Robert Krulwich

Robert Krulwich works on radio, podcasts, video, the blogosphere. He has been called "the most inventive network reporter in television" by TV Guide.

Krulwich is a Science Correspondent for NPR. His NPR blog, "Krulwich Wonders" features drawings, cartoons and videos that illustrate hard-to-see concepts in science.

He is the co-host of Radiolab, a nationally distributed radio/podcast series that explores new developments in science for people who are curious but not usually drawn to science shows. "There's nothing like it on the radio," says Ira Glass of This American Life, "It's a act of crazy genius." Radiolab won a Peabody Award in 2011.

His specialty is explaining complex subjects, science, technology, economics, in a style that is clear, compelling and entertaining. On television he has explored the structure of DNA using a banana; on radio he created an Italian opera, "Ratto Interesso" to explain how the Federal Reserve regulates interest rates; he has pioneered the use of new animation on ABC's Nightline and World News Tonight.

For 22 years, Krulwich was a science, economics, general assignment and foreign correspondent at ABC and CBS News.

He won Emmy awards for a cultural history of the Barbie doll, for a Frontline investigation of computers and privacy, a George Polk and Emmy for a look at the Savings & Loan bailout online advertising and the 2010 Essay Prize from the Iowa Writers' Workshop.

Krulwich earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in history from Oberlin College and a law degree from Columbia University.

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NPR Science
1:12 pm
Tue September 11, 2012

The 'miracle' of the levitating slinky (cooler than it seems)

Veritasium/YouTube

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 5:43 am

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NPR science
10:27 am
Fri September 7, 2012

Volcano shoots geyser of water up into space

Michael Benson

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 8:53 am

What we have here is a moon — a small one (slightly wider than the state of Arizona) — circling Saturn.

If you look closely, you will see a small splay of light at its top, looking like a circular fountain.

That's because it is a fountain — of sorts. A bunch of volcano-like jets are sending fantastically high geysers of water vapor up into the sky, so high that you can see them in this remarkable print by Michael Benson, back lit by light bouncing off of Saturn.

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2012 Olympics
9:02 am
Mon July 30, 2012

Embarrassed By Your Olympic Javelin: Did Cavemen Do It Better?

Ian Walton Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 10:23 am

Stronger, faster, fiercer, finer. That's what the Olympics promise us — higher performance, new world records. But not if you throw things.

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NPR diversions
7:50 am
Tue July 17, 2012

Five Men Agree To Stand Directly Under An Exploding Nuclear Bomb

Atom Central/YouTube

Originally published on Wed July 18, 2012 11:23 am

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NPR Diversions
2:31 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Woman On Street Attacked By Giant Snail, It Seems

Julian Beever

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 2:09 pm

Here's what got Nagai Hideyuki excited. Hideyuki lives in Tokyo. He's now 21. This photo was taken on the other side of the world, somewhere in Europe. What you see here is a street and a plain stone bench, both partially covered by a chalk drawing. The drawing disappears in places and at one point seems to bump into a metal pole.

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NPR tech news
9:10 am
Sat June 30, 2012

Robot with super powers wins at 'rock, paper scissors' every time

YouTube

Originally published on Sat June 30, 2012 4:06 am

First chess, now this:

Here's a robot from Ishikawa Oku's physics lab at the University of Tokyo that plays rock, paper, scissor and always beats the human, every single time. Because the team that built it gave it a superpower.

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NPR diversions
9:06 am
Sat April 14, 2012

The strange persistence of shoes at sea

Tennis shoes lay on the beach on Terschelling island, Netherlands, Feb. 10, 2006. They were from a shipping container that fell off a ship during a storm.
Marleen Swart AP

Originally published on Sat April 14, 2012 5:23 am

A ship sinks. A hundred years pass. What remains? Look down, down to your feet while I tell you this tale.

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NPR diversions
1:53 pm
Tue April 10, 2012

Wind at sea is strangely Van Goghish, says NASA

YouTube

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 8:55 am

Yesterday, we took a look at invisible winds suddenly made visible, streaming across the Earth. This being the blustery season, I've got more wind today, this time streaming across the sea, but looking uncannily like a van Gogh sky.

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