Jazz and Blues

News about jazz, blues, Studio Sessions, and music samplings from jazz artists in the northwest and around the world.

Freddie Hubbard was one of the most powerful and expressive trumpet players in the history of jazz. He started playing professionally in his teens, moved to New York at 20, and immediately began playing with the top jazz musicians of the day, including Sonny Rollins, Quincy Jones, Eric Dolphy and others.

He is primarily associated with what's called "hard-bop,” a sub-genre that came after bebop and focused more on soul and blues and less on complicated chord changes. But he was at home in almost any setting, from the free jazz of Dolphy to the the big band of Jones and more.

smithsonianjazz.org

"No two people on earth are alike, and it's got to be that way in music or it isn't music. If I'm going to sing like someone else, then I don't need to sing at all." - Billie Holiday

Today would have been the 98th birthday of Billie Holiday, so I can't think of a better person to feature.

smithsonianjazz.org

"What we play is life. You blows what you is" - Louis Armstrong

While Louis Armstrong wasn't the first jazz musician, he is considered the father of us all musically. Like Charlie Parker, his importance to the music — to all music — cannot be overstated. He is one of the few people who changed the music forever, and he was the first true soloist in jazz.

smithsonianjazz.org

"Music is your own experience, your own thoughts, your wisdom. If you don’t live it, it won’t come out of your horn. They teach you there’s a boundary line to music. But, man, there’s no boundary line to art. I kept thinking there’s bound to be something else? I could hear it sometimes, but I couldn’t play it." - Charlie Parker

Bebop. This subgenre of jazz has become the defining style for the last 70 years. Over the years, other subgenres have come and gone, but bebop is still the yardstick by which jazz musicians are measured.

smithsonianjazz.org

"The language of jazz is built on small phrases — riffs that pass like coveted currency from one musician and one generation to the next. But every now and then, there comes a moment when that tried-and-true vocabulary no longer serves, and by rejecting it, an artist arrives at a statement that nudges or catapults the music in new directions." - Tom Moon, NPR

In order to talk about bebop, we need some historical perspective. So we'll start a few years before the beginnings of the bebop era, in 1939. 

smithsonianjazz.org

Today I have a little bonus for you, as I'm presenting for your listening pleasure TWO versions of the classic tune "Take the 'A' Train,” written by Billy Strayhorn for the Duke Ellington Orchestra. 

smithsonianjazz.org

Welcome to Day 2 of Jazz Appreciation Month! Today we turn our ears to Dave Brubeck, another one of the towering figures in jazz.

Brubeck had a 60-year career and played into his 80s before he passed away last year. Loved by many, he is one of the few jazz artists to cross over to a non-jazz audience. He released an album called “Time Out” in 1959 with his quartet that was the first jazz album to be certified platinum (1,000,000 copies sold).

Steve Korn

The Jazz Journalists Association announced on April 1 (no joke) its list of 24 Jazz Heroes for 2014. 

Jim Wilke, host and producer of KPLU's "Jazz Northwest" and PRI's "Jazz After Hours" is Seattle's Jazz Hero. 

Involved in the local music and radio scene since the early 1960s, Jim was inducted into the Seattle Jazz Hall of Fame in 1993, and won the prestigious Willis Conover–Marian McPartland Award for Broadcasting last year.

smithsonianjazz.org

In honor of Jazz Appreciation Month, I’ll be posting a jazz song of the day each day in April. Some of these songs you’ll be very familiar with; some may be new to you. This is a completely subjective list of some of my favorites, and I’m sure your list would have some overlap and some differences. That’s one great thing about jazz: there’s something for everyone!

Puget Sound Regional Archives

Seattle had more than two dozen jazz clubs at the height of the jazz era. Only one of them is still catering to live music: the 100-year-old Washington Hall.

Michael Ochs Archives / Getty Images

I belong to a Facebook group called “Jam Of The Week.” Each week, the group’s founder, a wonderful Portland trumpet player named Farnell Newton, picks a jazz tune, and any musician from anywhere in the world can post a video of himself or herself playing a one chorus solo over the tune.

In about a month the group had more than 10,000 members, and hundreds and hundreds of videos posted. (Check it out if you get a chance, even if you’re not a musician.)

The other day, one of the members posted the idea of using a pop song one week. The comments that ensued were varied, but many of the jazz snobs on the site reacted negatively to this idea, with many of them slamming pop music as a whole as vacuous and worthless to jazz musicians.

Like many jazz musicians, I spend a considerable amount of time teaching young people about the music. In the jazz community there is a strong “pay-it-forward” ethic, and most of my peers feel an obligation to pass on what we’ve learned to the next generation. This is just one of the many things I love about jazz musicians.

Even so, sometimes I wonder if the lessons of the jazz giants who came before me will be lost as we move 40, 50, even 60 years past the days when these giants moved among us. Every year we get further removed from Duke, Miles, Trane, Sonny, Diz, Monk, Blakey, Ella and Evans, and those that played with them or knew them personally. There will soon come a day when all the stories of and lessons from these jazz greats will be at least third-hand.

Muddy Waters was born in rural Mississippi, and learned his blues at the feet of Son House and Robert Johnson.

By the 1940’s he took that delta blues to Chicago and led the gradual transition to electrified urban blues. He then recorded “Honey Bee” in 1951 with just bass and guitar accompaniment. The sound was closer to the delta, but you can hear the beginnings of the more aggressive modern sound starting to happen.

Rooseveltjazz.org

Three western Washington high schools are among the 15 finalists in the annual Essentially Ellington competition and festival in New York.

Garfield High School, Roosevelt High School and first-timer Mount Si High School will compete against other finalists from around the country at the Lincoln Center in May. 

salsa.com

The Jazz Education Network (JEN) created a new award called  "Keepers of the Flame:  LeJENds of Latin Jazz." Presented at the annual JEN Conference in January, the award's first recipient was NEA Jazz Master Candido Camero.

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