Bald eagle

After tens of thousands of votes, the pair of eaglets born in the National Arboretum last month now have official names. Freedom and Liberty won, beating out other options such as Stars and Stripes.

The eagles have been very popular. Since February, more than 35 million people have watched them progress from eggs to hatchlings to eaglets, according to the American Eagle Foundation, which set up cameras near the birds' nest in the arboretum in Washington, D.C.

The best-loved baby bird in the nation's capital is about to have some competition.

As we've previously reported, "Mr. President" and "First Lady," a mated pair of bald eagles in the National Arboretum in D.C., have been incubating two eggs before a rapt audience, thanks to a 24-hour web cam.

After days of anticipation, a fuzzy wing flopped out of the remains of an egg shell Friday morning, signaling the hatching of a baby bald eagle who's been watched and fretted over, via an eagle cam set up at the National Arboretum in Washington, D.C.

The bird then worked its way out of its shell over the next hour, emerging more fully around 8:20 a.m. ET. Throughout the process, its parent eagle alternated between peering attentively (to be honest, eagles don't seem capable of anything but) and nestling over the fledgling and a second, as-yet-unhatched, egg.

One of two eggs laid by a mated pair of bald eagles in Washington, D.C., is hatching, according to officials watching the nest at the U.S. National Arboretum.

"We have a pip in process!!" said an update sent by the American Eagle Foundation on Thursday morning, which clarifies, "It's not technically a full pip until there is a full hole."

The hole in the shell appears to have grown larger as of mid-afternoon Thursday, but the eaglet has yet to emerge. The group says it could take between 12 and 48 hours for the eaglet to fully emerge from the shell.

A mated pair of bald eagles that have nested in the U.S. National Arboretum since 2014 are now starting a family, taking turns incubating two eggs — and one of them could hatch sometime Tuesday. Two webcams are currently trained on their nest in Washington, D.C.

You can watch the webcam online — we'll note that the American Eagle Foundation warns, "This is a wild eagle nest and anything can happen."

It’s always pretty special to see an eagle soaring near the water. But summer revelers in Seattle were recently shocked when they saw two of the large birds fighting in mid-air, dive-bombing each other at Seward Park. 

Bald Eagle: A Mighty Symbol, With A Not-So-Mighty Voice

Jul 3, 2012

Few sounds symbolize American patriotism like the piercing shrill of a bald eagle. But just like George Washington and his cherry tree, that majestic call … is a myth. The screech associated with the bald eagle, in fact, belongs to a different bird.

Bird expert Connie Stanger blames Hollywood. You know the scene:

Stanger describes it: “You’ve got John Wayne riding through the sunset and you hear the jingle of spurs and often that piercing, loud cry.”

SPOKANE, Wash. — Scientists at Washington State University were able to save a bald eagle that was found in Idaho suffering from lead poisoning, and this week they released the majestic predator back into the wild.

Karen Morris / Flickr

OLYMPIA, Wash. — The Washington Forest Practices Board plans to remove the bald eagle and peregrine falcon from the state critical habitat list to be consistent with federal and state endangered species laws.

The board will listen to testimony on the changes at hearing Jan. 3 in Olympia and Jan. 5 in Ellensburg.

Air Line Pilots Association / Flickr

Two Washington pilots are getting recognition for safely handling a jet that collided with an eagle last year. One of the plane's engines exploded when the bird flew into it.

Alaska Airlines Captain Steve Cleary of Federal Way and First Officer Michael Hendrix of Seattle won the Superior Airmanship Award from the Airline Pilots Association.

Associated Press

A bald eagle was struck and killed Tuesday on the Highway 520 floating bridge in Seattle. The eagle is believed to be the male of a pair that nests at the nearby Broadmoor Golf Course in Seattle.

Frequently seen perching on bridge light poles, it was popular with commuters.