Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Thailand's crown prince and the woman who would have been on the throne next to him are now officially divorced, the palace announced today in a move that many observers see as a precursor to a possible succession struggle.

It's been a violent 24 hours in Afghanistan:

-- 12 workers clearing mines on Saturday were attacked by Taliban militants and another dozen were wounded, a police spokesman said.

Updated at 5:00 p.m. ET

A shooter wounded two boys and a girl outside a high school in Portland, Ore., in what police said may be a gang-related assault.

The incident occurred near Rosemary Anderson High School. The Oregonian reports that a 17-year-old was shot in the back and another person, a female, was shot in the chest. The newspaper did not give specifics on the third victim.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says it has found the remains of a 19th century passenger steamer that sank near the present-day Golden Gate Bridge at the entrance to San Francisco Bay, killing 128 people, mostly immigrants from China and Japan.

Inbound from Hong Kong, the City of Rio de Janeiro, which came to be known as the "Titanic of the Golden Gate," went down in dense fog after hitting submerged rocks early on the morning of Feb. 22, 1901.

The Great Recession has widened the wealth gap among white, black and Hispanic Americans, with median net worth in white households increasing to 13 times that for African-Americans, a new Pew Research Center study shows.

The study also shows that from 2007 to 2013, the wealth of white households has grown to 10 times that of Hispanic households.

An orphaned southern sea otter pup that was rescued from the California coast and ended up at Chicago's Shedd Aquarium might well be over the moon about her new name: Luna.

The otter had been designated "Pup 681" by the aquarium, which held a contest to name her. More than 10,000 votes were cast, and the name Luna beat out Cali, Ellie, Poppy and Ana.

U.N. talks on global warming are wrapping up in Peru, but a divide between rich and poor countries and how to divvy up targets to reduce greenhouse gases is a key sticking point that has remained unresolved.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry has acknowledged that the issue is "hard fought and ... complex," but he says it is crucial that the targets be agreed on before next year's summit in Paris. The talks in Peru end today.

Several thousand hotel guests, many of them conventiongoers dressed as animal characters, were forced to evacuate a suburban Chicago hotel early this morning after a chlorine gas leak was detected. Nineteen people who complained of dizziness and nausea were treated and released from the hospital, according to The Associated Press.

The Chicago Tribune reports:

Syrian state media say Israeli planes hit government-controlled zones in and around Damascus in what independent observers have said was an apparent effort to target Hezbollah arms shipments.

"The Israeli enemy committed aggression against Syria by targeting two safe areas in Damascus province, in all of Dimas and near the Damascus International Airport," state television said, adding that there were no casualties, according to Reuters.

Jason Rezaian, The Washington Post's bureau chief in Tehran who has been held by the Iranian government for more than four months, was formally charged over the weekend, but the specifics are not yet known, his newspaper reports.

Update at 12:05 p.m. ET

More details are trickling in out about this weekend's failed attempt to rescue American photojournalist Luke Somers from his al-Qaida captors in Yemen.

Somers, 33, was held along with a South African teacher, Pierre Korkie; both were killed by their kidnappers when U.S. Navy SEALs were detected before they were able to snatch the captives.

Updated at 2:10 p.m. ET

Six men long detained at Guantanamo Bay – four Syrians, one Tunisian and one Palestinian – were transferred this morning to Uruguay in a deal forged by the White House to reduce the inmate population at the controversial prison, which President Obama has promised to close.

Police in Berkeley, Calif., used smoke, flares and rubber bullets against demonstrators who turned unruly overnight amid rallies to protest the police killings of unarmed black men in Missouri and New York.

The Justice Department is preparing to release new guidelines for some federal agents that would prohibit them from using such factors as religion or sexual orientation to profile individuals, but the new policy would not apply at airports or border crossings.

NPR's Carrie Johnson says the DOJ has been considering the change, expected out any day, for the past five years.

"They will add some new categories that are prohibited, like sexual orientation and religion," Carrie tells Weekend All Things Considered.

Los Angeles police say they will investigate a woman's claims that in the mid-1970s at the age of 15, she was molested by comedian Bill Cosby.

The Associated Press says: "The investigation was opened Friday after Judy Huth, who is suing Cosby for sexual battery, met with detectives for 90 minutes, Officer Jane Kim said."

Further, the AP says: "Huth's civil suit claims Cosby forced her to perform a sex act on him in a bedroom of the Playboy Mansion around 1974 when she was underage."

Pages