Tuesday morning's headlines

May 24, 2011

Partly sunny Tuesday; high near 66. Latest forecast here.

Making headlines around the Northwest:

  • Man Missing in Snoqualmie River Presumed Drowned
  • Lake Washington HS Plans Alcohol Test to Enter Prom
  • State Lawmakers Reach Tentative Agreement on Budget
  • King Co. Animal Control Captures 2 Pit Bulls After Attack

 

No Sign of Man Swept Away by Snoqualmie River

The King County sheriff's office says searchers have been unable to find a man missing in the fast-moving Snoqualmie River since he tried to rescue a dog. A sheriff's spokesman said Monday's search was suspended at 5 p.m.

KOMO-TV says Lindsay Grennan tells the station that she and her 28-year-old fiance, Johnny Sharrar, threw a stick in the water for their dog to chase on Sunday at Fall City. The dog got caught in the strong current and the couple jumped in to save the animal.

Grennan was rescued and the dog managed to get out safely.

"I love him more than anything in this world and I don't know what I'm going to do without him," she said. "I'm just praying that there is a miracle," said Grennan, who is pregnant with the couple's child and wants a sense of closure.

King County Sheriff's spokemsan Sgt. John Urquhart told the Seattle Times that at this time of year the river water is too cold and too fast for even the strongest swimmers to survive.

   

ACLU Eyeing Lake Washington High Alcohol Crackdown

The American Civil Liberties Union of Washington says a plan by Lake Washington High School to test every student at the senior prom June 4th sounds similar to "blanket searches" that courts have ruled against in the past.

But Kathryn Reith, Lake Washington School District spokeswoman told The Seattle Times there have been issues with students drinking at every dance this year:

The principal wanted to make sure that at the prom, there was more of a deterrent."

Reith says first-year principal Christina Thomas has told students that everyone at the prom - to be held at the Bellevue Hilton - will be tested for alcohol, though the exact method of testing hasn't been decided.

The district says it hasn't heard any complaints about the policy change, but the ACLU's Doug Honig told The Times it's his organization's view that public schools shouldn't be searching or testing their students without any indication that a student is doing something wrong:

"A blanket policy that treats every student as a suspect is not a good civics lesson in our society."

Statewide, the use of alcohol-detection equipment is "not an uncommon thing" at school functions, according to Linda Farmer, a spokeswoman for the Association of Washington School Principals.

 

Legislature to Release Budget Compromise Specifics Today

State legislative leaders plan to release specifics today on a tentative agreement reached Monday on how to close a $5-billion dollar budget shortfall over the next two years.

The Olympian reports the plan is expected to be approved before the special session is scheduled to end on Wednesday.

But there is one more major hurdle to clear - they're still negotiating a deal that would lower the state's debt limit.

Pit Bull Attacks in Kent, Kirkland

King County animal control officials say they have captured two dogs after biting attacks in Kent injured two men and killed a small dog.

County officials say a 19-year-old man was bitten on the leg yesterday afternoon and was treated at a hospital. The man's Pomeranian dog was attacked and killed by the dogs, both described as pit bulls.

The first person bitten was a 46-year-old man who suffered three bites. He also was treated at a hospital.

Last Saturday, Kirkland.Patch.com reported a man shot a pit bull after the dog first attacked his dog and then turned to attack him at Juanita Beach Park.