Environment

Environment
11:19 am
Mon September 12, 2011

Hecla mine clean-up settlement could also be mini-stimulus

A worker replaces contaminated soil with clean soil as part of the yard clean-up program in Idaho's Silver Valley.
EPA

An environmental clean-up settlement could also be a mini-stimulus for the Inland Northwest economy. A federal judge has approved the Hecla Mining company's $263 million settlement in one of the largest superfund clean-up projects in the country.

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Fisheries meeting
7:00 am
Thu September 8, 2011

Eat more sardines and herring to help fisheries, experts advise

Sardines are plentiful and tasty, suggest scientists at the annual meeting of the American Fisheries Society in Seattle.
bikehikedive Flickr

Responsible fishing and fish consumption were among the agenda items at the annual meeting of the American Fisheries Society in Seattle. The conference (in its 141st year) has brought thousands of scientists, wildlife managers and other experts together for five days of wide-ranging discussions.

One of the more intriguing messages: Eating more sardines may be one of the best things you can do to help keep the planet healthy.

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Environment
3:37 pm
Wed September 7, 2011

Pine white butterflies flit to new homes in Washington desert

Pine white butterflies are finding new homes among the newly planted trees in the Tri-Cities.
Lynette Schimming Flickr

RICHLAND, Wash. – It's been 30 years since the last outbreak, but now white butterflies are flitting between pine trees across areas of eastern Oregon and Washington.

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Environment
3:16 pm
Thu August 25, 2011

UW study finds toxins emanating from dryer vents

Researchers have found plenty of pollutants in dryer exhausts.
Kerry Lannert KPLU

The sweet smell from your dryer vent could contain toxic pollution.

A new study from the University of Washington found hazardous chemicals in the air after clothes were laundered with scented detergents and dryer sheets. At least two of the chemicals are considered carcinogens by the Environmental Protection Agency.

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Environment
9:20 am
Mon August 22, 2011

Illegal crab activity Puget Sound put crab populations at risk

With more people taking up crabbing in Puget Sound, the people who police the harvest are seeing an uptick in illegal activity. Officials say the illegal activity is a major threat to future crab populations.

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Education
5:10 pm
Wed August 17, 2011

University of Washington tops America's coolest schools

Students Rachel Malinen, Brady Ryan, and Elizabeth Wheat tend to their cabbage crop at the University of Washington. Student activists created the Campus Sustainability Fund, which support projects that increase campus sustainability.
Mary Levin UW

What’s the coolest university in America? According to Sierra Magazine, it’s the University of Washington.

The official publication of the Sierra Club has named the University of Washington the top university in the country for its initiatives to operate sustainably and limit its contributions to global warming.

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Noxious Weeds
4:48 pm
Wed August 17, 2011

Toxic weed rears its flowered head In Northwest

Tansy ragwort, a member of the sunflower family native to Western Europe, is toxic to horses and cattle.
Courtesy of Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board

This year's prolonged wet weather is having the side effect of re-invigorating a noxious weed. The Northwest is seeing a comeback of tansy ragwort, a toxic species of sunflower that farmers thought they had vanquished years ago.

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Environment
4:38 pm
Wed August 17, 2011

Plastic bag opponents make their case city-by-city

NEWPORT, Ore. – Advocates of banning plastic grocery bags are taking their cause to smaller cities. An effort to ban the bags statewide failed in both the Oregon and Washington legislatures this year.

Now, supporters are making their case to city councils across the Northwest.

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Fisheries
3:18 pm
Wed August 17, 2011

Efforts growing to control the smaller fish of the seas

School of Pacific Jack Mackerel at Santa Catalina Island, Calif.
Aleph1 Flickr

WARRENTON, Ore. – Perhaps you've had salmon, tuna or swordfish for dinner recently. Or maybe it's on the menu tonight. Every big fish that lands on your plate got that big by eating lots and lots of little fish.

If you don't have abundant small fish in the ocean, you won't have the big fish. That's why some scientists, fishery managers and advocacy groups are paying more attention to the small prey in the sea.

Some environmental group now also want tighter regulation, and that's making fishermen nervous.

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Employment
11:39 am
Wed August 10, 2011

Aberdeen biodiesel plant humming 24 hours a day

ABERDEEN, Wash. – A biodiesel plant at Aberdeen is operating 24 hours a day, producing fuel using canola oil from Canada.

The Daily World of Aberdeen reports the 4-year-old Imperium Renewables has recovered from struggles the past couple of years thanks to markets in Oregon and Canada driven by environmental standards.

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Killer Whales
9:15 am
Thu July 21, 2011

Inbreeding is new concern for Puget Sound orcas

Killer whales that spend their summer in the Puget Sound have been breeding within their own family groups.
Associated Press

Scientists have a new concern about the killer whales that spend their summer in the Puget Sound. The orcas have been breeding within their own family groups, which may mean the population is more fragile than scientists thought.

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Environment
3:20 pm
Wed July 20, 2011

Rising sea, stronger storms hammering West Coast shorelines

Where the shoreline might end up at Washaway Beach.
Washington Department of Ecology

With summer in full swing, area beaches see a lot of action. But the shores of the western coast of the United States may be hit with large-scale erosion in coming years, wiping out coastlines that provide protection from the surf, as well as pleasure.

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Environment
9:09 am
Fri July 8, 2011

Marlin, blue fin tuna could become regulars in Northwest waters

Shannon Hunter of Newport holds an opah caught last summer on the charter vessel "Misty." Opah is tasty fish normally found in Hawaiian waters.
Courtesy of Robert Waddell

NEWPORT, Ore. – Climate change may push fish native to the Northwest coast further northward and bring fish from southern waters up here.

That's according to a forthcoming study by American and Canadian fisheries biologists. They suggest West Coast fishermen will need to adapt to different prey if the Pacific Ocean warms as projected over the next fifty years.

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Business
8:40 am
Fri July 8, 2011

Deal suspends chicken cage ballot measures

OLYMPIA, Wash. - Animal welfare groups in Oregon and Washington are shelving initiative petition drives that could have required egg producers to give hens more spacious cages.

The Humane Society of the United States says it's hatched a surprise national agreement with the egg industry for the treatment of chickens on farms. This comes as a ballot measure drive in Oregon for the 2012 election was getting started.

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Environment
12:34 pm
Wed July 6, 2011

Big, crafty raccoon eating rare chickens, ducks, peacocks

This undated photo provided by Leo Pauly shows a raccoon that park officials are certain is responsible for killing about two dozen birds at the Pioneer Park Aviary, in Walla Walla, Wash.
Courtesy of Leo Pauly

WALLA WALLA – Walla Walla park officials are certain the predator that has killed about two dozen birds at the Pioneer Park Aviary is a big raccoon.

A motion detector camera showed the raccoon stealing bait from a trap.

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