Arts

The Two-Way
9:58 am
Wed September 26, 2012

City Folk Are More Likely To Read This Post

Remember these? They're most important to those who live in small towns, a new survey shows.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 9:24 am

Reinforcing some things you might have suspected, the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism and Internet & American Life Project, along with the Knight Foundation, report today that a national telephone survey of adults finds:

Read more
Photography
6:40 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Re-tracing the steps of a Civil War photographer on the anniversary of Antietam

Alexander Gardner captured the Confederate dead along the Hagerstown Pike at Antietam. One hundred fifty years later, sorghum lines what is now a paved road.
Todd Harrington and Alexander Gardner Library of Congress

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 10:31 am

Today's 150th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam got us thinking: What if Civil War photographer Alexander Gardner could revisit some of the original sites he photographed? If he used his equipment today, what would the images look like? That is: How have the landscapes changed — or stayed the same?

How These Work

Read more
Books News & Features
8:43 pm
Sun September 16, 2012

A father's decades-old bedtime story is back in print

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 11:13 am

One night in 1947, an intensely curious 5-year-old boy named Michael McCleery asked his father for a story. So his father, William McCleery, produced a tale that revolved around a wolf named Waldo, a hen named Rainbow, and another little boy, the son of a farmer, named Jimmy Tractorwheel. Over weeks and weeks, William serialized the story, telling it in installments to Michael and his best friend during bedtimes and Sunday afternoon outings.

Read more
Author Interviews
7:04 am
Tue September 11, 2012

Stories from a new generation of American soldiers

Yellow Birds book cover detail

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 6:57 am

Iraq War veteran Brian Castner opens his new memoir, The Long Walk, with a direct and disturbing warning:

"The first thing you should know about me is that I'm Crazy," he writes. "I haven't always been. Until that one day, the day I went Crazy, I was fine. Or I thought I was. Not anymore."

More than 10 years since a new generation of Americans went into combat, the soldiers themselves are starting to write the story of war. Three recent releases show how their experiences give them the authority to describe the war, fictionalize it and even satirize it.

Read more
Author Interviews
6:34 am
Mon September 10, 2012

'End of Men' heralds new era of female dominance

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 11:47 am

Women have fought tirelessly to establish equal footing for themselves in relationships, politics and the workplace, and according to writer Hanna Rosin, they've finally arrived.

In her new book, The End of Men: And The Rise of Women, Rosin argues that the U.S. has entered an era of female dominance.


Interview Highlights

On how the rise of women is largely an economic story

Read more
Arts
1:56 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Why build a wall out of Jell-O?

Jell-O brick wall under construction at the Seattle Center grounds near the Monorail station.
Paula Wissel KPLU

Just steps away from the Monorail station at the Seattle Center, a wall is being constructed out of Jell-O.  A lightweight mortar holds the raspberry, orange and blackberry fusion "bricks" in place.   

The Jell-O brick wall is the work of sculptors Lisa Hein and Robert Seng. It was commissioned as part of the 50 year celebration of the Seattle World's Fair.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:02 pm
Fri August 24, 2012

Jerry Nelson, Puppeteer For Sesame Street's Count Von Count, Is Dead

Jerry Nelson and the character he brought to life, Count von Count.
Larry Busacca Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 1:43 pm

Read more
Books
8:27 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Searching for 'Bernadette' in the wilds of Seattle

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 8:56 am

The narrator of Maria Semple's newest book, Where'd You Go, Bernadette, is 15-year-old Bee Fox. She's a nice kid, a good musician and a great student. In fact, she's such a great student that her parents have promised her anything she wants — and she chooses a family trip to Antarctica.

Read more
World's Fair Anniversary
4:15 pm
Wed August 22, 2012

#topthis – Public to design the Space Needle’s top

Can you do this better? The Space Needle's owners want you to try.
The Associated Press

The roof of Seattle's iconic Space Needle was repainted on Tuesday with the message "top this" to promote a new contest in honor of the 50th anniversary of the 1962 World's Fair.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:20 am
Fri August 17, 2012

Two-Year Prison Terms For Russia's Pussy Riot Rockers

Members of the all-girl punk band Pussy Riot: Nadezhda Tolokonnikova (right), Maria Alyokhina (center) and Yekaterina Samutsevich (left) in a glass-walled cage during a court hearing in Moscow earlier today.
Andrey Smirnov AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 9:19 am

A Russian judge today found three members of the punk rock band Pussy Riot guilty of hooliganism connected to "religious hatred."

Word of the verdict came just before 7:30 a.m ET. Just before 10 a.m. ET, the judge announced that each woman was sentenced to serve two years in jail — the minimum that could be imposed.

Read more
Arts
3:08 pm
Mon August 13, 2012

Seattle tattoo expo shows it's hard to stop at one

A Good Karma Body Art artist adding on to previous upper back tattoo.
Mallory Kaniss KPLU

Around 5,000 tattoo enthusiasts gathered at the Seattle Tattoo Expo this weekend to celebrate the art of tattooing, and maybe even get inked themselves. Tattoo artists completed more than 1,500 new tattoos throughout the weekend.

We saw a lot of people with multiple tattoos and that made us wonder: Once you get one tattoo, is it hard to stop?

"There's certainly an addictive quality to the whole process,” said Jeff Cornell, a tattoo artist.

Read more
Arts
5:00 am
Thu August 9, 2012

How do you move a four-ton street clock?

A worker prepares Carroll's Clock for the move.
Lindsay Lowe KPLU

The Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) is in the process of moving from Seattle’s Montlake neighborhood to the Armory building in South Lake Union.

MOHAI has been around for nearly 60 years, and some people call it “Seattle’s attic.” It has a huge collection of historical objects from the Puget Sound region.

The museum has transported over 50,000 pieces already, and not all of them fit inside a box.

Here are just a few of the things they've moved:

- The first commercial Boeing airplane ever built

Read more
Books
6:20 am
Tue August 7, 2012

Top 100 Teen Books

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 1:14 pm

More than 75,000 ballots were cast in our annual summer reader's survey — click here to see the full list of 100 books, complete with links and descriptions. Below is a printable list of the top 100 winners. And for even more great reads, check out the complete list of 235 finalists.

1. Harry Potter (series), by J.K. Rowling

Read more
100 Best Books
6:20 am
Tue August 7, 2012

Your Favorites: 100 best-ever teen novels

Harriet Russell

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 11:50 am

It's almost a cliche at this point to say that teen fiction isn't just for teens anymore. Just last year, the Association of American Publishers ranked Children's/Young Adult books as the single fastest-growing publishing category.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:14 am
Wed August 1, 2012

Gore Vidal, In Words

Gore Vidal in 1991. He died Tuesday, at the age of 86.
Central Press Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 1, 2012 4:16 am

The death of writer and cultural critic Gore Vidal on Tuesday, at the age of 86, means many are trying today to capture that man of words' life in just a few phrases:

Read more

Pages