Food

Stories related to food in Seattle, including Nancy Leson's weekly commentary Food for Thought.

Be a recipe renegade!

Mar 20, 2013
Stein

Run wild!  Sure, if you've never made something before, it's a good idea to follow the instructions. But if the instructions look weird or include ingredients you really don't like, that's another story.

Recipes come from all-too-fallible humans. Take it from me that some of them can haul you right over the Foodscal Cliff. I speak from bitter experience.

It happens to the best of us. You drink one too many cups of coffee and, for the next few hours, you end up acting like a hyper preschooler who just can't sit still.

Which can be pretty inconvenient if it's, say, noon and you're at the office, or if it's midnight and you can't fall asleep.

Wouldn't it be nice if there were something quick and easy that you could take to combat the effects of over-caffeination? Something like ... a banana?

old-picture.com

This week's discussion was inspired by the TV comedy Portlandia  and its Brunch Village episode about an endless line of would-be brunchers. 

I have lurked in the lobbies of dim sum joints waiting for tables.  And once in a while I've been been willing to wait in the bar.  But queue up out on the sidewalk?  Uh-uh.  I've stood on all the chow lines I care to, thank you. 

It's no secret that many Americans have a fetish for big food. Whether it's a triple-decker cheeseburger or a 128-ounce Big Gulp, some portions in the U.S. have gotten freakishly large.

But not all of our supersizing is unhealthy.

Nancy Leson / Seattle Times

You don't need an oven to make great flatbread.  You can do it all in a skillet right on top of your stove.  Here's how:

Nancy Leson / Seattle Times

I can't believe that Leson got that "natural" style starter to work.  I've tried over and over again with no success.  Her success encourages me.  Maybe I'll try again. 

Nancy Leson

Making your own vinegar is not complicated, thank goodness, but it does require a  good starter. Seattle Times food writer, Nancy Leson, tells KPLU's Erin Hennessey how she makes her own red wine vinegar and why it's so special.

Nancy Leson / Seattle Times

Okay, this one isn't about food -- other than the food scraps that were embedded and festering in both my kitchen floor and Nancy's.  It's about floors -- and the amazing Air Sled appliance mover.  One of the coolest gizmos I've seen in many a year.

Hot legs!

Feb 6, 2013
Nancy Leson

I confess that though I've chewed my way through enough chicken wings to levitate a dumpster I've never had the official Buffalo Wing.   And now I may never bother.  Here's why:

Looking to cut back on the calories in your cocktail by mixing, say, diet soda and rum? Well, get ready for the buzz.

According to the results of a new study, this combination will leave you drunker than if you'd mixed the liquor with a sugary, caloric mixer.

Take a look at this remarkable graph — is it the stock market? Home sales?

Nope. Click on the blue box in the lower right-hand corner and you'll see that the blue line tracks the number of chicken wings that Americans bought at grocery stores over the last year. See that mighty surge of wing-buying in early February? Apparently, you just cannot have a Super Bowl party without chicken wings — millions and millions of chicken wings.

Say "Super Bowl" to Philadelphia chef and restaurateur Jose Garces, and he instantly recalls winter Sundays growing up in Chicago. "While my dad and two brothers and I were watching a Bears football game, empanadas would just appear in front of my lap," he tells All Things Considered for the Found Recipe series.

TURNER, Ore. - When a dog finds its first truffle -- the fungus, not the chocolate candy -- the sound you hear will most likely be the voice of a very excited dog handler.

And you might be as excited as Mia MacCollin of Bend if your pet showed an aptitude to find buried treasure. And treasure it is. The native Oregon white truffle can fetch several hundred dollars per pound at retail.

Keith Seinfeld / KPLU

What if fresh foods were easier to find in lower income neighborhoods?  Would that lead to less obesity and disease? 

King County has been testing this idea by offering store-owners a free “makeover” to help them sell fresh produce.

They discovered: selling fresh fruits and vegetables poses surprising challenges. Some are cultural, since many small stores are owned by recent immigrants. Others involve the hidden world of produce wholesaling.

wholeisticallyfit.com

Let's post lunch.   Take your best shot.  After all, who wouldn't want to see a picture of what you're eating?  Not surprisingly, some restaurateurs -- and some restaurant customers -- are not amused. 

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