Chinese immigrants

Americans craving kung pao chicken or a good lo mein for dinner have plenty of options: The U.S. is home to more than 40,000 Chinese restaurants.

One could think of this proliferation as a promise fulfilled — America as the great melting pot and land of opportunity for immigrants. Ironically, the legal forces that made this Chinese culinary profusion possible, beginning in the early 20th century, were born of altogether different sentiments: racism and xenophobia.

Paula Wissel

Hundreds of supporters waved as Chinese President Xi Jinping arrived in downtown Seattle today. As the motorcade zipped by on the way to the Westin Hotel, Tony Zhao held up a giant red flag with five yellow stars on it.

He was not the only one waving a Chinese flag. Some well-wishers held the red flag in one hand and the American flag in the other.

SALEM, Ore. - Rare, once-lost historic records about pioneer Chinese immigrants to the Northwest have found a new life online. The digital archive is hosted by Oregon State University. A Chinese-American civic group hopes the document trove can help families locate ancestors gone missing early in the last century.