Jennifer Wing

Special Projects Reporter

Jennifer Wing is a Special Projects Reporter and on-call News Host for KPLU. She covers everything from education and the arts to politics. Jennifer is also a frequent contributor to Sound Effect.

Before joining KPLU in 1999, Jennifer worked for KGMI in Bellingham, WILM News Radio in Wilmington, Delaware and Northwest Cable News in Seattle. She got her start in public radio at WRTI and WHYY in Philadelphia.

Jennifer grew up in Philadelphia and received her Bachelor of Arts in Journalism from Temple University. She lives in Seattle with her partner and their two children.

One of her most unforgettable moments at KPLU was on February 28, 2001. She was on the top floor of the then un-retrofitted Seattle City Hall preparing to cover a press conference when the Nisqually Earthquake hit. The building felt like it was slammed by a giant truck. It swayed like a deck of cards. Luckily, the building stayed put. It was eventually replaced in 2003.

Ways to Connect

Kyle Stokes / KPLU

 

 

A program credited with lifting the graduation rate and boosting student enrollment at Seattle’s Rainier Beach High School was going to be cut because of a lack of money.  But now, it’s being saved, thanks to a Seattle non-profit.

Jennifer Wing / KPLU

 

Japanese, Mandarin and Spanish: These are the languages hundreds of students are learning in the Seattle School District.

But funding is tight, which means the district is taking a hard look at its foreign language immersion programs. The district is wondering if these programs should be scaled back, expanded, or left as they are.

There are five elementary immersion schools in Seattle. Students can choose to continue their language studies in middle and high school.

 


The Tacoma School District says tests from last year reveal that three additional elementary schools and one other building that houses a Head Start program, have high lead levels. This follows the news from Monday that two other schools have lead in the water.

 

The three new elementary schools are: Whittier, DeLong and Manitou Park. Parents received phone calls and emails telling them that the water in these buildings is unsafe to drink or use for cooking due to elevated levels of lead.

Delaney Ruston

 

Several years ago Delaney Ruston, a doctor who specializes in internal medicine, started to notice that most of the kids coming into her office were glued to a screen.

Rich Pedroncell / AP Photo

Drinking fountains are now off limits at two elementary schools in Tacoma after tests revealed high levels of lead in the water. District officials had this information available to them for almost a year, but only looked at it for the first time late last week.

The schools are Mann Elementary and Reed Elementary.The district sent out an email and a phone message to all affected families.

 

A conference solely dedicated to the topic of hate crimes is happening in Burien next week. The Hate Crimes Conference is being organized by a Seattle police officer whose job involves bridging trust between police and the city’s LGBTQ community.

 

David Gang / Washington State University

 

Orange, grapefruit, lemon and lime orchards are being wiped out across Florida from a plague called citrus greening disease. A team of scientists from Washington State University in Pullman is studying the bacterium that causes the condition. They hope to find a cure.

David Gang, a biological chemist at Washington State University, said the bacterium that causes greening disease is transmitted by a psyllid, a winged insect about half the size of a fruit fly, which spreads it from tree to tree.

 

Gary Davis / KPLU

 

Seattle’s Green Lake is known for having water resembling pea soup. But by the end of this week, the color of the lake will we be transformed to a color that’s almost tropical.

Courtesy of the Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences

 

Children who are raised in a bilingual home appear to have a head start in building the part of the brain that deals with everything from impulse control to mental flexibility. These findings are in a new study that’s out of the University of Washington’s Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences.

Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research

 

A new study shows that some one-on-one attention paid to Latinas can boost the likelihood they will be screened for breast cancer.

For the study, low-income Latinas were visited by a Spanish-speaking health care worker called a "promotora" who provided them with information about getting a mammogram. After the visit, the women received a follow-up phone call, reminding them to make an appointment.

 

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

The recreational marijuana industry is Washington state is predicted to hit a new high in the coming weeks.  

Kids Co.

 

Space is tight and you will probably have to find a new home. This is the message the Seattle School District is sending to the before- and after-school childcare programs that are housed in elementary school buildings.

Charles Mickelson, owner and operator of Seattle Qwik Tour.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray wants to cut down on distracted driving by prohibiting drivers of tour busses from talking to passengers.

King County

 

Last year, nearly 1,800 King County  juveniles were booked into detention. Judges and attorneys say this can have a lasting, negative impact on a child.

Jennifer Wing

 

Apps on our phones, our watches and other devices are constantly gathering data about our health. A new study from the University of Washington shows that there can be a huge gap in expectations when patients want their doctor to review this information.

Jennifer Wing

An exhibit about the life of Anne Frank is currently on view at the Holocaust Center for Humanity in Seattle. It’s called, "Anne Frank: A History For Today." When it closes at the end of May, two strong connections to Anne Frank will remain in Seattle.

If you go to the exhibit, you will see large panels, about seven feet tall, lining the walls.They are split in half. The top has photos and text that chronicle the rise of Adolf Hitler, the Nazi Party and the horrors of the Holocaust. The lower half of the panels is all about Anne Frank and her family.

 

Miguel Fraga

An official from Cuba’s embassy in the U.S. is visiting Seattle for the next few days. Miguel Fraga is the First Secretary of the newly re-established Cuban Embassy in Washington D.C. Fraga is in town to tell people about his home country.

University of Washington, Special Collections.


In the last five years, more than 14,000 construction permits have been issued by the city of Seattle. A new sea wall is being built along the waterfront, as well as a tunnel for traffic.

 

But what’s going on today is nothing compared to what was happening here in the late 1800s.  

What Seattle looked like when the first white settlers arrived, and how they transformed the landscape, is explored in a recent book. It’s called "Too High And Too Steep, Reshaping Seattle's Topography."

Courtesy of the city of Seattle

Massive amounts of human waste and trash, as well as dirty needles litter the green belt and dirt lots under and around a stretch of  I-5 known as The Jungle. These findings are laid out in a 24-page report that was put together in response to a shooting that killed two people and wounded three last month.

Most of the land, which covers 150 acres between South Dearborn and South Lucille Streets, is owned by the state. At a presentation of the report to Seattle City Council, Councilwoman Sally Bagshaw said the situation under I-5 is a clear threat to public health.

Elaine Thompson / AP

 

A massive die-off of sea stars a few years ago was caused by a virus. But a study published this week shows that higher water temperatures also played a big role.

 

If you have a loved one who is mentally ill and they are a danger to themselves, there are places they can be involuntarily committed so they can receive help.

Kyle Stokes / KPLU

Early returns show voters in Seattle and in other parts of Western Washington are saying yes to school levies that would help pay for everything from basic supplies to teacher salaries and new buildings.

 

The two levies for the Seattle school district add up to more than $1 billion. Both are both passing by healthy margins.

 

Elaine Thompson / AP

 

When you go to a doctor or hospital that is part of your insurance plan, you can sometimes get hit with bills requiring you to pay the full amount.

 

Elaine Thompson / AP

In the wake of last week’s shooting in Seattle that killed two people and injured three, officials from state and local agencies are trying to gain a better understanding of where the crime happened.

 

There are more than 35,000 public school students who are homeless in Washington state. That’s according to the state Office of Public Instruction.

 

Under a new agreement, Seattle’s Harborview Medical Center clearly lays out its commitment to serve the poor.  Staff from the University of Washington will continue to provide care.

 

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

 

From the Methow Valley to Seattle and everywhere in between, school districts will be going directly to voters on February 9 to ask them to say “yes” to higher taxes so that schools can keep paying for teachers' salaries, supplies and so that new buildings can be constructed to ease overcrowding.

 

Iqbal Osman / Flickr

Editor’s Note: This story originally ran as part of our new show, “Sound Effect,” which airs on Saturdays at 10 a.m.

Before there was a birth control pill for women, there existed a pill for men. It showed a lot of promise — until whiskey ruined everything. 

Jennifer Wing / KPLU

 

Sound Transit's light rail line will soon be carrying passengers to the University of Washington. The agency says service to UW and Capitol Hill will begin on Saturday, March 19.

 

Tom Paulson / Humanosphere

Two lawsuits that stem from the 2013 election involving Washington state and the Grocery Manufacturer’s Association, could soon be resolved in a Thurston County courtroom

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