Food for Thought

... and you don't even have to be Polish to make 'em.

Nancy Leson

I'd teach my kid to cook if I had one.  I  have cats instead and they're not interested.  But if you do have a kid, there are lots of ways to get them to do the cooking.

Nancy Leson

I'd define "kitchen gizmo" as one of those things that you buy on impulse, use a few times and then stash away in the closet – or in Nancy Leson's case – a basement freezer. 

None of us are immune to the lure of the kitchen gizmo, even though I claimed otherwise in this week's Food for Thought. 

Dick Stein / KPLU

I was tempted by a recipe I found on the web for Poor Man's Lobster which called for boiling sturgeon in lime soda.  Intrigued but dubious, I chose a less bizarre preparation. 

Cheryl DeGroot

That sturgeon shot out of the water like a Polaris missile late for its appointment with apocalypse.

This was but my second fishing trip in 50 years and I was unsure what to do. "What do I do?" I yelled. 

Wikipedia commons

Two  corn cobs walk into a bar.  They notice a third, shady-looking cob trailing them. First cob turns to his friend and whispers ...

Courtesy of Nancy Leson

It's not that I envy Nancy Leson for all the fancy restaurants she eats at on the Times' dime. What I really envy is her energy. 

Tad Doviak

With my wife Calamity Cheryl off riding the range with her saddle bum pals I'm free to run wild in the kitchen.

The 18th century's John Montagu, Fourth Earl of Sandwich gets the credit, but as we now know the sandwich was probably invented no more than five or ten minutes after the appearance of bread.

Call them what you will: wieners, franks, tubesteaks, Fourth of July must-haves. In this reprise of Food for Thought, Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson and our own Dick Stein discuss (burp!) everybody's favorite dog.

In this Food for Thought I had a lot of fun lording it over Nancy Leson about my garlic garden.

Nancy Leson

A happy restaurant experience comes from a combination of food,  people and  place.  While all that can come together as a lucky accident, more often it's the result of careful planning.

Photo and design by Justin Steyer / KPLU

She was bronzed, glistening and gorgeous beneath the merciless lights and I  knew she could be mine -- all mine -- for a lousy $5.95.  I had just one question. 

Nancy Leson

History records the nation's first diner as a horse-drawn lunch wagon in 1870s Providence, R.I.

Choose your poisson

May 25, 2011
Nancy Leson

Hope I'm not getting all touchy-eely and making a bass of myself but before I clam up and call for kelp I should point out that if you tuna in to this Food for Thought you'll be herring all about...

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