Artscape

Artscape
7:59 am
Mon October 25, 2010

Artscape: Implied Violence is Arresting Theater

The performance art that is Implied Violence, at Seattle's Frye Art Museum, also produces intriguing props, such as this wax chair pierced with arrows.
Steven Miller photograph

 A new exhibit at Seattle's Frye Art Museum is full of items rich in double meaning. Like a large wax chair full of hundreds of arrows. Or a jar full of medicinal leeches. 

And then there's a stunner of a dress that stops you as soon as you walk in through the door. "You'll see a really beautiful dress, with wide wide sides. And it looks very sheer. It's organza," says Frye deputy director Robin Held. 

"Now the surface of the dress looks like it's covered in bugs."

It's actually covered with more than 2,500 black bows. But it doesn't stop there.

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Artscape
5:12 pm
Sun August 8, 2010

Artscape: A Barn, Some Donkeys and Chamber Music

In addition to chamber music, the Olympic Music Festival offers patrons a chance to meet -- and feed -- its donkeys.
Florangela Davila KPLU

It's 24 hours before performance time out here on the Olympic Peninusula, so while the grounds are getting soaked by sprinklers, I walk into a barn being bathed in Mozart.

A string quartet rehearses -- A pair of violinists, a cellist, a violist - all focused on perfecting music written for an intimate setting.

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Artscape
12:00 am
Sun August 1, 2010

Artscape: Keeping Jazz in the Family

Ellis Marsalis is joined by his two sons Branford, left, and Wynton, right.
AP

If you love jazz, then you know it's often a family affair. Here's one example: the Heath Brothers Quartet performed this weekend at Jazz Port Townsend, with Jimmy Heath on tenor saxophone and Tootie Heath on drums. Along with their late brother Percy, the Heaths are just one of the great sibling stories in jazz. In this week's installment of our Artscape series, KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and Nick Morrison discuss more musical families as part of a list that Nick prepared for NPR.

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Artscape
12:00 am
Sun July 25, 2010

Artscape: A Refugee's Journey of Survival and Hope

Anyone who has lived in a refugee camp has had a picture taken of him or her with his or her identification number.
Souchinda Viradet Khampradith, Chakrya Lim, Choy Vong and Sam Ung Courtesy Photo

On April 30th, 1975, the Vietnam War ended. But that was only the beginning for millions of Vietnamese, Laotians and Cambodians, as they desperately found ways to leave their war torn countries. An account of refugees' struggles and hardships is now on exhibit at Seattle's Wing Luke Museum. This is the story of two refugees who came here to start a new life.

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Artscape
12:00 am
Sun July 11, 2010

Artscape: Seattle Theater's Newest Artistic Director

Kate Whoriskey is in her first season as artistic director at Seattle's Intiman Theatre.
Chad Batka Courtesy Photo

For the first time in her theatrical career, Kate Whoriskey can contemplate decorating an office. Because now she actually has one.

"I'm trying to work on posters and I'm hoping to do something with the ceiling. Because it's a little bit barren," she says.

Except for an orchid and a couple of stuffed animals for her 21- month-old son Rory, there isn't much else personalizing her new space. But she's still transitioning - from New York theater freelancer to artistic director at Seattle's Intiman Theatre.

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Artscape
4:19 pm
Sun July 4, 2010

Artscape: Making Art After Trauma

Bret Walker, who suffered a traumatic brain injury in 1993, at home in Seattle.
Cass Walker Courtesy Photo

The photos stand in a homey, makeshift gallery. On the floor of a garage in Clyde Hill. Owner Cass Walker has moved the cars out of the way to make room for her series of large mostly black- and-white images that tell the story of her older brother Bret.

View the full story, along with images and audio.

Artscape
11:45 am
Sun March 14, 2010

Portraits of the Fallen

Michael Regan
Liam Moriarty KPLU

For most of his career, Edmonds artist Michael Reagan drew life-like portraits of the rich and famous; movie stars, sports figures, six presidents, the Pope. But several years ago, he started drawing pictures of American soldiers killed in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and offering them free to the families.

The artist - who's also a Vietnam vet -- feels this gift to the loved ones left behind is a kind of healing, not only for the families, but for himself.

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