KPLU

News articles from KPLU

This March was Portland's wettest month ever, with a record-breaking 7.73 inches of rain. And, records fell throughout most of Washington last month, as well, reports KPLU weather expert Cliff Mass.

As another successful pledge drive ends this season we hope you will continue to enjoy the commercial-free programming on KPLU, especially knowing you did your part to make it happen.

If you missed the pledge drive and would like to support KPLU, you can still be counted through April 9th!

We would also like to thank the various businesses who supported our volunteers and staff during the Spring Pledge Drive

By Lisa Stiffler, Humanosphere correspondent

Can Dean Chahim save the world?

Not alone, he can’t. But if he can inspire and educate enough people in “critical consciousness” – an awareness of the policies and practices that create injustices and an understanding of how we can change them for the better – that might just do it.

Read more on Humanosphere.

KPLU extends a special thank you to the following companies who were generous enough to donate their products for our volunteers during the 2012 Spring Pledge Drive.

 

Pepsi 

Choice Organic Teas

Tim’s Cascade Chips

Crystal Springs Water

Overlake School

By Claudia Rowe, Humanosphere correspondent

In a lesson showing just how far one unlikely idea can travel, 18 upper affluent kids from suburban Seattle are this weekend en route to Cambodia, where they will teach science, art and English to some of the poorest children on Earth.

Foreign aid is a messy business, often stymied by inefficiency and corruption. But students from the Overlake School in Redmond wave off such concerns – not to mention parental worries about residual landmines and mandatory inoculations.

They believe their two-week trip to the village of Pailin will benefit them as much as their young pupils.

Read more on Humanosphere.

By Todd Bishop at Geekwire

Google patented system would use noise at games and other settings to determine location and target ads.

“Changemakers” is a new series on Humanosphere exploring how young people, connected and globally aware, are working to change the world.

By Lisa Stiffler, special correspondent

Katie Leach-Kemon arrived in Niger as a newly minted college grad, eager to help in her role as a community health agent with the Peace Corps. She teamed up with health workers who were identifying acutely malnourished children, and then assisting their mothers to better feed their kids. It was culturally sensitive stuff.

“I was straight out of college,” she said, “and I had a lot to learn.”

Read more on Humanosphere.

Seattle Municipal Archives

By Knute Berger of Crosscut

As we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Seattle World's Fair, it's time to remember some of the crimes and blunders that went along with it. Some even launched new industries.

By Lisa Stiffler, special correspondent

Global health and development is by definition bound to be overpowering. So Noah Derman has a strategy for not feeling crushed by the enormous scope of the field’s challenges – he mentally breaks them into smaller chunks.

“If you look at smaller battles that you win,” said Derman, “you won’t get so overwhelmed.”

For Derman, development director for Development in Gardening, or DIG, those battles are won one vegetable patch at a time.

Read more on Humanosphere.

Michael Goodin / Flickr

By John Cook of Geekwire

A new online service that allows home owners near airports, sports stadiums and movie theaters to rent out parking spots in their driveways is coming to Seattle. ParkatmyHouse, a matchmaking service for drivers and property owners that’s popular in Europe and recently expanded to New York, Boston and D.C., plans to launch its service in Seattle later this month.

CHICAGO — The public radio program "This American Life" is retracting a story broadcast in January about Apple's operations in China, citing "numerous fabrications."

The Associated Press

By John Stang for Crosscut

Without a high school grammar teacher as a support staffer, Thurston County Superior Court Judge Thomas McPhee refereed contentious arguments and ruled Tuesday on the language for a proposed ballot on Washington's fledgling same-sex marriage law.

He tossed out the word favored by same-sex marriage foes: "Redefined."

It’s been a battle to get drug manufacturers to make medicines needed by people in developing countries, drugs to treat diseases expunged from wealthy nations. But what happens when the drugs finally reach these populations – do they work? Are they being used safely? Are there nasty side effects?

Becky Bartlein is trying to answer these questions as part of the newly formed Global Medicines Program at the University of Washington.

Read more on Humanosphere.

Crosscut

By Collin Tong at Crosscut

A coalition of local and global health groups have banded together to bring the lessons they’ve learned in developing countries to south King County, where the health index is as bad as Nairobi.

Read more on Humanosphere.

KPLU’s long-time translator serving West Seattle listeners at 88.1 FM is moving its frequency to 92.1 FM, effective March 14, 2012.

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