Anna King

Richland Correspondent

Anna King calls Richland, Washington home and loves unearthing great stories about people in the Northwest. She reports for the Northwest News Network from a studio at Washington State University, Tri-Cities. She covers the Mid-Columbia region, from nuclear reactors to Mexican rodeos.

The South Sound was her girlhood backyard and she knows its rocky beaches, mountain trails and cities well. She left the west side to attend Washington State University and spent an additional two years studying language and culture in Italy.

While not on the job, Anna enjoys trail running, clam digging, hiking and wine tasting with friends. She's most at peace on top a Northwest mountain with her husband Andy Plymale and their muddy Aussie-dog Poa.

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A Richland, Washington, florist will pay $1,000 in fines to the state. The flower shop had discriminated against a same-sex couple that wanted flowers for their wedding in 2013.

Several artists in southcentral Washington state are responding to last month’s Pasco shooting.

Kai-Huei Yau

The Hanford Nuclear Reservation is one of the most contaminated sites on earth. And Susan Leckband is using her natural curiosity to help clean it up.

  As a girl Leckband just had to call the Frito-Lay company. Their number was clear, right on the back of the crinkly package. And she was curious.

Leckband’s mother and father were not amused.

Herrmann Scholbe


The family of a man shot by police in Pasco, Washington this month is challenging police investigators' autopsy findings.

An attorney representing Antonio Zambrano-Montes' widow said in a press release Thursday police shot the man up to seven times, twice from behind.

Nicholas K. Geranios / AP Photo


Kennewick police investigating the police shooting this month of Antonio Zambrano-Montes told reporters Wednesday bullets entered him from the front, and a rock was found near his body.

Officers fired 17 rounds. Of those, one autopsy shows Zambrano-Montes took five shots, the other said six.

Anna King

New facts are emerging in the police shooting of 35-year-old Mexican farmworker Antonio Zambrano-Montes in Pasco, Washington.

Several cellphone videos posted on YouTube show the shooting in grainy but graphic detail. Zambrano-Montes was reportedly throwing rocks in a crowded intersection. Police arrived, tried to stop him then used a Taser on him. Zambrano-Montes ran across the intersection. Shots were fired.

AP Photo/Dario Infante


All the bullet fragments have been recovered from the Pasco police shooting scene and body of Antonio Zambrano-Montes, according to the Kennewick Police Department. 

The department is leading an investigation into last week’s police shooting in southeast Washington.

AP Photo/Dario Infante


Community leaders in Pasco, Washington are asking for a federal investigation by the Department of Justice, though it's not yet clear if they'll get their wish.

Pasco police shot and killed Antonio Zambrano-Montes last Tuesday. Witnesses say he had been throwing rocks at a busy intersection.

Anna King


Tuesday night’s shooting of a man near a popular grocery store by three Pasco police officers has angered many residents there. The shooting was captured in several phone videos (embedded below).

Toddlers, teens, parents and grandparents gathered outside Pasco City Hall on Wednesday night to protest the police shooting.

A man allegedly throwing rocks in Pasco near a popular Latino grocery store was shot dead by police officers Tuesday night.

A YouTube video (embedded below) shows several police officers running after a man across a crowded intersection. Some bystanders caught the incident on cell phone footage and posted the clip.

Anna King


Hanford Nuclear Reservation officials Tuesday made public their plan to improve safety for workers in the so-called “tank farms.”

Hanford is home to 56 million gallons of radioactive sludge left over from World War II and the Cold War.

National Weather Service


Scientists don't yet agree on the cause behind the dirty rain that pelted much of eastern Washington and Oregon last Friday.

The National Weather Service said the dirt may have come from southeast Oregon, near Summer Lake. But another government scientist says he thinks it was ash from a volcano in Japan.



Washington state agriculture officials are preparing for the scenario that highly-contagious bird flu will be in the Northwest — maybe for years.

Since December, Washington state and the U.S. Department of Agriculture have euthanized sick birds and set up quarantines from the Tri-Cities to Port Angeles.

Anna King


Washington state agriculture officials have just finished up the grim task of euthanizing nearly 5,000 birds in Okanogan County.

Now veterinarians will continue to sweep the quarantine zones around those farms to find out whether bird flu viruses there have spread.

U.S. Department of Energy


President Barack Obama’s budget would spend $2.3 billion on cleanup at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in 2016.

But it shifts the focus of cleanup. The proposed budget would spend more on cleanup of the tank waste and a massive plant meant to treat that sludge. But the president’s proposed budget would cut about $100 million from the Department of Energy’s Richland Operations office.



Another new case of bird flu has popped up in northern Washington state. This one is a hobby and 4-H program flock in Oroville, Washington, not far from the Canadian border.

It’s mostly chickens and waterfowl. Another, larger flock 40 miles south in Riverside, Washington is on the chopping block as early as Tuesday.

Anna King


Washington state has set a six-mile quarantine circle around a new major bird flu site in near Riverside in north-central Washington.

About 5,000 birds — mainly ducks but also geese, turkeys and chickens — are in the infected flock.

Anna King

Government agriculture officials will kill 5,000 pheasants and turkeys due to a bird flu outbreak at a hunting operation Washington's Okanogan county.

About 40 birds at a game farm in Riverside, Wash. were ill over the weekend and tested positive for bird flu. The U.S. Department of Agriculture and the state of Washington will kill the entire flock and establish a quarantine around it.

Seattle E.R. nurse Marc Bouma is back in the Northwest after treating Ebola patients in a remote part of Liberia.

Anna King


Three new hot spots of bird flu have been found in wild ducks and domestic birds in Idaho.

A second Oregon case was confirmed last week in a wild duck near Eugene. And a flock of 118 birds was euthanized over the weekend in Port Angeles, Washington.

Anna King


Several major markets for U.S. poultry products have shut down trade after discoveries of avian flu in the west, including the Tri-Cities, Washington.

Now the U.S. Department of Agriculture is testing flocks there.

Cynthia Goldsmith / CDC


Lab workers at the Washington State University secure pathogen labs in Pullman and Puyallup are working overtime to test avian flu cases from poultry in the Northwest.

Atomic Heritage Foundation


When the federal government decided to make plutonium in southeast Washington, early farmers and whole villages of Native Americans were kicked out. Now a new collection of oral histories tells some of these stories of the Hanford site.



An environmental cleanup company with engineering headquarters in Richland, Washington has just flown its second water treatment system to Japan with a massive plane.

It’s intended to treat thousands of gallons of radioactive water leaking from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant.

Anna King


A slowdown at western ports is now aggravating farmers across the Northwest.

Produce processors are laying off production line workers. Apples are backing up. And the summer’s premium hay is stacked in sheds and not moving.

U.S. Department of Energy


A bill that passed Thursday in the U.S. House includes big changes for the Tri-Cities. 

The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 would create a new set of national parks in honor of the top-secret Manhattan Project. That would include a museum at Hanford and other historical sites.

Courtesy of the Kilian Family.

Farmers in eastern Washington are busy festooning their dusty machines with thousands of Christmas lights for the annual Sunnyside Lighted Farm Implement Parade.

Tobin Fricke / Wikimedia


For the third time this week, there are calls to protect workers from hazardous vapors at Hanford, this time from Washington’s congressional delegation.

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

Three groups with ties to the Hanford Nuclear Reservation announced Thursday they intend to sue the federal government and its contractor.

They say Hanford leaders aren’t doing enough to protect workers from harmful radioactive tank vapors.


Workers at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation have been complaining of vapors from radioactive sludge for decades. They say the fumes give them sore throats, headaches and dizziness. 

Now Washington state says it intends to sue the U.S. Department of Energy in 90 days if more isn’t done to protect these workers.