drought

Weather with Cliff Mass
11:19 am
Fri August 15, 2014

Mass: Summer In Western Wash. Went From Dry To Normal In Just One Week

Aaron Brethorst

A week of rain has turned what was a dry summer into a normal one, says KPLU weather expert Cliff Mass.

But don’t let the clouds and drizzle get you down. Mass says the forecast will progressively warmer and sunnier over the weekend.

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Weather with Cliff Mass
10:35 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Hold On Tight To Your Valentine: Wet, Windy Weekend Ahead

This photo shows Rattlesnake Lake near North Bend, Wash. on Feb. 8, 2014.
Jim Stiles

We’re getting the “weather we need,” so get ready for a wet and windy weekend, says KPLU expert Cliff Mass.

“Our water supply was well below normal,” said Mass, who teaches atmospheric sciences at the University of Washington. “Very rapidly, the snowpack is getting replenished in the mountains. The reservoirs are filling. And by the end of this week, I don’t think we’ll have to worry water for this summer or the coming fall.”

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washington agriculture
9:43 am
Thu October 4, 2012

Northwest farmers plant wheat in dust, hope for rain

The National Weather Service says the Northwest will likely see below normal precipitation through December. Photo by Scott Butner via Flickr

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 7:43 am

PROSSER, Wash. – Most of us may be enjoying the fall sunshine, but Northwest wheat farmers are instead wishing for a little rain.

Nicole Berg digs her clean-up-to-now nails into the dry crusty soil on her farm.

About four to five inches down, there still isn’t any hint of past rain.

A few farmers did get some showers. Despite high-tech forecasts, Berg says often knowing when to plant still comes down to a hunch, decades of experience and an old wheat farmer adage.

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ranching
11:36 pm
Sun September 30, 2012

Drought, wildfires force ranchers to look for efficiencies

University of Idaho Professor Rod Hill and part of the university's purebred herd. Photo by Tom Banse

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 2:33 pm

The people who raise cattle destined to become steak or hamburger on your dinner plate are feeling the pinch. Wildfires this summer have scorched more than a million acres of Northwest rangeland. In addition, the Midwest drought is driving up feed costs across the board.

Now ranches and feedlots are looking to cut their feed costs in the short term... And longer term, have an eye on making the cattle themselves more efficient.

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