American citizen sentenced to 15 years hard labor has started life at a "special prison."

No other details were immediately available Wednesday about Kenneth Bae. Pyongyang said earlier this week that Bae informed his family on Friday that he couldn't appeal his April 30 sentence and that he asked his family to urge Washington to push for his amnesty.

Ahn Young-joon / Associated Press

North Korea says a Korean-American man sentenced last week to 15 years' hard labor smuggled in unspecified inflammatory literature and tried to establish a base for anti-Pyongyang activities at a hotel in the border city of Rason.

The statement late Thursday from an unidentified Supreme Court spokesman provides the most in-depth look so far of Pyongyang's allegations against Kenneth Bae. But it is still short on specific details. Bae hasn't made a public statement.

Pages