Dave Niehaus

AP

The sudden death of Mariners' Hall of Fame broadcaster Dave Niehaus last November left a huge void in the team's radio booth. It's a void that will be evident this weekend as fans flock to Safeco Field for Mariners FanFest - the annual meet-and-greet with players and team personnel.

Since there is no one voice that can replace Niehaus, the Mariners have decided to use five this season. 

Ted S. Warren / AP

What would you say was the top Seattle sports story of 2010?   Sports commentator Art Thiel has come up with his top five, and he shared them with KPLU’s Kirsten Kendrick.

AP

The Seattle Mariners will hold a “Public Celebration of Life” for late broadcaster Dave Niehaus tomorrow.  Scheduled start is just after 1 p.m. Saturday at Safeco Field. 

Family, players and close associates will pay tribute to Niehaus, the only play-by-play announcer the team has ever had.  He died of a heart attack last month at the age of 75. 

AP

“I have never been so sad to lose someone I never met.”  The words of one Mariner fan on Facebook at a memorial page for the team’s radio announcer Dave Niehaus.  His death this week from a heart attack has affected a lot of people in the Pacific Northwest in the same way. 

AP

Seattle Mariners broadcaster Dave Niehaus, who became the living embodiment of the franchise in his 34 years behind the microphone, has died. Niehaus passed away after suffering a heart attack at his Bellevue home on Wednesday, according to his family. He was 75 years old.

Famous for his colorful and deft storytelling skills, Niehaus brought Mariner games to life with his passion for the game trademark phrases, "My oh My" and "Get out the rye bread and the mustard, Grandma, it's  grand salami time!"