Food

Stories related to food in Seattle, including Nancy Leson's weekly commentary Food for Thought.

Nancy Leson

Nancy and her colleagues at the Seattle Times must have had a ball testing the 14 holiday recipes they got from Seattle chefs. If Times photographer Ken Lambert's beautiful shots hadn't already made me psychotically hungr, the names of the dishes alone would have blasted my appetite into low earth orbit.

Happy Thanksgivikah!

Nov 27, 2013

It hasn't happened since 1888, and isn't scheduled to recur for about 70,000 years.  It's this year's Thanksgivikah—when Thanksgiving and Hanukah occur at the same time. This brings a certain creativity to this year's holiday menu, to which we all contributed.

Nancy Leson

The hoopla over the New Big Thing restaurant is replaced by the excitement over the Next Big Thing. And the next. But some restaurants exist outside the cycle of fashion and fad. They're the places that keep us coming back for more.  

Nancy Leson

For sheer utility, the Ziploc stands right up there with Velcro and duct tape. The web is full of sites like Weird Things to Do with Ziploc Bags. But I have a couple of uses for them that I haven't seen listed.

avlxyz / Flickr

Finally! It's nice and cloudy and cool and rainy. In this Food for Thought Nancy Leson and I talk about some of our favorite cold weather food.  Strangely, two of our favorites come from places where the weather is anything but cool.

Rachel McKee / Flickr

Nancy Leson isn't all that big on candy, but she is sweet on a new candy cookbook.

One recipe the Liddabit Sweets Candy Cookbook offers is for candy apples, and not those brownish toffee apples, either.  This recipe's for real-deal shiny red ones.

Nancy Leson

Betwen us, Nancy Leson and I probably have a greater number of rolling pins than we have pin numbers. I've got about seven of 'em rattling around in my rolling pin drawer. Leson stopped counting at well past that. But these days, pretty much the only one I use I cannibalized from a broom.

Nancy Leson

Near as I can figure out, the only difference is that fresh cider isn't filtered. It's brown and cloudy instead of brown and clear. Nancy just made some in the rig pictured above. 

In this week's episode, she lists just some of the many varieties of eating apples available around here right now.  But Americans didn't always grow apples to eat.

Dick Stein

OK, I admit it. I'm not big on throwing dinner parties. But Nancy Leson sure is, and in this week's Food for Thought adventure, she tells all about her last one. I must admit I'm envious. But at least I got those swell bandages.   

Here's a recipe for just one of the enticing dishes she served.

Heather W. / Yelp.com

So how long would you be willing to stand on line for a table at a popular restaurant? Ten minutes? A half hour? Longer? Not KPLU’s Dick Stein, as he tells Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson on today’s Food for Thought.

Nancy Leson

...Even though he should have. When I described her recipe on my old Jazz Kitchen feature, he swallowed hard and forced a  smile and an "...interesting." Then we both cracked up. 

And now, the authentic eat-it-if-you-dare recipe.

Nancy Leson

This week, Nancy Leson demonstrates Martha Stewart's clever method for peeling a whole head of garlic.  Nothing could be simpler. And not only is it easy and fun, it (wait for it...) really, really works!

Nancy Leson

I like everything made from tomatoes.  I just don't like the tomatoes themselves.  Or anything containing identifiable parts of them. 

Yet when Nancy Leson plied me with some of the  green tomato relish she'd made, I had to admit I liked it.  

Nancy Leson

This  Food for Thought installment is half about on-screen cookbooks and their various apps and half about clams.  In dreaming up a headline I started with Do Clamoids Dream of Electric... but that was as far as I could get. Which may be just as well. 

Anyway, Nance thinks that cooking from a screen is the way to go.  Even if  you don't agree, but you do like clams, read on.... 

Anna King

We’ve all been there. You’re hungry. You want something good, but there’s no time. You hit the vending machine for sugar or salt.

Two recent Washington State University graduates want to change that. They've launched an urban apple delivery service called Apple-A-Day, and it’s taking off.

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