Ed Ronco

Morning Edition Producer

Ed Ronco came to KPLU in October 2013 as producer and reporter for KPLU’s Morning Edition. He’s been reporting news since he was 18, but Ed started in public radio in 2009 at KCAW in Sitka, Alaska, where he covered everything from city government, to education, crime, science, the arts and more. Prior to public radio, Ed worked in newspapers, including four years at the South Bend (Ind.) Tribune, where he covered business, then politics and government.

Ed grew up in Wyandotte, Mich., a suburb of Detroit, and earned his bachelor’s degree in journalism from Michigan State University. Since moving to Seattle, Ed says he’s learned patience from area freeways, moderation from area Thai restaurants, and discipline from his alarm clock, which wakes him up each day at 3 a.m.

Ways To Connect

Daniel Peckham / Flickr

Amsterdam is the largest city in The Netherlands, and a hub for air travel in and out of Europe. KPLU travel expert Matthew Brumley says there are similarities between western Washington and the Dutch capital.

“It’s a great city to get a bike and cruise around,” Brumley said. “There are some phenomenal museums here, and some great architecture.”

Coffee Culture

Eric Peacock / Flickr

King County officials are asking local voters to support a property tax hike so local law enforcement officers, firefighters and other emergency first-responders can get an upgrade for their aging radio system. 

“It’s about 18 years old. And the problem is twofold," said Marlin Blizinsky, with the Puget Sound Emergency Radio Network. "One is that the system is wearing out.”

Moyan Brenn / Flickr

One of the casualties of the global economic crisis late last decade was Iceland's economy. Unemployment soared, banks toppled and protests ensued.

And then came tourism.

It wasn’t a silver bullet, but it helped bring Iceland’s economy back from the brink. The island nation’s popularity among global travelers is on the rise.

This One Time In Sicily, And Other Travel Surprises

Apr 9, 2015
Ed Ronco / KPLU

Picture it: Sicily, 2012.

KPLU travel expert Matthew Brumley is in Palermo, checking in to a B&B for the night. They tell him the room has low ceilings.

“And that’s OK,” he said. “I’m not a tall guy.”

Santiago Duarte / Flickr

Craig Holt knows coffee.

In 1997, he started the Seattle-based Atlas Coffee Importers. Now, he travels to do business in coffee-growing regions of the world. One of those places is Colombia, in South America.

3 Places To Visit In B.C., Far Away From Vancouver

Mar 26, 2015
Philip Stone

Last week, KPLU travel expert Matthew Brumley highlighted a trip through British Columbia and along the Canadian Rockies, along the Alberta boundary. But the conversation was broad, and we thought it would be worthwhile to revisit B.C. and focus on some special places.

Ed Ronco / KPLU

So you want to get away for a summer vacation, but you'd rather not spend a fortune, and you'd rather not travel overseas. 

Head north, says KPLU travel expert Matthew Brumley.

Mark Stevens / Flickr

For an escape to the American Southwest -- with its open deserts, dark skies, and peaceful solitude -- begin in bright, noisy and busy Las Vegas.

That's the advice of KPLU travel expert Matthew Brumley, but only because flights to the nightlife hotspot are relatively inexpensive. You can stay if you want, of course, or you can strike out into the countryside for some of the most beautiful scenery available in the United States.

5 Things To Expect If You Ever Go To North Korea

Mar 5, 2015
Jon Chol Jin / AP

For Americans, an independent trip to North Korea can be a risky venture.

A Lynnwood man was just returned to the United States after being imprisoned there for more than a year. And the U.S. State Department strongly urges Americans not to go to North Korea. But it’s not off limits. Tour groups have been able to visit.

Jacquelyn Martin / AP

March 2 is the birthday of Theodor Geisel, better known to readers everywhere as Dr. Seuss. He would have turned 111 this year.

KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and Ed Ronco remembered the children's author during Monday's Morning Edition ... in full Seussian rhyme.

Ed Ronco / KPLU

Editor's Note: KPLU's Ed Ronco and travel expert Matthew Brumley spent a week in Cuba, along with approximately 30 KPLU listeners, at the beginning of February. This week's "Going Places" is a reflection on that trip, written by Ed Ronco.

The view from the north-facing windows of Havana's Hotel Nacional looks at Cuba's most famous sidewalk, the Malecon. Here, joggers dodge crashing waves from the Atlantic Ocean on stormy afternoons, and young couples walk quietly, hand-in-hand, during the breezy night. On the weekends, it's busy with people of all ages drinking rum, smoking cigars, talking, singing, laughing and dancing. It stretches five miles along the shore of this country's capital city.

Kaitlyn Bernauer

On the morning of Sept. 29, 1995, a woman was alone in her Yakima home, feeding her baby, when she heard an unusual noise. She found a man in the house, wearing a white nylon stocking over his face.

She tried to run, but couldn’t get away. He put a mask on her and raped her. And when he was done, she was left tied to the crib that held her crying child.

5 Tips For Americans On Visiting Iran

Feb 19, 2015
Mohammadali F. / Flickr

Iran has long been on KPLU travel expert Matthew Brumley's list of places to visit. He consulted tour guide Martin Klimenta of MIR Corporation about the value of traveling to the enormous Middle Eastern nation. 

Anupam Nath / AP Photo

Facebook: It’s the first thing I look at when I wake up, and the last thing I look at before going to bed.

Which begs the question: Am I addicted to Facebook? Or is it just a harmless pastime?

I went to talk to an expert, Dr. Megan Moreno at Seattle Children’s Hospital. She’s the principal investigator of the Social Media and Adolescent Research Team (SMART), which studies problematic Internet usage.

Martin Sojka / Flickr

Editor's note: This week on Going Places, KPLU travel expert Matthew Brumley sends a special guest in his place. 

Some 53 million people live in Myanmar (or, if you’re looking at an older map, “Burma”), in big cities and small towns, in the mountains and on the coast. The government is loosening its economic controls, and that has resulted in an influx of foreign money spent by visitors traveling from Asia, Europe and, more and more, North America.

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