GPS tracking

Clark County is using GPS devices to track many of its vehicles.

Managers can check their computers and find the locations of building inspectors, animal control officers and maintenance workers.

KATU reports it's raising "Big Brother" concerns, but Risk Manager Mark Wilsdon says they're public employees, and if they aren't doing anything wrong there's nothing to worry about.

He says since GPS units were installed the number of completed jobs went up and so have fuel savings.

The Supreme Court has just ruled that police need a warrant if they want to place a tracking device on a suspect's vehicle. The court's decision was unanimous.

NPR's Nina Totenberg says that this debate has been a contentious issue in the digital age. Here's how she explained it to newscaster Paul Brown:

At issue here is the case of Antoine Jones, a Washington, D.C. night club owner. Police put a GPS tracking device on his car for 30 days. That helped authorities find a stash of money and drugs.