Wednesday morning's headlines

Jan 26, 2011

Making headlines this morning:

  • A Little Pot With Your Booze?
  • Boeing Announces 2011 Profit Projections
  • State Parks Facing Tough Budget

 

Should the state legalize marijuana sales?

The idea has the backing of some state legislators who filed legislation Tuesday. It would allow state liquor stores to sell pot. KING-TV reports the bill's chief backer is Seattle Democrat Mary Lou Dickerson:

“There really is a great comparison between the prohibition of alcohol in the 1920s and what we’ve been doing with marijuana now,” says Dickerson. “We need to regulate it, get it out of the hand of criminals and drug cartels and tax it.”

House Bill 1550 would have the state license pot growers. The bill will get a public hearing. Attorney General Rob McKenna tell KING he'll oppose it. 

 

Boeing  787 Delays Will Hurt 2011 Profits

The company blames delays in Dreamliner production and delivery timelines as well as higher pension expenses for lower projected earnings in 2011.  The Herald of Everett's Michelle Dunlop reports the company expects share prices well below Wall Street projections, at $3.80 to $4. In a statement, Boeing CEO Jim McNerney says the company will deliver up to 500 planes this year:

"Our focus for the year is to deliver the 787 and 747-8; manage disciplined increases in commercial airplane production rates and drive improved competitiveness and financial performance throughout the business," McNerney said.

McNerney estimates pension expenses will increase this year. The news helped send Boeing stock lower in premarket trading today, according to the Herald.

 

Ideas Fly on How to Fund State Parks

A new vehicle fee on park users would need to raise enough money to keep the system thriving. It's one of the ideas floating around Olympia to keep parks open. The Seattle Times' Queenie Wong reports on the governor's proposal of an access fee for park users, monitored by the Department of Licensing. You could buy a park vehicle access permit when you renew your license. 

"If we don't raise the money, we're not going to have a park system," said Virginia Painter, a spokeswoman for the Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission, which runs the state's parks.

The Times reports people who access parks on foot or bicycle would not be required to pay the fee, and out-of-state drivers would pay a separate use fee. 

A separate proposal by San Juan Island Democrat Kevin Ranker would impose annual vehicle and day-use fees for people accessing state parks, recreation areas and sites managed by the Fish and Wildlife, and Natural Resources departments.