Boeing machinist union members said 'Yes' by 74 percent to a new four-year contract – hammered out in secret – that will bring jobs to build the newest version of Boeing's 737 to Renton.

The yes vote begins a new era for the aerospace company and its most contentious union, ushered in also by the union's promise to drop a complaint it filed with the National Labor Relations Board. That complaint has been the subject of Congressional hearings and hundreds of news stories around the world.

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More than 30,000 Boeing Machinists are studying a proposal that would spell labor peace for the next four years if it’s approved. But  some union members are concerned about aspects of the deal.

Lingering questions

One of the top concerns among union members has to do with how solid Boeing’s commitment to Renton really is. Property near the factory where the 737 is built has been sold off over the years.

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. — Boeing has flipped the switch on the solar power array on the roof of its new South Carolina assembly plant.

Officials of Boeing and South Carolina Electric & Gas on Friday dedicated the 10-acre project which officials say is the largest rooftop solar installation in the Southeast, ranked by production capacity.

The array on the roof of Boeing's 787 final assembly plant generates 2.6-megawatts of power.

Scana Chairman and CEO Kevin Marsh said the array generates enough power for 250 homes.

Associated Press

Boeing and the Machinists union have apparently reached a four-year contract deal as well as a deal to build the 737 MAX in Renton and have the union’s labor complaint dropped.

“We look forward to new era of prosperity for IAM and Boeing,” said Tom Wroblewski, president of Machinists Union District 751.

Wroblewski added that the secret meetings started out as conversations about the 737 and evolved into a full-blown contract deal because outside influences were dampened and the negotiation climate was right.

Boeing is moving 80 senior executives and support staff in the Commercial Airplane Group from offices in Renton to downtown Seattle.

It’s a big week for aviation biofuels.

A United flight took off Monday from Houston, for the first time burning jet fuel that was made from algae-based oil. And Alaska Air begins its demonstration flights from Seattle tomorrow (Wednesday, 2 p.m.)  – with fuel made from used cooking oil. 


The same day Boeing announced it is employing more than 80,000 workers in Washington for the first time in nearly a dozen years, Sen. Maria Cantwell said the state needs 21,000 more educated and trained workers to fill jobs in the aviation industry in the next decade.


There were delays until the very end. Boeing’s first 787 headed for its new home in Tokyo about 45 minutes behind schedule this morning.

The Dreamliner will begin active service for Japan’s All Nippon Airways about a month from now. And Boeing is banking on years of research and design modifications in the new 787 to "wow" carriers and passengers alike.  

Vanessa Romo / KPLU

It’s years behind schedule and over budget but Boeing’s 787 Dreamliner is now approved to carry passengers.

Federal Aviation Administration officials gave their official seal of approval amid swelling music, a flag parade, and a fly over by Airplane Number 2.

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. – Boeing workers in North Charleston are assembling the first new 787 to be made in South Carolina.

Boeing has received safety clearance from the U.S. and Europe for the 747-8 freighter, clearing the way for the plane to be delivered to its first customer next month.

The chairman of the House Oversight committee has subpoenaed documents from the National Labor Relations Board relating to its lawsuit against Boeing Co.

Associated Press

American Airlines placed the largest aircraft order in history – 460 new planes. It split those orders between the European aircraft maker Airbus and Washington’s own Boeing. But whether or not it’s a good thing for the local aerospace company is all in how you look at it.

Andrew W. Sieber / Flickr

For the fifth time, Boeing has stopped deliveries of airplane sections for its 787 Dreamliner from suppliers to the assembly line, once again slowing production.

The state Department of Ecology says it has fined the Boeing Co. more than $100,000 for a 300-gallon jet fuel spill in to the Duwamish waterway.

According to the department, the spill happened in May, 2010 at Boeing fuel terminal in south Seattle. It says that workers were delivering to a storage tank when they noticed the spill. However, they thought the spill had been contained to Boeing's property.