Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Pages

The Two-Way
10:40 am
Thu July 17, 2014

Australia Repeals An Unpopular Tax On Carbon Emissions

An oil refinery is pictured in the southern Sydney suburb of Kurnell earlier this week. Australia's Senate voted on Thursday to scrap the country's carbon tax and plans for emissions trading — a major victory for conservative Prime Minister Tony Abbott.
Jason Reed Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 7:47 am

Australia became the first country in the world to repeal a carbon tax on the nation's worst greenhouse gas polluters, as Prime Minister Tony Abbott made good on a campaign promise to get rid of the unpopular law.

The Senate voted 39 to 32 to eliminate the tax enacted by the previous center-left government two years ago. The law imposed the equivalent of a $22.60 tax per metric ton of carbon dioxide emissions on about 350 of the nation's worst polluters.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:40 am
Thu July 17, 2014

CEO Of Ignition Switch Maker Says No Responsibility For GM Deaths

Executive vice president and general counsel at General Motors Co. Michael Millikin (from left), GM CEO Mary Barra, CEO and president of Delphi Automotive PLC Rodney O'Neal and chairman of the firm at Jenner & Block Anton Valukas testify before a Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee hearing.
Jim Lo Scalzo EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 11:52 am

The CEO of the manufacturer of the ignition switches that ended up in recalled General Motors cars said his company bears no responsibility for deaths resulting from the part, which was redesigned according to GM specifications.

"We had a product that we worked with General Motors to develop," Delphi Automotive's Rodney O'Neal told a Senate subcommittee looking into the ignition switch failure that caused at least 13 deaths among drivers and passengers in GM cars.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:44 am
Thu July 10, 2014

Singapore Anti-Gambling Council Loses Big On World Cup Ad

Gambling-control ad put out by Singapore.
National Council on Problem Gambling (NCPG) - Singapore

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 12:23 pm

We bet that the folks in Singapore who produced this anti-gambling TV ad wish they could have a do-over:

The 30-second public service announcement features a group of boys talking about the World Cup. They each support a different team. Then the mood quickly turns as one boy says he hopes Germany wins because, "My dad bet all my savings on them."

Read more
The Two-Way
9:00 am
Thu July 10, 2014

4 Children, 2 Adults Killed In Apparent Domestic Dispute In Texas

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 8:24 am

This post was updated at 11:10 a.m. ET.

A man suspected in the shooting deaths of four children and two adults surrendered to police in a Houston suburb after a three-hour standoff Wednesday night.

The alleged gunman has been identified as Ronald Lee Haskell, 33, who has been charged with multiple counts of capital murder.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:14 am
Sat July 5, 2014

WATCH: Hurricane Arthur From 30 Miles Out At Sea

Screen grab of video showing Hurricane Arthur passing by Frying Pan Tower, a bed and breakfast located 30 miles off the North Carolina coast.
YouTube

Originally published on Sat July 5, 2014 12:08 pm

Although Hurricane Arthur appears to have spared the U.S. East Coast any major damage, 100 mph winds are nothing to take lightly, especially 30 miles out to sea along the infamous Frying Pan Shoals south of Cape Hatteras.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:58 am
Thu July 3, 2014

Woman Charged In Denver With Seeking To Aid Islamic Extremists

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 11:52 am

A 19-year-old Denver-area woman has been charged with conspiring to help a foreign terrorist organization after she was arrested in April boarding a flight that would ultimately land her in Syria, where she hoped to wage jihad, according to newly unsealed court documents.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:39 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

GM Stops Selling Late-Model Chevy Cruzes; Recall Expected

A Chevrolet Cruze is displayed at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, in January.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 5:13 am

General Motors has issued an order to stop selling 2013 and 2014 model years of the Chevrolet Cruze compact car because of air bags that might not inflate properly. The automaker has identified 33,000 vehicles, mostly in the U.S. and Canada, with the potential problem and is expected to recall those already sold.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:54 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Pot Use On The Rise In U.S., Report Says

A U.N. report says the use and potency of cannabis is on the rise in the U.S.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 2:34 pm

Marijuana use in the United States has gone up as the public perception of the drug's risk has gone down, according to a new United Nations report. The potency of the drug has also increased,

Read more
The Two-Way
1:53 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Obama Asks For $500 Million To Train, Equip Syrian Rebels

Rebel fighters drink tea on the front line of Ramouseh, near the Aleppo Artillery School. President Obama has requested $500 million to arm and train "moderate" Syrian rebel groups.
Hosam Katan Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 2:21 pm

President Obama has asked Congress for $500 million to train and equip moderate Syrian rebels who are seeking the ouster of Bashar Assad.

If Congress approves the plan, it would supplement a covert training and assistance program already being run by U.S. intelligence agencies, The Associated Press says.

The White House says in a statement that the rebels would be vetted before providing assistance, to ensure that U.S. equipment doesn't fall into the wrong hands.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:06 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

Beijing Blasts U.S. Plan To Name Road By Embassy After Dissident

An undated photo provided by Voice of America shows Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo, who won the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize. He was jailed in 2008 for promoting human rights. An amendment in Congress proposes renaming the street in front of the Chinese Embassy in Washington, D.C., in his honor.
AP

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 5:24 pm

Beijing is fuming over a provision slipped into a State Department budget to change the name of the street fronting the Chinese Embassy in Washington to "Liu Xiaobo Plaza," in honor of the jailed dissident and Nobel Peace Prize laureate.

The amendment, proposed by Virginia Republican Rep. Frank Wolf, would change the name of the street currently known as International Place. Wolf says it would send "a clear and powerful message that the United States remains vigilant and resolute in its commitment to safeguard human rights around the globe."

Read more
The Two-Way
11:42 am
Wed June 25, 2014

Federal Judges Reverse Gay-Marriage Bans In Utah, Indiana

Utah Gov. Gary Herbert addresses a crowd during a rally at the Western Republican Leadership Conference in Sandy, Utah, in April. Herbert reiterated his support of the state's same-sex marriage ban, which was struck down Wednesday by a federal panel.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 1:11 pm

This post updated at 4:00 p.m. ET.

Utah and Indiana are the latest states to see their bans on same-sex marriage struck down by a federal court, following rulings in both states Wednesday that found the prohibition unconstitutional.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:30 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Report Points To 'Dangerous Militarization' Of U.S. Law Enforcement

During a drill, SWAT team members prepare to secure a ship in Bainbridge Island, Wash.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 5:09 pm

U.S. law enforcement at all levels has undergone a dangerous militarization in recent years, with heavily armed SWAT teams being deployed to serve warrants and for drug searches, but rarely for the hostage situations they were designed for, the American Civil Liberties Union says in a new report.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:27 am
Tue June 24, 2014

NTSB: Too Much Technology, Too Little Training Caused Asiana Crash

Asiana Flight 214 crashed at San Francisco International Airport in July 2013. The NTSB concluded Tuesday that an over-reliance on automated systems contributed to the crash.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 12:32 pm

Pilot misjudgment and an over-reliance on automated systems were the main causes of last year's crash of Asiana Flight 214 in San Francisco that killed three people, the National Transportation Safety Board concluded Tuesday.

The Boeing 777 with 307 people aboard came in too low and too slow in its landing approach, the NTSB said. It hit a seawall, ripping off the tail and sending the plane's fuselage skidding down the tarmac.

The board said there was confusion over whether the plane was maintaining adequate speed for landing.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:26 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Mormon Church Excommunicates Advocate For Female Priests

Kate Kelly, a Mormon and founder of Ordain Women, wipes away a tear during a vigil on Sunday in Salt Lake City. Church leaders have ruled to excommunicate her for advocating in favor of female priests.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 2:48 pm

An all-male panel of Mormon leaders has found a prominent member of the group Ordain Women guilty of apostasy and ordered that she be excommunicated from the church.

On its website, Ordain Women quoted from an email that Kate Kelly received informing her of the decision by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints:

Read more
The Two-Way
12:31 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Beijing: Hong Kong Democracy Referendum 'An Illegal Farce'

People vote Sunday at a polling station for an unofficial referendum on democratic reform in Hong Kong. Beijing has denounced the vote as illegal.
Kin Cheung AP

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 12:26 pm

China state media have denounced an unofficial democracy referendum being held in Hong Kong that has drawn more than 700,000 voters so far, saying it is "tinged with mincing ludicrousness."

Read more

Pages