Jennifer Wing

Special Projects Reporter

Jennifer Wing is a Special Projects Reporter and on-call News Host for KPLU. She covers everything from education and the arts to politics. Jennifer is also a frequent contributor to Sound Effect.

Before joining KPLU in 1999, Jennifer worked for KGMI in Bellingham, WILM News Radio in Wilmington, Delaware and Northwest Cable News in Seattle. She got her start in public radio at WRTI and WHYY in Philadelphia.

Jennifer grew up in Philadelphia and received her Bachelor of Arts in Journalism from Temple University. She lives in Seattle with her partner and their two children.

One of her most unforgettable moments at KPLU was on February 28, 2001. She was on the top floor of the then un-retrofitted Seattle City Hall preparing to cover a press conference when the Nisqually Earthquake hit. The building felt like it was slammed by a giant truck. It swayed like a deck of cards. Luckily, the building stayed put. It was eventually replaced in 2003.

Ways to Connect

Emil Sjöblom / University of Washington

In developing and third-world countries, moving money around digitally can be very complicated and risky. Computer science professors and students at the University of Washington are trying to make that task easier and safer.

John Moore / AP

A new study published in Science Translational Medicine shows which part of the human brain is most affected by repeated exposure to blasts and explosions. Researchers are using the findings to help military veterans who suffer from Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.  

 

The findings show that region of the brain that appears to be most vulnerable to repeated blasts is the cerebellum.

AP Photo / Elaine Thompson

 

Oyster farmers in Willapa Bay are asking the Washington State Department of Ecology for permission, again, to use a neurotoxic chemical to get rid of native shrimp. Large numbers of the burrowing shrimp are turning the tide flats into quicksand, making the land unusable for growing oysters.

 

Elaine Thompson / AP

 

For the first time since the year 1910, most Seattle City Council members represent the neighborhoods they live in. And while hundreds of people turned out to see this younger and more diverse council be sworn in on Monday, there is one elected official the public continues to watch with great interest: socialist, Kshama Sawant.

LORI EANES

Back in 2007, Jennie Grant craved fresh goat’s milk. She got a taste of it in California and was surprised it wasn’t musty. She knew goats in Seattle weren’t legal. But she got one anyway, a white Mini LaMancha.  She named her Snowflake.

“The rules said you couldn’t keep farm animals such as sheep or cows. But if you love your goat and take them on a walk periodically, aren’t they pets also?” asked Grant. She thinks of Snowflake more of a pet than livestock.

Why does a tai chi business not have to pay sales tax, and an aikido school does? This a question the martial arts community is asking the State Department of Revenue. Starting in 2016 a new law will require all martial arts facilities to charge sales tax.

Jennie Grant

 

There are thousands of bald eagles living in Washington state. They are pretty adaptable and can live anywhere from a tall tree in the heart of a city to a remote forest along the coast. Wherever they are, they tend stay away from people.

 

It’s been months since young men showed up on the doorsteps of upstanding families in Pierce County delivering invitations and red roses to unsuspecting young ladies. Now, the event everyone has been preparing for is finally about the happen: Tacoma’s Holiday Cotillion.

 

Paula Wissel/KPLU

 

The University of Washington looking is at potential sites on its Seattle campus that could host a tent city. The news came at a forum on homelessness held last night at Seattle University.

 

Last year nearly 3,000 refugees from all over the world resettled in Washington state. Only 25 are from Syria. That number is expected to increase.

U.S. Coast Guard

 

In 1942, German U-boats were all over the North Atlantic. To avoid getting attacked, and to get supplies to the troops in Europe, the United States flew planes on a cold, remote route that hugged the top of the globe. They’d fly to Canada, then to Iceland, across Greenland, and if they were lucky, they’d eventually reach Great Britain.

 

The Seattle School District faces some ongoing challenges. This was one of the messages of the “State of the District” address delivered by Seattle Superintendent Larry Nyland.

Seattle Jobs Initiative

 

A Seattle non-profit is going to help ten states around the country figure out how to guide people on food stamps into living-wage jobs. An organization called Seattle Jobs Initiative is the recipient of a $3.6 million, two-year grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Elaine Thompson / AP

 

Seattle voters will soon decide the fate of Proposition 1, which at $930 million, is the largest levy in the city’s history.

Billed as Let’s Move Seattle, Proposition 1 promises to make getting around town easier and smoother. But opponents say there are good reasons why the measure should be voted down.

University of Washington's Center for Human Rights

 

The theft of a computer and hard-drive containing the names and stories of people who survived the war in El Salvador has human rights workers on edge. The break-in happened in Smith Hall, in the offices of the University of Washington’s Center for Human Rights, or CHR.

rytc / Flickr

 

The Seattle School Board is considering a plan that could lead to teenagers and tweens being more rested and ready to learn. A proposal is going before the board which calls for a later start time for middle schools and high schools.

Aerial of International District, 1969" by Seattle Municipal Archive is licensed under CC BY 2.0 Text And Color Were Added

Seattle voters are getting ready to choose who will represent their district. Seven district seats will be decided, as well at two at large positions. KPLU’s election series, Back On The Block, revisits issues affecting each district and introduces us to the candidates.

Jessica Farren

 

Anyone who is remotely interested in buying a horse should talk to Bonnie Hammond first.

“Caring for horses is expensive,” says Hammond.

Hammond is the executive director of SAFE, otherwise known as Save A Forgotten Equine.

She says if you buy a horse be prepared to spend serious money on food.

Ashley Gross / KPLU

 

As Seattle’s construction boom continues, the city council is laying the groundwork for digging into Mayor Ed Murray’s grand bargain with developers to build affordable housing.

The backbone of the city’s Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda, or HALA, is to charge developers of  commercial buildings a certain amount of money per square foot, known as a linkage fee.

Courtesy of the Low Income Housing Institute

 

One of the many challenges of being homeless is staying clean and having fresh clothes. An organization called the Low Income Housing Institute has two urban rest stops in Seattle, where people living on the streets or in their cars can take a shower and clean their clothes free of charge. One is downtown; the other is in the University District.

Jennifer Wing / KPLU

 


Six teams from the National Transportation Safety Board are in Seattle to start what will likely be a long investigation into Thursday’s fatal crash on the Aurora Bridge involving a Duck Boat, a charter bus and two cars.

Noemie Maxwell

The deed that landed Paul Rivers in jail for the rest of his life wasn’t a murder, it was stealing $330 from an espresso stand in Seattle’s University District. It was his third felony under Washington’s three strikes law.

That was back in 1993. He was 21 years old. After more than two decades in prison Rivers said, "I am no longer a threat to society.

Jennifer Wing / KPLU

 

A King County Superior Court judge says Tim Eyman’s latest initiative will not be removed from the November ballot.

Initiative 1366 requires the Legislature to put a constitutional amendment before voters that would reinstate a two-thirds legislative majority to raise taxes.

 

The threat if they don’t do this, is that the state’s 6.5 cent sales tax would be lowered to 5.5 cents, costing the state more than a billion dollars each year.

Courtesy of the Northwest Cahpter of the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of North America

 

Imagine having an illness that gives you horrible stomach cramps and makes you have to go to that bathroom a dozen times a day. Yet, to the outside world, you look completely healthy.

Having to explain all of those trips to the toilet can make for some awkward conversations.  This is what it can be like for people living with Crohn's Disease and colitis. It’s believed that these conditions affect more than one million people in United States. About 10 percent of those are children.

Jennifer Wing / KPLU

 

The National Football League is giving $2.5 million to the University of Washington to study concussions in an effort to make sports safer. The donation, which helps advance work already underway at the university, will help fund the Sports, Health, Safety Institute.

Along with figuring out better ways to prevent and treat concussions, researchers will look at a variety of preventable sports health issues.

People who want to live in a place with all of the amenities of a city but without Seattle’s housing prices are heading south. Real estate agents like Marguerite Giguere are noticing  the trend.

“They are people who would not be able to buy even a modest condo in Seattle and might have been looking to buy in places like Kent or Burien and then realize, ‘Wow, if I go to Kent or if I go to Burien, I’m going to be in a suburb.’”

MaplessinSeattle / Flickr

 

Seattle’s new law banning smoking in city parks is not getting in the way of this year’s Hempfest along the city’s waterfront.  It runs August 14-16 at Myrtle Edwards Park.

Jennifer Wing / KPLU

 

Affordable housing is one of the top campaign issues in Seattle’s City Council race.Eight candidates have come together to endorse what they call a “progressive housing plan.”

 

City Of Seattle

Seattle city officials want to put a stop to a scenario that’s playing out more often in this region’s tight and competitive housing market. It goes like this: landlords issue a staggering rent hike, tenants move out and not to long after that, the building undergoes a big remodel. It’s called an “economic eviction.”

 

This is how landlords avoid the responsibility of paying about $1500 to low-income tenants to help them find a new home. When landlords do this, tenants also lose the opportunity to collect a similar amount of money from the city for a total of more than $3,000.

Jennifer Wing


When you drive over the South Park Bridge you leave Georgetown and Boeing Field behind. You cross a super fund site, the Duwamish River. A picturesque marina filled with sailboats is off to the left.

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