Alison Marcotte

KPLU Summer Intern
Courtesy of MOHAI, Timothy Eagan Collection

On August 21, 1964, four young musicians from Liverpool performed to an eager crowd of 14,300 at Seattle Center Coliseum, now known as KeyArena. Seattle was the third stop on The Beatles’ first U.S. tour. The concert was also the first one ever held at the coliseum.

“The event was a phenomenon,” said Seattle radio personality Pat O’Day, who introduced the Beatles to the sold-out auditorium 50 years ago. “It opened the door and our eyes to what the concert business could be.”

Courtesy of James Leder / / Idle No More Washington

Flanked by Puget Sound on one side and railroad tracks on the other, dozens of people gathered at Seattle’s Olympic Sculpture Park on Monday to bring attention to protecting the Salish Sea — the waters of Puget Sound, Georgia Strait and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. 

The coalition of environmental groups and Native Americans voiced their opposition to the increased traffic in coal- and oil trains, as well as the proposed coal terminals that would be built in Longview and on the Great Lummi Nation’s sacred burial ground.

Courtesy of Yoshiko Matsushima / The North American Post

Fumiko Uyeda Groves was 11 years old when the atomic bomb “Little Boy” was dropped on Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945. She was living in Seattle at the time, having returned four months earlier after being incarcerated at Idaho’s Minidoka Relocation Center for three years.

anaxila / Flickr

People can expect to hear the roar of the Blue Angels zooming above Lake Washington this weekend. After missing last year’s Boeing Seafair Air Show due to sequestration cuts, the Blue Angels have returned to Seattle.

The noise of the planes may be bothersome to neighbors, but audiologist Susan Anderson says it doesn’t pose a health risk.

Alison Marcote / KPLU

When 10-year-old Mohamed Mohamed thinks of Yesler Terrace, the word “community” comes to mind.

“It’s not one of those quiet neighborhoods where you’re staying at home playing video games or anything like that,” he said. “It’s somewhere where you can play outside and meet new people.”

Mohamed says he has lived in Yesler Terrace, Seattle’s oldest housing project, his whole life.

“It’s very sad they’re changing it into like houses that have elevators,” he said. “It’s not going to be the same; it’s not going to be low-income anymore. It’s just going to be sad.”

Kurt Clark / Flickr

As temperatures hike into the high 80s this week, many will be flocking to beaches to cool down. But some swimming areas in Bellevue will be temporarily shutting down this week, specifically Bellevue’s Newcastle, Meydenbauer and Clyde beach parks.

The culprit for the closures is milfoil, an invasive weed that the state Department of Ecology views as the most problematic plant in Washington. The city of Bellevue and homeowners will be applying herbicide to shoreline areas adjacent to the three beach parks to control invasive milfoil blooms.

Malcolm Griffes / KPLU

When Michael Wells was growing up in Normal, Illinois, his dad would frequently come home from work wearing a pin that had a little blood drop.

“I was always fascinated by it, because my dad never wore any kind of jewelry or anything,” Wells said.

When Wells asked about the pin, his father told him it signaled he'd given blood.

Alison Marcotte / KPLU

Capt. Larry Kezner blows the horn of the Fremont Avenue passenger vessel and undocks his boat from South Lake Union Park. Andy Kim’s popular ‘70s tune “Rock Me Gently” plays through the speakers as Kezner steers the boat around the southern shore of Lake Union. “Funky” background music is a staple of Kezner’s tours.

“Welcome aboard the Fremont Avenue,” he says over the intercom to the 24 passengers on board. “Thank you guys for coming out. Good sports for the cloudy day here.”

Courtesy of Jal Schrof/Ethnic Heritage Council

The Fourth of July will carry a new meaning for 431 people at Seattle Center’s Fisher Pavilion. At noon, candidates will be sworn in as U.S. citizens at the 30th annual naturalization ceremony hosted by the nonprofit Ethnic Heritage Council.

“It’s a great reminder of why we celebrate the Fourth of July. It’s not all about fireworks and picnics; it’s about love for this country,” said Alma Plancich, executive director of the Ethnic Heritage Council.