Seahawks' Lynch Tries To Open Up To Media, Gets Fed Up, Leaves

Jan 29, 2014

Marshawn Lynch, who has risked NFL fines for not talking to the media, made a brief appearance before cameras at Super Bowl 48 on Tuesday, taking questions for six minutes out of the Seahawks’ hour-long press availability.

Lynch was a little more generous Wednesday morning at the team hotel — that is, until he decided enough was enough, says KPLU sports commentator Art Thiel.

Lynch and his teammate Michael Robinson were sitting in chairs with their backs to the wall, answering questions from some 20 media members, Art says.

“He was being peppered with questions — all good questions, nothing in a way that was any kind of inquisition,” Art said.

Still, he was clearly uncomfortable, said Art: “He was obviously anxiety-ridden, nervous.”

Lynch finally decided he’d had enough.

“Got up, stood on the chairs and walked across the chairs that are up against the hotel hallway in order to escape the media,” said Art. “He was not outwardly upset; he had just had it … He managed to escape from the insanity. It was amusing; it wasn’t any episode or any incident. I feel sorry for the guy.”

‘He’s Trying’

Lynch is obviously making an effort, says Art.

“He’s trying. This is not his thing. I understand that. And I hope that the NFL recognizes that not everybody fits.”

Art says he’d be “very surprised” and “very disappointed” if the NFL fines him again.

“I think he’s fulfilling the minimum obligation [of the NFL]. They don’t say how long a player has to be here. They don’t say you have to say anything other than a few words,” he said.

Art says Seahawks coach Pete Carroll is right to give his players room to be themselves.

“I always thought that was a pretty enlightened view for an NFL head coach to understand, that there are rules that fit everybody, but there are other things about this job that don’t necessarily fit every player,” he said.

Listen for Art Thiel's live reports from Super Bowl XLVIII all next week at 8 a.m. during KPLU's Morning Edition. You can also find Art's work at Sportspress Northwest and Crosscut.com.