Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton has not held a single press conference since the start of 2016, triggering charges that she's trying to duck questions from reporters on the campaign trail.

In a speech Thursday in Reno, Nev., Hillary Clinton argued that Donald Trump is "helping a radical fringe" — the alt-right — take over the Republican Party.

"From the start, Donald Trump has built his campaign on prejudice and paranoia. He's taking hate groups mainstream and helping a radical fringe take over one of America's two major political parties," she said. "His disregard for the values that make our country great is profoundly dangerous."

The Clinton Foundation is working now to "spin off" or "find partners" for many of its programs, including all international activities and programs funded by foreign and corporate donors, the head of the Clinton Foundation told NPR's Peter Overby. The "unraveling," which would be an attempt to prevent conflicts, would go into effect if Hillary Clinton is elected president.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are going to be all over America's TVs this week, but in very different ways.

Clinton has one day of campaigning on her schedule, plus an appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live. Trump, meanwhile, has four big rallies planned. And if the rest of the campaign has been any template, Trump's many speeches will get many minutes of airtime.

As Hillary Clinton began a meeting with police chiefs from departments around the country, she expressed gratitude to those on the force.

"They represent officers who get up every day, put on their uniforms, kiss their families goodbye and risk their lives on behalf of our communities," the Democratic nominee said at the Thursday gathering in New York City.

Donald Trump often questions whether Hillary Clinton is honest or trustworthy enough to be president. This week, he took up another line of attack: that Clinton is in failing health.

Claims about Clinton's health have circulated for years but have gained new traction recently, in part thanks to a comment by Trump and questions raised by Fox News host Sean Hannity.

Julian Assange says if the United States government sees him as a threat to national security, it should see Hillary Clinton as one, too.

In an interview with Morning Edition's David Greene, the founder of WikiLeaks called the Department of Justice's decision not to prosecute Clinton for handling classified information on her private email server an "incredible double standard."

Despite the vast differences between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, there were some striking similarities between the economic speeches they delivered this week. They both spoke in Michigan, where they both talked a lot about manufacturing, with both of them insisting that they would obtain fairer trade deals.

This post was updated at 5:10 PM

Hillary and Bill Clinton paid $3.2 million in federal income tax last year, a rate of 34.2 percent. Their 2015 return was released today by the Clinton campaign, almost five months after they signed it for filing.

The Clintons overpaid the Treasury and got a refund of more than $1 million.

Hillary Clinton's recent surge in the polls is being fueled in part by a demographic that President Obama lost handily four years ago — white, college-educated voters.

"In over a half-century, no Democratic presidential candidate has carried white voters with a college degree," said Michelle Diggles, a senior political analyst with the center-left think tank Third Way, who described the split between the white working class and whites with a college degree as "the most underreported story of this year."

THIS POST WAS UPDATED AT 4:01 P.M. ET

A fresh batch of previously-unreleased State Department emails are raising new questions about the relationship between the Clinton Foundation and the State Department during the years Hillary Clinton served as Secretary of State.

The parents of two Americans killed in Benghazi, Libya, are suing Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton for wrongful death, alleging the 2012 attack "was directly and proximately caused" by the then-secretary of state's mishandling of government secrets.

The lawsuit filed this week in federal court in Washington, D.C., argued that Islamic terrorists were able to track the movements of Ambassador Chris Stevens and plot the deadly siege because of Clinton's use of a personal email server to conduct government business.

Among the 3,000 people Hillary Clinton drew to a rally in Florida last night was the father of the man responsible for killing 49 people at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando on June 12, according to a local news report.

A Clinton campaign official tells NPR that the rally in Kissimmee, Fla., on Monday was open to the public. NBC affiliate WPTV identified one attendee as Seddique Mateen, the father of Omar Mateen, who was killed in a shootout with police after carrying out the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

Vice President Biden spoke to college administrators, chancellors, and student body presidents in a conference call Monday, the latest push in the White House's 'It's On Us' campaign to try and end sexual assault on college campuses.

"I'm calling about the need for there to be a climate change and a culture change on our campuses, which makes it clear early on that sexual assault violence, rape without consent, sex without consent, will simply not be tolerated on any campus in America," Biden said.

Addressing a joint convention of black and Hispanic journalists Friday, Hillary Clinton found herself wading through a Q&A session — a format that has become a rarity for her.

She mostly gave prepared remarks at the event, but when it was time for journalists in the audience to ask questions, her discomfort with press conferences emerged — with one question in particular.

Kevin Merida, editor-in-chief of ESPN's The Undefeated, asked Clinton: "What is the most meaningful conversation you've had with an African-American friend?"

Now here's a political endorsement you might not expect.

Hillary Clinton is the candidate who set up a private email server and was — in the words of the director of the FBI — "extremely careless" in how she handled classified information.

And her campaign and the Democratic Party just got hacked. Yet, prominent leaders in the cybersecurity industry are coming out in favor of Clinton for president.

The scene is something you just can't make up.

As both parties struggle with unity this election, more non-traditional endorsements seem to be coming every day.

Several prominent Republicans announced this week that they plan to vote for Hillary Clinton and at least one high-profile Democrat has backed Donald Trump. Crossing over isn't new — there have been Obama Republicans, Reagan Democrats and a number of other defectors across the years.

Now that the political conventions are over, its time to start thinking about the transition to the next president.

Yes, really.

As of August 1st, the federal government is making office space available to representatives of the Clinton and Trump campaigns to start making plans for taking over in January. If this seems a bit early, those who have been there say it's not.

"This is the most complicated takeover, not only on the planet, but in history," says Max Stier, President of the Partnership For Public Service.

As the presidential campaign heads into its final months, the U.S. is carrying out daily air sorties in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan. A major trade deal, the Trans-Pacific Partnership, waits in limbo. The U.S. has begun a long-term pivot to Asia and is bringing more Syrian refugees into the country.

Trang Nguyen

Hillary Clinton has accepted the Democratic nomination for president. And during her speech Thursday night at the party’s national convention, Clinton talked about the need to unify the country, saying all Americans are stronger together. She also laid out parts of her agenda if she wins in November, including her plans for creating jobs, reforming campaign finance rules and working with former rival Bernie Sanders to create tuition-free college for the middle class.

When all was said and done, Team Hillary had to be pretty happy. Their four nights in Philadelphia turned out better than almost anyone expected.

Thursday night featured an orchestrated symphony of praise for Hillary Clinton and a precision-bombing of her opponent, Donald Trump.

On Tuesday as Hillary Clinton's was officially nominated as the first major party female presidential nominee, women (and yes, some men) all over the Wells Fargo Arena in Philadelphia danced, cried, embraced and howled with joy.

The Democratic National Convention erupted into a deafening celebration over a woman being thisclose to the presidency, 240 years after the U.S. was founded and nearly 100 years after women got the right to vote.

Hillary Clinton accepted her party's nomination on Thursday, completing the field for an American political campaign without historical precedent.

Clinton, the first female presidential nominee for a major American party, has now officially become Republican Donald Trump's Democratic rival for the presidency of the United States.

Hillary Clinton accepted the Democratic nomination for president Thursday night, delivering a speech that lays out her plan to address terrorist threats and create jobs.

Mary Altaffer / AP Photo

Hillary Clinton made history Tuesday by officially being nominated as the first female Democratic presidential candidate at the party’s national convention in Philadelphia. The delegates from each of the states took part in a roll call vote to make it official.

After the vote was taken, many of the supporters for former candidate Bernie Sanders walked out of the convention hall. Washington state delegate Trang Nguyen was among them. Nguyen explains that she is still struggling with the idea of backing Clinton. 

Bill Clinton had a formidable challenge on Tuesday: to sell the American people on one of the most disliked presidential nominees in U.S. history. He had to "humanize" her, in punditspeak — Hillary Clinton is more of an idea or icon to people than a person, as NPR's Steve Inskeep suggested Tuesday night.

Maryland Democratic Sen. Barbara Mikulski and Georgia Rep. John Lewis will formally nominate Hillary Clinton for the presidency on Tuesday night, PBS NewsHour's John Yang and NPR's Mara Liasson report.

If there was ever a time to show party unity, this would be it. This week's Democratic convention is supposed to be about showing a party standing behind its presumptive nominee, Hillary Clinton — and it was headed in that direction by featuring a speech from Bernie Sanders on opening night Monday.

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