Editor Pick

Jazz
7:43 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Could Thelonious Monk win the jazz competition named after him?

Pianist Kris Bowers performs in the 2011 Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition. He was later named the winner.
Brendan Hoffman WireImage

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 2:12 pm

Last week, the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz announced the 12 semi-finalists for its annual competition for young musicians, often seen as the most prestigious in jazz today.

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Environment
3:01 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Why King County held a party for a property tax

In 1984, the county used revenue from the tax to purchase the first 2,000 acres of the Cougar Mountain Regional Wildlands Park, a bit of which is shown above.
King County

Celebrating taxes is a pretty uncommon event, but the King County Council did just that yesterday to mark the 30th anniversary of a property tax and the more than 100,000 acres of public lands it has paid to preserve.

The council also made its praise of the Conservation Futures Tax official with a resolution honoring those who created the program to spend the money.

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Pollution
12:14 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Garbage from massive party closes popular Wash. recreation area

On this screen grab from KREM.com, the cause of the garbage on the Illia Dunes is apparent.

PULLMAN, Wash. – A popular recreation area along the Snake River near Pullman will not be open for Labor Day because it was trashed last weekend by hard-partying visitors.

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Conflict in Israel
6:42 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Israeli court rules activist Rachel Corrie's death was an accident

Rachel Corrie, 23, stands in front of a Palestinian's home to prevent it from being demolished
AP

Originally published on Sun September 2, 2012 8:28 am

An Israeli court sided with the government today, ruling that Israel was not at fault for the death of American activist Rachel Corrie.

Corrie's parents were suing for accountability and $1 in damages for the death of their 23-year-old daughter. Corrie was killed in 2003, when she stood in front of a bulldozer to try to keep the Israeli soldier manning it from razing Palestinian homes.

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Diversions
2:32 pm
Thu August 23, 2012

5 things that ticked off Seattleites in the early '70s

Hippies looking for a ride in 1971.
The Associated Press

It’s 1970 and the one thing really bugging one Seattleite – enough to make him/her write a letter and, apparently, leave the city – was hippies.

“Seattle got so bad with hippies, I just had to get out of that city,” the anonymous writer told Mayor Wes Uhlman.

In addition to hippies, we found four other things really bugging people in the early 1970s on the Flickr stream of the Seattle Municipal Archives – communists, smelly busses, the United Nations and protesters.

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What's in a logo?
10:39 am
Thu August 23, 2012

Microsoft unveils first new logo in 25 years

The new logo unveiled today.

Preparing for the “most significant waves of product launches in Microsoft’s history,” the Redmond tech giant has unveiled a new logo.

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contract negotiations
2:35 pm
Wed August 22, 2012

Boeing engineers file labor complaint; talks off to a rough start

A spokesman says Boeing is asking employees to shoulder a bigger portion of health care costs, as expenses rise, in order for the company to stay competitive.
Andrew W. Sieber Flickr

The union representing Boeing engineers and technicians has filed an unfair labor practices complaint against the company, charging that Boeing is trying to muzzle its union members as contract negotiations heat up.

The complaint filed yesterday with the National Labor Relations Board in Seattle says Boeing has threatened union members with discipline if they speak to each other about wages, hours and working conditions.

Boeing spokesman Tim Healy said the company hadn't yet seen the complaint, but he disputed the union's claim, saying no one from Boeing told employees not to discuss working conditions or wages with each other.

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KPLU diversions
1:35 pm
Wed August 22, 2012

Endangered whales invade California coastal waters 


A humpback whale lunges out of the water to feed on krill near a gathering of spectators just off a beach at San Luis Obispo, Calif., on Saturday.
The Associated Press

SANTA CRUZ, Calif. – Tourists from around the world are flocking to the Monterey Bay to catch a glimpse of the massive marine mammals, including impressive numbers of blue whales, the largest animals on earth.

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Coming out gay
11:32 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Seattle councilwoman dying of cancer comes out at 66

Former Seattle councilwoman Cheryl Chow said she feared the reaction of the Chinese community and her mother
The Associated Press

Former Seattle councilwoman Cheryl Chow has brain cancer and says she has one more thing she wants to do before she dies.

She told KING-TV she is coming out and telling people she is gay after being secretive for more than 60 years. She wants to encourage others to not be afraid to tell their parents or children the truth.

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Environment
1:44 pm
Tue August 21, 2012

Wildfires in Washington, Idaho continue challenging crews

Idaho’s Trinity Ridge Fire is burning more than 90,000 acres in the forests east of Boise.
Zane Brown/inciweb.org

High winds are challenging crews battling the Taylor Bridge fire in central Washington; and crews fighting the Trinity Ridge fire in Idaho are in a standoff with that fire, waiting for it to reach lower ground.

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Business
12:51 pm
Tue August 21, 2012

The kids love working in Seattle best, survey shows

This is where Millennials are moving to meet people their own age, max out their pay and avoid time-wasting commutes, according to PayScale.
Chris Tarnawski Flickr

Seattle is the best place to work in the nation for Generation Y (19 to 30 year olds), according to PayScale, a jobs and salary data analysis and employment website.

Geekwire, which tipped us off to the story, said Seattle outperformed what it identified as other tech hotbeds: Boston (#5), New York (#7) and San Francisco (tied for #9).

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Good reads
12:12 pm
Tue August 21, 2012

The city as engine: Energy, entropy and the triumph of disorder

Adam Frank stands atop of the Wilder Building in Rochester, N.Y.
Carlet Cleare WXXI

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 4:36 pm

Cities may be the defining element of human civilization.

The path from hunter-gatherers in the Paleolithic era 25,000 years ago to the high-tech, high-wonder jumble we inhabit today runs straight through cities. In traveling that path, our construction of cities has always been a dance with physics. In some cases, that physics was explicitly understood; in others, its manifestation was only recognized in hindsight.

As our cities have become more complex the physics embodying their behavior and organization has also become more nuanced, subtle and profound.

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election 2012
11:41 am
Tue August 21, 2012

More 'red' books (conservative) bought than 'blue,' Amazon reports

Screen grab from Amazon's page showing the sales of "red" books verses the sale of "blue" books.

Based on book sales, Republicans are dominating Democrats in most of the country (including Washington state), according to a new “election heat map” created by book retailer Amazon.com.

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Crime
9:09 am
Tue August 21, 2012

Everett man arrested in fatal parrot stabbing

EVERETT, Wash. — An Everett man has been arrested for allegedly stabbing his girlfriend's parrot to death with a serving fork.

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Climate change
3:00 pm
Mon August 20, 2012

Dash of salt in clouds may fight global warming, UW scientist says

John McNeill, via UW News

By Todd Bishop of Geekwire

A group of scientists, including a University of Washington atmospheric physicist, wants to test the theory that pumping sea salt into the sky over the ocean would combat global warming by creating clouds that reflect more sunlight back into space.

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