Robin Lloyd

Midday Jazz Host

Robin Lloyd was born and raised in the Detroit area. She performed radio plays in junior high and high school, took various radio apprenticeships in high school and college, and has held a number of different positions at community and public radio stations in Michigan and Western Washington, including Jazz and Blues Host, Producer, Production Manager, Station Operations Manager and Program Director. Robin is married to drummer Michael Slivka; together they manage a household full of dogs, cats and percussion.

Her most memorable KPLU moment: dancing with the Wild Magnolias Mardi Gras Indians on stage at Jazz Alley on my birthday.

Ways to Connect

Augusta Sagnelli

Clarinetist Anat Cohen's transcendent appearances with the Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra last February are still resonating.

"I loved the trip to Seattle, loved meeting all the people there, the SRJO and other musicians. It was great time, and a wonderful hang," she said. "Everybody there is so nice.”

Her latest CD, "Luminosa" features a number of beautiful Brazilian melodies.  Anat first encountered the varied styles of Brazilian music when she was a student at the Berklee College of Music in Boston.

Singer Ed Reed and saxophonist Anton Schwartz met almost 10 years ago in the San Francisco Bay Area.  Ed was 78 years old at the time, and was just beginning to get recognized as a jazz singer.

Partly due to his love of jazz, Ed has survived drug addiction and multiple prison terms.  Four CDs later, he’s been on the Downbeat Critic’s Poll list of “Rising Stars” for six years, topping that list in 2014. 

el diario archive

Born and raised in Cadiz, Spanish pianist Chano Domínguez recently moved his family to Seattle, adding a flamenco touch to our outstanding musical scene. 

"I have played in so many places around the world and in the USA, and for me, Seattle is one of the most wonderful cities.  We are very happy to be here," he says.

"I grew up in a poor family in the south of Spain, in Andalusia.  It was hard, because I didn't have an instrument, and I cried every year for a flamenco guitar. 

Dorothy Darr

Saxophonist Charles Lloyd is a mystic, a nature lover and a sound-seeker.  He seems to inhabit an enchanted space, and considers himself in service to the music, which he must share. 

"It changes the molecules," he explains. "People seem to brighten up, and I brighten up, and we all get blessed." 

He also has an uncanny ability to look backward and forward at the same time, which makes for some interesting conversations.


Edmar Castañeda plays the arpa llanera, a traditional folkloric instrument from Columbia and Venezuela. Classical harps have 46 or 47 strings, but the smaller llanera has only 32. That makes it lighter, swifter and somehow more least it sounds like it in the hands of this master from Bogotá.

Drummer Antonio Sanchez has been getting a lot of press lately, including a cover story in the July issue of Downbeat magazine.  His award-winning, propulsive drum-solo score for the film “Birdman, Or The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance” and the controversy of it being disqualified from the Oscar Awards had the unexpected virtue of introducing Antonio to audiences beyond jazz enthusiasts.

Here's our periodic listing of Latin Jazz, Brazilian and Cuban music coming to Seattle, get out and enjoy!

Daniel Sheehan /

On April first, the Jazz Journalists Association announced its list of 2015 Jazz Heroes: advocates, altruists, activists, aiders and abettors of jazz who have had significant impact in their local communities.

The 'Jazz Hero' awards, made annually on the basis of nominations from community members, are presented in conjunction with the JJA's annual Jazz Awards honoring significant achievements in jazz music and journalism and with the month-long celebration of JazzApril.

Randy Cole

Initiated last year by Kent Devereaux, the former Music Department Chair of Cornish College of the Arts, the Seattle Jazz Experience is a youth jazz festival that presents two full days of workshops and performances this Friday and Saturday at the Cornish Playhouse at Seattle Center.  It's  collaboration between Cornish, Earshot Jazz, Seattle JazzEd and Seattle Center.

Dr. David Deacon-Joyner, Director of Jazz Studies at Pacific Lutheran University is on the steering committee for the festival.

Remembering Clark Terry

Feb 21, 2015

One of the best things about my work is that I get to meet, talk with and even hang out with some of the greatest musicians of all time. I've found that the artists who leave indelible impressions are the ones for whom the playing of music is a practice of spirituality.

I've been fortunate enough to have made that spiritual connection with some of the giants who took the time to share a bit of their world with me and who live in my heart. And then there's Clark Terry.

Melissa Aldana and Crash Trio will be making their first appearance in Seattle tonight at Jazz Alley.

The 26-year-old Chilean saxophonist was the first female and the first South American to win the prestigious Thelonious Monk International Saxophone Competition in 2013.

Suzette Niess /

“The Jazz Education Network is dedicated to building the jazz arts community by advancing education, promoting performance, and developing new audiences.”

It’s a clear and concise mission statement, and the power behind it is a group of incredibly dedicated and hard-working people. My discussions with JEN founders and board members at the 6th annual conference in San Diego earlier this month had this theme: There’s still so much to be done, and we’re totally up for it.

Saxophonist Miguel Zenón has taken on some interesting projects in his career. He's a founding member of the SF Jazz Collective, a Kennedy Center jazz ambassador and the recipient of both a Guggenheim and a MacArthur fellowship.

He's also the founder of Caravana Cultural, a program designed to bring free-of-charge jazz concerts and educational presentations to rural areas of Puerto Rico. It involves both the best of New York's jazz players and young Puerto Rican musicians. 

Zenón's latest recording "Identities Are Changeable" (11/4/2014 Miel Music) is inspired by the idea of national identity as viewed or experienced by the Puerto Rican community in the United States, specifically in New York City.

Eddy Westveer

"The Sound of Redemption:  The Frank Morgan Story" will be showing on Saturday, Oct. 25 at NW Film Forum in Seattle as part of the Earshot Jazz Film Festival. Frank Morgan was a prodigy, a young West Coast saxophonist who was hailed as "the next Charlie Parker." Morgan's life and career were stalled for 30 years because of heroin use, felonies and prison sentences.

"The Sound of Redemption:  The Frank Morgan Story" will be showing on Saturday, October 25 at NW Film Forum in Seattle as part of the Earshot Jazz Film Festival. Frank Morgan was a talented West Coast saxophonist whose life and career were stalled for 30 years because of heroin use and prison sentences.

Singer Ed Reed is one of many subjects interviewed in the film. He was a friend of Morgan's, and he has a similar story.

B. Leyva

Guitarist Pablo Menéndez takes fusion to the next level.  His band Mezcla (meaning "mixture") blends jazz, blues, rock and several styles of Cuban and African music into one raucous, joyous expression of life.

Joybox Express

Boogie-woogie and blues pianist Mark Braun (a.k.a. Mr. B) has fond memories of touring in the Pacific Northwest. KPLU has played his recordings for more than 20 years. I've followed Mr. B for some time, because there's not much I like better than his style of piano playing, the music that came up from New Orleans and the Mississippi Delta.

What I didn't know about him until recently is that he's also a dedicated amateur athlete, an avid bicyclist and an advocate for getting kids active in the arts and athletics.

Michael Hoefner

I had a delightful telephone chat last week with Juan de Marcos, leader of the Afro Cuban All Stars.

Known as the "Quincy Jones of Cuba," Juan de Marcos comes from a family of musicians.  His father was a well-known singer with famed tres player and bandleader Arsenio Rodriguez, and his uncle, Ruben Gonzalez, was one of Cuba's most beloved pianists.  Juan grew up with some of the finest Cuban musicians visiting and playing music in his home.

I got my start in public/community radio at WFBE in Flint, Michigan in the late 1970s. I talked my way into being the self-appointed assistant, apprentice and substitute for a Thursday night program called John's Jazz.

The show was hosted by John R. Davis, journalist and unmatched jazz enthusiast. He very kindly let me tag along and learn things about music and radio.

John’s Jazz theme song was "On The Sunny Side Of The Street" featuring Johnny Hodges on sax.

The long-awaited film about legendary jazz trumpeter Clark Terry "Keep On Keepin' On"  won an audience choice award at the Tribeca Film Festival in April, and will be shown next week in the Seattle International Film Festival.  The documentary follows the relationship of Terry with one of his many students, pianist Justin Kauflin.

Steve Korn

The Jazz Journalists Association announced on April 1 (no joke) its list of 24 Jazz Heroes for 2014. 

Jim Wilke, host and producer of KPLU's "Jazz Northwest" and PRI's "Jazz After Hours" is Seattle's Jazz Hero. 

Involved in the local music and radio scene since the early 1960s, Jim was inducted into the Seattle Jazz Hall of Fame in 1993, and won the prestigious Willis Conover–Marian McPartland Award for Broadcasting last year.

The Jazz Education Network (JEN) created a new award called  "Keepers of the Flame:  LeJENds of Latin Jazz." Presented at the annual JEN Conference in January, the award's first recipient was NEA Jazz Master Candido Camero.

Steve Korn

Pianist, composer, arranger, humorist and world traveler Bill Anschell brings his "Peru Trio" to the Art of Jazz series at the Seattle Art Museum tonight at 5:30.  It's part of the Earshot Jazz Festival.


 Latin jazz flutist Dave Valentin suffered a stroke in March 2012, and has been unable to work since then.  A benefit concert will take place tonight, Nov. 7, at the Tarrytown Music Hall in Tarrytown, N.Y.  The show will help raise funds to pay his medical expenses and basic living needs.

David Sproule

Cuban-born pianist, composer and bandleader Omar Sosa received a lifetime achievement award from the Smithsonian Associates in Washington, DC in 2003 for his contribution to the development of Latin jazz in the United States.  His latest CD Eggun (spirit guides) grew from a commission by the Barcelona Jazz Festival in 2009.  The idea was to pay tribute to Miles Davis’ seminal album, Kind of Blue, on its 50th anniversary.

bunky's pickle

Female instrumentalists of all types have been part of jazz since its inception, but for the most part, they have been erased from the history of the music. The film "Lady Be Good: Instrumental Women in Jazz" intends to put the spotlight on the many talented women who have nearly been forgotten.

Jamie Tanaka,

The SFJAZZ Collective is an all-star jazz ensemble comprising eight of the finest performer/composers at work in jazz today.  Launched in 2004,  the ensemble annually performs a new list of compositions by a modern jazz master and new pieces by the Collective members.

The Cuban-born drummer/percussionist, bandleader and composer Dafnis Prieto appears at the Earshot Jazz Festival next Thursday, October 17 at the Poncho Concert Hall at Cornish College for the Arts, with his Si o Si Quartet:  Peter Apfelbaum (saxophone/melodica/caxixi), Robert Rodriguez (piano) and Johannes Weidenmueller (bass).


Guitarist Pat Martino was a jazz and soul-jazz star since the mid-1960s, recording for the Prestige, Muse, Warner Bros. and Blue Note labels.  In 1980, after operations for a brain aneurysm, he could remember nothing.

Oscar Castro Neves  1940-2013

A founding figure in the development of Bossa Nova, Brazilian guitarist, composer and arranger Oscar Castro Neves died on September 27.