What fireworks can you use? In some cities: None

Jul 1, 2011

Here comes that day that cats and dogs really hate, but most American humans love!

Yes, it’s time for burning, smoking and exploding devices used for celebrating the Fourth of July. It is also time for the many reminders and warnings about what fireworks you can use, how dangerous they are and where you can or can’t use them (should you really feel like you have to).

Simply, they're dangerous

Many cities have banned fireworks altogether, such as Seattle, Tacoma and Spokane. Check here for the full list of cities with restrictions and bans. Here is a very colorful graphic showing the various types of fireworks that can be sold in the state (but not exploded legally in Seattle or Tacoma!). Here is the list in a much more legal-looking document.

The King County Fire Chiefs Association wants to be absolutely clear about it too: In cities where fireworks are banned – “This makes possession or discharge of any fireworks illegal within the city limits.”

Once more, with feeling: “Fireworks can be a lot of fun – but they’re also very dangerous.”

Go public

That’s the message from fire chiefs in the northwest, who are urging families to consider attending public displays, rather than lighting fireworks at home. 

Randy Krause, with the King County Fire Chiefs’ Association, says an average of 200 people statewide are injured every year by fireworks.  He says if you do light your own, which he doesn’t advise, be careful. You can’t trust fireworks – even smoldering fireworks have been known to explode in people’s hands.

And nearly half of all injuries are caused by legal fireworks – so it’s important to be careful with anything you’re lighting up, which you won’t being doing in Seattle or Tacoma because it is illegal! 

To tempt you into going to public displays of fireworks, the chiefs had compiled a complete list of fireworks displays and events in the Puget Sound region.

People who didn't listen: