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News articles from KPLU

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Join fellow KPLU listeners and General Manager Paul Stankavich & Joey Cohn Director of Content April 26 - May 8, 2012 for a world-class culturally rich jazz adventure to the Baltic States and historic Saint Petersburg!

Highlights to this year's KPLU Travel Club journey include:  The highly-acclaimed Kaunas International Jazz Festival, historic walks in the charming capitals of Vilnius and Riga, bistro dining, outings to villages and visits to stunning National parks.

Charla Bear / KPLU

KPLU staff share their observations of wandering through the snow storm in Seattle.

Julien Harneis / Flickr

An anonymous humanitarian expert with years in the field writes about the things more “ordinary people” should understand about humanitarian aid:

"There’s always some woman at the Christmas party who, once she discovers what I do for a living, wants to talk my ear off about some awful idea she has about how to help poor children in El Salvador or Cambodia."

Read more on Humanosphere.

Top 10 blues CDs of 2011

Dec 28, 2011

Here are the top 10 blues CDs of 2011, according to KPLU's John Kessler, Host of “All Blues.”

KPLU's long-time signal to West Seattle at 88.1 FM may encounter interference due to a new radio station broadcasting on that same frequency beginning Monday, December 19.

Because of terrain and distance, it's possible that some KPLU listeners in West Seattle will still be able to hear the station, but others may experience some signal disruption.

At the present time, KPLU is unable to do anything about the interference. However, the station has a license application in to the FCC to move its West Seattle signal to a new frequency.

Wikimedia Commons

Each week in a new feature on our jazz blog – Groove Notes – we'll tell you about a few of the songs added to KPLU’s "All That Jazz" rotation by our music director Nick Francis.

This week’s picks are three tracks from Sarah Vaughan’s first long-play album “In Hi-Fi.”

Read more on Groove Notes.

Chick Corea's Website

On the heels of a nearly month-long celebration of his 70th birthday at the Blue Note in New York City (which included performances with ten different bands and 30 musicians) legendary jazz pianist Chick Corea will offer a rare opportunity for radio listeners tomorrow afternoon on KPLU.

At 12:15 p.m. Pacific Time Corea will be joining Kevin Kniestedt in the KPLU Seattle performance studio for a live interview and solo piano performance. This is a real treat for us as Corea so rarely offers performances of this type.

Read more on Groove Notes.

Chick Corea's Website

On the heels of a nearly month-long celebration of his 70th birthday at the Blue Note in New York City (which included performances with ten different bands and 30 musicians) legendary jazz pianist Chick Corea will offer a rare opportunity for radio listeners tomorrow afternoon on KPLU.

At 12:15 p.m. Pacific Time Corea will be joining Kevin Kniestedt in the KPLU Seattle performance studio for a live interview and solo piano performance. This is a real treat for us as Corea so rarely offers performances of this type.

Read more on Groove Notes.

extremeboh / Flickr

Seattle is connected to Rwanda in a number of ways, beginning with the country’s role as a major producer of high quality coffee beans for Starbucks and Costco. A number of local humanitarian organizations, as well as social enterprise business ventures, are active there.

KPLU and Humanosphere blogger Tom Paulson is headed to Rwanda along with a dozen or so other journalists sponsored by the International Reporting Project at Johns Hopkins University. For the next two weeks, he’ll be reporting on the trip and also posting stories on a number of Seattle projects at work there that have helped make Rwanda — despite its horrific recent past history — into what many see as an African success story.

Read more on Humanosphere.

Monktail Creative Music Concern / Flickr

KPLU’s Kevin Kniestedt kicks off his preview of the Earshot Jazz Festival today by interviewing executive director of Earshot, John Gilbreath.

“There is so much that wants to be done and needs to be done and should be done, and this is our attempt to do as much of it as we can,” Gilbreath said.

Leading up to opening night, we will be posting posts and questions as part of a preview to the festival, and during the festival we will be bringing you reviews, updates, and most importantly, your feedback.

Read more at Groove Notes.

KPLU

Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn says he's being patient with the Occupy Seattle protesters camping out for a second week in the downtown Westlake Park.

Occupy Seattle issued its own statement Tuesday saying it will stage a march Saturday in coordination with the Occupy Wall Street protest against corporate power.

Associated Press

SEATTLE — Seattle's self-style superhero Phoenix Jones wrote on his Facebook page that he was back on patrol Monday night.

He had to wear a backup costume after police seized his black and yellow outfit Sunday when they arrested him for investigation of assault. He is accused of using pepper spray on four people who were dancing after leaving a nightclub.

Test Survey

Oct 5, 2011

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Thanks for your support!

Oct 4, 2011

Thank you for sustaining KPLU during our Fall Fund Drive! Listeners have been exceptionally generous to KPLU over the years during our fund drives and this year has been no exception!

Thank you to everyone who supported us, and if you missed your chance you can still give now (until October 11th) to be counted!

Thank You!

We'd also like to thank the numerous businesses who supported our volunteers and staff with donations of food and beverage. See a list of these generous businesses.

This is it ... our Fall Fund Drive is coming to an end! We need 500 pledges by noon so make your gift now and be counted! Help KPLU reach its goal!

As an added incentive, listeners who pledge at the $500 level (or just $42/month) will recive an exclusive package with the opportunity to see NPR's Steve Inskeep at Town Hall on October 27th!

This package includes great tickets to the event, an exclusive reception with appetizers and drinks, as well as the opportunity for a meet & greet with Steve!

If that wasn't enough, we will also give you a signed copy of his new book, Instant City: Live and Death in Karachi.

There are only 10 pairs of tickets available, and they will go fast, so make your pledge now to secure your spot!

You may notice when listening to KPLU today that the fund drive sounds a little different ... What’s going on?

Well, because we know you like shorter fund drives and we do like to show gratitude to our listeners, we have given you back an entire day of regular programming smack in the middle of our spring fund drive!

If you have already supported our Fall Fund Drive, thank you! And, if you haven’t had a chance, you can show us how much you love having a FUND DRIVE FREE FRIDAY by making a pledge now!

Remember we can only have shorter fund drives because we are able to reach our fundraising goals. These goals are only met because of listeners like you who make it happen every time!

Enjoy your Friday and thanks again for all you do for KPLU!

All day today, your $60 pledge (or greater) earns you a 2 for 1 Coupon at Jazz Alley in Seattle!You don’t even have to give $60 all at once. Become a Sustaining Member and break that down to only $5/month and a hassle-free membership to KPLU!

Make your gift to KPLU now!

In addition, we have a special treat to donors pledging $365 or more during Morning Jazz, Afternoon Jazz and Evening Jazz.  We are celebrating Earshot Jazz Thursday, and have 25 pair of tickets to an exclusive Earshot Jazz Festival performance!

Jeff Bizzell

Singer Jacqui Naylor releases her 8th album, Lucky Girl, tomorrow. She is also performing tonight at Jazz Alley in Seattle as she kicks off her international tour. KPLU's Kevin Kniestedt spoke to Jacqui today about letting her fans choose the songs for her new album, her continued success with “acoustic smashing” and being the subject of a new documentary.

Read more on Groove Notes.

Justin Steyer / KPLU

Brazilian-born, New York-based pianist/vocalist, Eliane Elias, has covered a lot of musical territory in her recording career.  Some of her CD’s have been straight-ahead be-bop. Others have focused on Brazilian music. She has also very successfully transformed familiar pop tunes into fresh-sounding jazz. 

In this interview, KPLU’s Nick Francis asks Eliane how she balances all these approaches to music.

Associated Press

KPLU's Tom Paulson caught up with physician-activist Paul Farmer at the Clinton Global Initiative, the other big meeting in New York full of heads of state, celebs and bigwigs.

Farmer, the inspiring and controversial cyclist-celeb Lance Armstrong and others have joined in the clarion call to expand the global health agenda to include all the big killers.

Read more on Humanosphere.

A week of big meetings surrounding the United Nations in New York, including a pivotal discussion of tackling non-communicable diseases like cancer, heart disease and diabetes ... in poor countries.

Go to Humanosphere for Compelete coverage.

Dimitra Tzanos / Flickr

KPLU's Tom Paulson wondered over on our Humanosphere blog: "What has happened to our sense of ourselves as global citizens and how Sept. 11, 2001, may have altered matters of global health, foreign aid, development — basically, the global humanitarian agenda.

The short answer: It’s a mixed bag of good and bad, some clear signs of what many see as progress but also some disturbing lessons not learned."

Read more at Humanosphere.

Below are the stories KPLU produced in remembrance of 9/11 and its impact on people in the Northwest ten years later:

NEW: Memories of loss, ten years later at International Fountain at Seattle Center

On Sept. 11, 2001, and the following days, more than 30,000 people gathered at the International Fountain at Seattle Center for a flower vigil that became one of many spontaneous gatherings around the world. KPLU News Director Erin Hennessey says she was happy to be among them then and glad to be among a smaller but just as meaningful group 10 years later.

Roundup of regional 9/11 Anniversary ceremonies, memorials

How 9/11 changed one college student's path to adulthood
In early September of 2001, Kevin Finch moved from his childhood home in Puyallup, Wash., to the dorms at Pacific Lutheran University (PLU) to start his freshman year in college. His plan was to finish in 4 years with a degree in something related to health care, an idea that began to unravel on just his second day of class.
Read/listen to the rest of the story.

Solidarity and fear, the legacy of 9/11 in local Muslim community
“Right after nine-eleven there was a peak of hostility toward Muslims. It kind of went down a bit, but over the years it’s gone up again.” That’s how local Muslim-American Jeff (Jaffar) Siddiqui summarizes the decade since the Sept. 11th attacks.
Read/listen to the rest of the story.

Slade Gorton says 9/11 Commission got to the facts
On Sept. 11, 2001, former U.S. Senator Slade Gorton was at a conference in Leavenworth, Wash.  He'd gone out for an early morning run when he got word a plane had flown into the World Trade Center in New York.  He drove home to Seattle over a  Steven's Pass, which had almost no traffic on it,  trying to absorb the news of the attacks.
Read/listen to the rest of the story.

Cliff Mass, a professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Washington and KPLU’s new weather commentator, says it was Carl Sagan who first inspired him to get out into the public to popularize the science behind weather forecasting.

“I was an undergraduate at Cornell and in those days he was really into popularizing science. He was on the Tonight Show, and he was writing very popular books and a lot of that rubbed off,” Mass told KPLU.

Check out the video above for our complete interview with Cliff Mass.

The Ellis Marsalis Center for Music opened last week in the Musicians’ Village in New Orleans’s Upper 9th Ward.

The center is a performance hall and place where local students and musicians can make recordings, take classes and have access to computers and community rooms.

KPLU’s Kevin Kniestedt visited the site of the center in 2010.

Read more on Groove Notes.

Runs with Scissors / Flickr

CNN’s Global Public Square blog writes "... as the first unambiguous military enforcement of the Responsibility to Protect norm, Gadhafi’s utter defeat seemingly put new wind in the sails of humanitarian intervention."

Tom Paulson, blogger for KPLU's Humanosphere, has written on this topic before and continues the discussion on Humanosphere.

Bengt Nyman / Flickr

"Morning Edition" host Kirsten Kendrick and “All Blues” host John Kessler discuss the creation and inspiration behind Kessler’s new KPLU series: “The Blues Time Machine.”

Each week the new series follows one song through history – from its earliest recordings to its latest and, sometimes, most surprising interpretations. “The Blues Time Machine” airs on KPLU 88.5 on Fridays at 12:10 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday at 8 p.m. and 11 p.m.

If you listened to KPLU in the Skagit Valley area at 91.1 FM, please note that we had to move to a new frequency on Thursday afternoon. So for the foreseeable future, you can listen to us at 105.5 FM. Sorry for any inconvenience this may have caused.

The end of the Jazz Masters

Aug 2, 2011

For thirty years, the National Endowment for the Arts has honored jazz musicians with the highest award for the genre, the NEA Jazz Masters Award. However, in its latest appropriations request, the NEA removed specific reference to Jazz, Folk, and Opera.

The way KPLU’s Groove Notes blogger and Jazz on the Grooveyard host Kevin Kniestedt reads it, the new language means no more Jazz Masters.

Read more.

Associated Press

As the United Nations and the international community ramps up to airlift food and supplies into East Africa, mostly for starving Somali refugees, two perspectives on this crisis seemed especially interesting to Tom Paulson, who runs KPLU’s Humanosphere.

One: In Foreign Policy, Charles Kenny contends that, in this day and age, allowing a famine to occur is basically a crime against humanity.

Two: David Dickson, editor of the Science and Development Network, contends that the UN, Western powers and aid organizations could have been well-prepared for this crisis – if they had paid any attention to the scientific evidence.

Read more.

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