Martha Kang

Online Managing Editor

Martha oversees KPLU's digital editorial content on KPLU.org, Quirksee.org and various social media platforms.

Prior to joining KPLU in March 2013, Martha spent six years on the digital team of KOMO News, reporting and producing stories for the station's website. Starting in July 2011, she also led the station's social media efforts, increasing the news outlet's digital reach exponentially and establishing KOMO as a regional powerhouse. 

Martha has worked as a news writer at Northwest Cable News, and as a freelancer at WLS-TV in Chicago.  She attended the University of Missouri School of Journalism while working as a TV news producer and reporter at KOMU-TV in Columbia, Missouri. In the spring of 2013, she was awarded the Kiplinger Fellowship by Ohio State University's Kiplinger Program in Public Affairs Journalism. 

Ways To Connect

A bomb threat on Wednesday prompted the evacuation of Marysville Pilchuck High School, where a shooting claimed five lives last October. 

Courtesy of Krystle Wright

Ben Plotkin-Swing stood balancing on a line, just an inch wide, stretched between two towering spires in the North Cascades.

Below much of the line, only thin air stretched for thousands of feet down to the jagged floor of the mountain.

Plotkin-Swing's safety harness was attached to the line. And he’d never been afraid of heights. Still, something happens when you’re standing on a thin strip of polyester webbing far above the ground.

Read the full story on our companion site, Quirksee.org >>>

Courtesy of Rika Manabe

When Junko Mine gets ready to bake, she starts with a big glass jar.

She fills it with water, then adds something for flavor: maybe a few raspberries, some Douglas fir needles or a whole apple, skin and all.

She seals the jar tightly, then waits. For five to seven days.

Photo courtesy of Ian Tuttle.

Photographer Ian Tuttle was driving when he saw three backpackers resting under a tree near the Pacific Crest Trail in California.

He pulled over. Did they need water or a ride somewhere? Maybe a beer? Just the beer, the hikers told him. And so Tuttle ended up spending the next hour with them, talking over beers and taking their photos.

Justin Steyer / KPLU

It used to be that pigs would roam the fields, nose to the ground, sniffing for the musk of a buried truffle. Once hot on the trail, the hog would rout down and down for the crest of the hidden truffle.

Courtesy of Rex Hohlbein

Seattle architect Rex Hohlbein had been designing luxury homes for decades when his focus suddenly turned to the homeless.

Hohlbein says it all started during his morning bike ride to the office. He met a man named Chiaka. This encounter would change his life. 

Take 87 seconds to hear Hohlbein tell his story:

AP Photo

Think we don’t have an accent here in the Pacific Northwest? Think again.

Scientists say we do, in fact, have an accent, though our native ears may not always pick up on it. The longer we’ve lived here, the harder it is for us to hear our own distinct subtleties, according to experts.

So let’s put our ears to the test. We asked three people to say the same sentence: “Please put the fish you caught at dawn in the bag, not in the bowl.” Click on the three audio clips below to hear them, then pick out the voice you think belongs to a native Northwesterner. 

Courtesy of Clayton Kauzlaric

If Seattle's streets could talk, they’re likely to tell you the stories depicted in Clayton Kauzlaric’s photos.

Kauzlaric uses Photoshop to juxtapose archival photos with modern-day images of the same location.

Take, for instance, the stretch of Alaskan Way that houses the ferry terminal on Seattle’s waterfront. These days, it’s an unremarkable place where a McDonald’s sign greets passersby. But it has quite a history — it’s also the same place Japanese residents were made to board trains headed to internment camps back in 1942.

Read the full story on our companion site, Quirksee.org >>>

(Dorothea Lange/Farm Security Administration)

As America struggled in the throes of the Great Depression, a team of photographers was dispatched across the country to capture moments of their lives.

The project was an attempt to win political favor for government programs, including Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Resettlement Administration in 1935. The initiative aimed to aid the poorest one-third of displaced farmers through resettlement and low-interest loans.

Katrina Spade / Urban Death Project

What if after you die, your remains were turned into compost?

That’s the idea behind the Urban Death Project, which aims to introduce a new burial option in urban areas.

Martha Kang / KPLU

It’s the rare person who sees a hole in the ground and feels compelled to stick his head in it.

But cavers are “innately curious,” says veteran caver Tom Evans, who himself will not only peer in, but try to squeeze his whole body through a just-big-enough opening into Earth's damp, dark underbelly.

Elaine Thompson / AP Photo

Boeing failed to negotiate in good faith when it refused to provide evidence to substantiate its claim that workers in the Puget Sound area cost more than workers elsewhere, a National Labor Relations Board judge ruled Friday.

The ruling was in response to an unfair labor practice charge filed by the Society of Professional Engineering Employees in Aerospace, or SPEEA.

Courtesy of Mark McCcracken.

Editor’s note: This piece is an update to our previous story on Bruce Stobie, which ran in May. 

When Bruce Stobie arrived at Denali last month, he could feel the presence of the mountain, even if he couldn’t see it.

“I felt like a guest — not a welcome guest,” said the blind climber from Des Moines, Washington. “All there was: rock, ice and snow. And cold and warm temperatures. And that’s it. There’s nothing else.”

Provided by Seattle Public Schools.

The Seattle School Board has named former Marysville School District Superintendent Larry Nyland as its interim superintendent.

The board made the announcement following a special meeting Friday.

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

The Seattle City Council has confirmed Kathleen O’Toole as the first female chief of the Seattle Police Department.

With an 8-to-1 vote Monday, the council approved Seattle Mayor Ed Murray’s nomination. Council member Kshama Sawant cast the lone dissent vote.

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