Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Pages

The Two-Way
1:22 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

Senate Democrats Say Caterpillar Avoided $2.4 Billion In Taxes

Caterpillar Inc Vice President for Finance Services Julie Lagacy is flanked by former Senior International Tax Manager Rodney Perkins (left) and Chief Tax Officer Robin Beran (right) as they are sworn in to testify on Tuesday.
Jonathan Ernst Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 1:31 pm

At a Senate committee hearing on Tuesday, senior officials of Peoria, Ill.-based Caterpillar Inc. defended the company against accusations that it had used an affiliate in Switzerland to avoided paying some $2.4 billion in taxes over a 12-year period.

"Americans pay the taxes they owe and not more. And, as an American company, we pay the taxes we owe, not more," Julie Lagacy, vice president of financial services at Caterpillar, told a Senate panel on Tuesday.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:25 am
Tue April 1, 2014

Global Airlines Call For Better Tracking Method After Flight 370

Chief Executive and Director General of the International Air Transport Association (IATA) Tony Tyler speaks during the IATA Ops Conference in Kuala Lumpur on Tuesday.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 1:02 pm

The head of an international airline group wants a new and better way to track passenger aircraft in flight after the disappearance of Flight MH370, saying: "We cannot let another aircraft simply vanish."

Read more
The Two-Way
10:02 am
Tue April 1, 2014

China's Military Latest Target In Anti-Corruption Drive

An unfinished residence which belongs to former PLA Gen. Gu Junshan is pictured in Puyang, Henan province, in January.
CHINA STRINGER NETWORK Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 9:06 am

China's anti-corruption campaign has expanded its reach to the country's military, with a former top general being charged and news that widespread wrongdoing had been uncovered at key units of the People's Liberation Army.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:24 am
Tue April 1, 2014

NATO Chief: No Sign Russian Troops Leaving Ukraine Border

NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen looks on at the start of a NATO foreign ministers meeting at the Alliance headquarters in Brussels on Tuesday.
Francois Lenoir Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 7:37 am

A day after Russian President Vladimir Putin reportedly promised that the Kremlin would withdraw some troops from near the border with Ukraine, the head of NATO says he's seen no movement as yet.

As we reported, German Chancellor Angela Merkel's office said on Monday that Putin had told her of the impending troop movement, which seemed designed to ratchet down tensions in the region after Russia's annexation of Crimea last month.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:08 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Congress Approves Ukraine Aid, Sanctions On Russia

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 12:03 pm

The House and Senate approved $1 billion in loan guarantees for Ukraine and sanctions on Moscow for Russia's annexation of Crimea.

Thursday's voice vote in the Senate and a 399-19 vote in the House for a different version of the bill came just hours after the International Monetary Fund pledged $18 billion in assistance for the former Soviet satellite.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:07 am
Thu March 27, 2014

After Blocking Twitter, Turkey Moves To Stop YouTube

A man tries to get connected to YouTube with his tablet at a cafe in Istanbul on Thursday.
Osman Orsal Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 10:50 am

Authorities in Turkey are reportedly going ahead with a ban on access to YouTube days after a similar move in the country to block Twitter.

The Turkish telecommunications authority TIB is quoted in Turkish state media as saying it has taken an "administrative measure" against YouTube.

The news follows earlier reports that a recording, allegedly of a meeting among top Turkish officials discussing military intervention in Syria, was posted on YouTube.

Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan on Thursday lashed out against the post:

Read more
The Two-Way
11:06 am
Thu March 27, 2014

James Schlesinger, Who Held Cabinet Posts And Led CIA For 17 Weeks, Dies

Former Secretary of Defense James Schlesinger speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York in December, 2006.
Brendan McDermid Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 10:42 am

James R. Schlesinger, who served three presidents from both parties in top Cabinet-level posts, has died at the age of 85. The Washington Post says he died Thursday at a hospital in Baltimore of complications from pneumonia.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:32 am
Thu March 27, 2014

German Man To Return Paintings From Cache Of Nazi-Looted Art

An obituary card with a portrait of German art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt (1895-1956), the father of Cornelius Gurlitt, in a folder at the municipal archive in Duesseldorf, Germany.
Rolf Vennenbernd EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 5:38 am

A German man who for years had hidden away art plundered by the Nazis during World War II has agreed to return the valuable works to their Jewish owners or their descendants, his lawyer said Wednesday.

Cornelius Gurlitt will start with returning Matisse's Seated Woman/Woman Sitting in Armchair to the descendants of Paul Rosenberg, who was a French art dealer whose descendants recognized the painting when details of the stash were made public in November.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:15 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Secret Service Agents Recalled From Overseas For Drinking

Members of the U.S. Secret Service's Counter Assault Team, known in the agency as CAT, are seen before boarding helicopters at a landing zone in Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, Netherlands, on Monday.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 10:52 am

Another embarrassing episode for the Secret Service: The latest involves reports of three agents being recalled from the Netherlands for a night of drinking ahead of President Obama's arrival there this week for a two-day summit.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:14 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Soyuz Misfire Delays Crew Trying To Reach Space Station

From left: U.S. astronaut Steve Swanson, and Russian cosmonauts Alexander Skvortsov and Oleg Artemyev prior to the launch of their Soyuz-FG rocket Wednesday at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.
Dmitry Lovetsky AP

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 10:18 am

A problem with a thruster aboard a Russian Soyuz capsule ferrying one American and two Russians to the International Space Station has caused an unexpected delay for the crew in reaching the orbiting platform.

As NPR's Geoff Brumfiel reports, it was supposed to be a six-hour journey from the launch at Kazakhstan's Baikonur Cosmodrome to the ISS, but one of the thrusters didn't fire at the right time.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:10 am
Tue March 25, 2014

Sailor Fatally Shot Aboard U.S. Navy Destroyer At Va. Base

A 2004 photo of the USS Mahan, a guided missile destroyer, as it moves up the Hudson River in New York.
Ed Bailey AP

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 9:23 am

A sailor was fatally shot aboard a U.S. Navy guided missile destroyer docked in the nation's largest naval base late Monday. Naval security forces then killed the civilian suspect.

A statement issued by the U.S. Naval Station Norfolk said the incident occurred about 11:20 p.m. aboard the USS Mahan (DDG 72).

"Naval Station Norfolk was briefly put on lockdown as a precautionary measure. The lockdown lasted approximately 45 minutes," the statement said. "No other injuries have been reported."

Read more
The Two-Way
6:00 am
Tue March 25, 2014

Bad Weather Suspends Search For Flight 370 In Indian Ocean

Family members of passengers aboard Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 tearfully shouted slogans during a protest Tuesday in front of the Malaysian Embassy in Beijing.
Kim Kyung-hoon Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 6:59 am

Angry relatives of passengers aboard the ill-fated Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 vented their anger at Malaysian officials Tuesday as rough weather in the southern Indian Ocean temporarily halted the search for wreckage from the airliner.

The BBC reports:

"In Beijing, relatives of passengers on board the plane released a statement accusing the Malaysian government of trying to 'delay, distort and hide the truth.'

Read more
The Two-Way
5:59 am
Tue March 25, 2014

White House To Propose Halting NSA Bulk Collection Of Phone Data

The sign outside the National Security Agency campus in Fort Meade, Md.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 12:42 pm

President Obama is preparing to announce a plan to scrap the government's systematic collection of bulk phone records as part of a far-reaching overhaul of the National Security Agency's controversial electronic surveillance activities.

The New York Times, quoting senior administration officials, reports:

Read more
The Two-Way
5:58 am
Tue March 25, 2014

Obama: Russia Making 'Series Of Calculations' After Crimea

President Obama, accompanied by Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, speaks during their joint news conference at the conclusion of the Nuclear Security Summit in The Hague on Tuesday.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 11:27 am

(This post was updated at 11:30 a.m. ET.)

President Obama on Tuesday said that he believed that Russia was "still making a series of calculations" regarding any further moves after its annexation of Crimea, but that there was no expectation of dislodging it by force from the Black Sea peninsula.

"What we can bring to bear are the legal arguments, the diplomatic arguments," he said at a joint news conference with Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte following a nuclear security summit in The Hague.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:06 am
Mon March 24, 2014

Japan To Turn Over Nuclear Stockpile To U.S. For Safe Keeping

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe leaves Tokyo's Haneda airport Sunday en route to a two-day nuclear security summit in The Hague, Netherlands.
Kyodo/Landov

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 8:43 am

Japan has agreed to hand over to the U.S. a decades-old stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium that is said to be large enough to build dozens of nuclear weapons.

The 700-pound cache, which had been maintained by Japan for research purposes, would be turned over to the U.S. for safe keeping, according to an agreement announced Monday at the G7 nuclear security summit in The Hague, Netherlands. It's part of an Obama administration push to prevent the nuclear material from being stolen by potential terrorists.

Read more

Pages