Jim Olson

Project Violet
5:01 am
Wed December 18, 2013

Seattle Scientists Look To Make Drug Research More Like Fantasy Football

Steve Brooks shows his three-year old daughter Eliza a drug scaffold based on a Petunia protein.
Gabriel Spitzer KPLU

Editor's Note: This is the second installment of a two-part series. Learn how scorpion vemon led local researchers to the brink of discovery of a new class of drugs in Part 1.

Consider the chemical elegance of a potato. Or a petunia. Or a horseshoe crab.

Somewhere in each of those organisms is a special little protein uniquely equipped to do what medicines do: barge in on biological processes and mess with them. With a little tweaking, it’s possible they could be trained to, say, keep cancer cells from spreading.

A few years ago, Dr. Jim Olson and his team at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center had figured out how to make those proteins by the thousands, but they hadn’t yet figured out how to pay for it.

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Drug Discovery
5:01 am
Tue December 17, 2013

How A Scorpion's Sting Led Seattle Scientists To The Brink Of Discovery

Dr. Jim Olson is exploring a whole new class of drugs, based on his work with a scorpion toxin that helps fight cancer.
Gabriel Spitzer KPLU

The Deathstalker scorpion is about the size of your palm. It’s yellow and surly, its venom a seething cocktail of neurotoxins.

And somewhere in that poison soup is a very special little molecule, called chlorotoxin, designed to penetrate a prey animal’s brain. That effect happens to come in very handy: while it’s in there, it sticks to cancer cells while slipping right by healthy ones.

Jim Olson, a pediatric oncologist at Seattle Children’s Hospital and a researcher at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, put that toxin to work.

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