Food

Stories related to food in Seattle, including Nancy Leson's weekly commentary Food for Thought.

A cook's secrets are meant to stay in the kitchen. An off-recipe substitution, a unique addition, an improvised technique — they often come from inspiration, or just a sense of craft, that can make a home chef both proud and protective. Luckily for us, Chris Kimball of America's Test Kitchen is happy to share the secrets he's picked up in more than 30 years of cooking.

Ever since  I acquired Molly Stevens' All About Braising  in '04 my copy has become progressively more stained, tattered and torn.  In fact, some of the pages are actually falling out.    That's how good a cookbook it is.  Now the long wait is over.  Five years in the making, All About Roasting  is out at last— and just in time for Thanksgiving. 

Justin Steyer / KPLU

In spirit of 11/11/11, last night I decided to pick up a bottle of Stone Brewing's latest release in their Vertical Epic series and crack it open at midnight.

Brewed with Anaheim Chilies, cinnamon sticks, and Belgian Flanders Golden Ale yeast (providing pretty intense clove and banana overtones), this beer is hard to categorize.

Dick Stein / KPLU

Hint: It has to do with baking.  But first take a look at picture #2 above.  I've had that picture for years and still have no idea what the thing is or does.  

If you do please share.  And now the answer to the question posed in today's headline.

Last weekend my wife asked me if I would make her some egg fu yung. "You want egg rolls wit' dat?" I asked.  Of course she did.  But why stop there?

Paul Gibson

When I heard this particular version was cask conditioned and then delivered in a keg I was intrigued. I've liked the big bold hops I've had in previous Whoop Pass pours and this one did not disappoint.

Nancy Leson / Seattle Times

According to Roger Williams, the founder of Rhode Island, the Narragansett Tribe  called it askutasquash, meaning  "a green thing eaten raw."  Of course squash comes in plenty more colors than green and usually we cook it. 

Here's two ways.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

SEATTLE – Some seafood sold in the Northwest isn't what it seems.

Mislabeled fish is more common than you might think according to the few cops trying to make sure you get the species you paid for. Now those who are on patrol are looking for higher penalties to deter fish cheaters.

Paul Gibson

For many, the month of October means falling leaves, ghosts and goblins and pumpkins on doorsteps. It also brings the release of a number of pumpkin beers.

A recent find here in Seattle was Big Time Brewing Company's Hopgoblin Pumpkin Ale.

Dick Stein / KPLU

I clipped the steamed minced pork with salted duck eggs recipe pictured above from a Honolulu newspaper decades ago. After a few years and much use I transcribed and pasted it, apparently with oyster sauce, to the inside of that cookbook.  

I'll post a more legible version further down so keep reading.

Dick Stein / KPLU

Which would you rather mix up some cake or waffle batter in? 

My birthday present, that stoneware beauty pictured above, or some soulless plastic thing?

Shira Golding / Flickr

Some people come over and you love ‘em, but you have to hide the plastic bags, Tupperware and the Teflon pans just so you don’t have to “go there” with them.

Some are organic only (especially with children), limited or no red meat, fish only or vegetarian or vegan (all by choice and principle). And now for a growing number of potential dinner guests, it's locavore, too.

cute cupcakes

In this week's Food for Thought Seattle Times food blogger Nancy Leson rhapsodizes over New York style cheesecake. Who knew there were so many other kinds?

The Bulgarians top it with smetana, not the composer but a soured heavy cream. Ancient Romans made it with honey and a cheese similar to modern-day ricotta. The Bavarian Quarkkuchen is put together with quark cheese, not the elementary particle but a cheese made from soured milk. 

It seems almost every nation on Earth has its own version of the waist-thickening wonder.

Nancy Leson

We've just about reached the end of the season for home-grown tomatoes in these parts – to which Nancy Leson says yes. But to supermarket tomatoes Ms. Leson says "Blah." I say "blechh" to all tomatoes and will not willingly eat one.

OLYMPIA, Wash. — Washington health officials say five people in the state got sick from eating raw oysters that were harvested from an area of Puget Sound's Hood Canal and distributed to 23 states.

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