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A Closer Look At Sexual Assaults On Campus
9:32 pm
Wed October 15, 2014

Harvard Law Professors Say New Sexual Assault Policy Is One-Sided

A group of professors at Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Mass., has slammed the school's new sexual assault policy, saying it gives victims an unfair advantage.
Darren McCollester Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 7:32 am

Just a few months after Harvard University announced a new, tougher policy against campus sexual assault, a group of Harvard law professors is blasting the rules as unfair.

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Shots - Health News
8:29 pm
Wed October 15, 2014

How A No-Touch Thermometer Detects A Fever

A school official shows a pupil an infrared digital laser thermometer before taking his temperature in Lagos, Nigeria, in September. Starting this week, similar hand-held devices are checking foreheads for fever at some U.S. airports.
Akintunde Akinleye Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 8:39 am

In the battle to stop Ebola's spread, health officials worldwide have been deploying thermometers in hopes of detecting the earliest symptoms among people who might be sick. The no-contact thermometer, already broadly used in some airports in Africa, has come to U.S. airports this week — now at New York's John F. Kennedy Airport, and, starting Thursday, at D.C.'s Dulles, Chicago's O'Hare, Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson, and Newark's Liberty.

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The Two-Way
1:36 pm
Wed October 15, 2014

In 2014, U.S. Budget Deficit Falls To Pre-Recession Level

Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 1:44 pm

As tax revenues increased and spending cuts took effect, the 2014 budget deficit dropped to the lowest level in six years.

In a statement, the Treasury Department hailed the news by pointing out a few key figures:

-- "The deficit in FY 2014 fell to $483 billion, $197 billion less than the FY 2013 deficit and $165 billion less than forecast in President Obama's FY 2015 Budget."

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Goats and Soda
1:34 pm
Wed October 15, 2014

Ebola Evacuees: Who Are They, Where'd They Go, How'd They Fare?

Dr. Kent Brantly was treated for Ebola at Emory University Hospital after becoming infected at the Monrovia hospital where he worked.
Courtesy of Samaritan's Purse

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 8:40 am

Ten days ago, Ashoka Mukpo, an NBC freelance cameraman who caught Ebola in West Africa, arrived in Omaha, Neb., for treatment.

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All Tech Considered
12:03 pm
Wed October 15, 2014

Weekly Innovation: Your New Pet Robot

Jr., a consumer robot in development, could soon be an extra set of eyes and ears in your home.
Roambotics

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 1:26 pm

Remember "Weebo," the floating robot from Robin Williams' 1997 movie Flubber? A cute yellow bot that lived with Williams' absent-minded professor character, "she" was a loveable gadget that seemed far-fetched at the time. But fast-forward 17 years and Weebo is a whole lot closer to fact than fiction.

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All Tech Considered
12:00 pm
Wed October 15, 2014

'Why Kids Sext' Describes Nude Photos As 'Social Currency' Among Teens

"The sexts are currency," explains Hanna Rosin. Teenage girls told Rosin boys collect the photos like "baseball cards or Pokemon cards."
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 3:55 pm

In April, residents of Louisa County, Va., were shocked to learn of a sexting "ring" among the town's teenagers. When Hanna Rosin asked teens from Louisa County High School how many people they knew who had sexted, a lot of them replied: "Everyone." But what was originally characterized in the media as an organized criminal affair was soon revealed to be widespread teen behavior.

"I think we as a culture don't know whether to be utterly alarmed by sexting, or think of it as a normal part of teenage sexual experimentation," Rosin tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

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Book Reviews
11:59 am
Wed October 15, 2014

'The Assassination Of Margaret Thatcher' And Other Stories From Hilary Mantel

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 10:57 am

A new Hilary Mantel book is an Event with a "capital "E." Here's why: The first two best-selling novels in Mantel's planned trilogy about Thomas Cromwell, Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies, each won the Man Booker Prize — that's a first.

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The Two-Way
11:59 am
Wed October 15, 2014

At Least 20 Trekkers Die In Blizzard, Avalanche In Nepal's Himalayas

A view of Machhapuchhre (center) and the Annapurna Himalaya from Gulmi, Nepal.
Sunil Sharma Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 9:47 pm

At least a dozen trekkers have been killed in unseasonable blizzards and an avalanche in the foothills of Nepal's Himalayan mountain range.

NPR's Julie McCarthy, reporting from New Delhi, says locals and international tourists are among the dead. Rescuers say those killed include four Canadians, two Poles, an Israeli, an Indian and a Nepali.

The Wall Street Journal says:

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Monkey See
11:58 am
Wed October 15, 2014

Pop Culture Happy Hour, Small Batch: A Report From New York Comic-Con

Costumes were plentiful at the New York Comic-Con at Jacob Javitz Center.
Daniel Zuchnik Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 10:55 am

Friend Of PCHH and NPR Books editor Petra Mayer recently returned from New York Comic-Con, so we asked her to talk a little about what she did while she was up there. As it happens, she kept herself very busy, moderating a panel full of authors she admires and chatting up one of the biggest nerd icons of her (and my) pop-culture coming-of-age.

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Goats and Soda
10:06 am
Wed October 15, 2014

What Will Malala's Nobel Peace Prize Mean For Girls' Education?

Afghan schoolgirls take lessons outdoors at a refugee camp near Jalalabad.
Noorullah Shirzada AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 12:23 pm

When Malala Yousafzai found out last Friday that she'd won the Nobel Peace Prize, along with Indian activist Kailash Satyarthi, the 17-year-old Pakistani girl didn't celebrate immediately. Instead she returned to a chemistry class at her high school in Birmingham, England.

It was a fitting reaction by someone who's risked her life for the right to be educated.

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The Protojournalist
10:05 am
Wed October 15, 2014

What Is Really Tearing America Apart

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 8:16 am

What separates Americans the most?

Race ... religion ... gender ...

According to Shanto Iyengar, a political scientist at Stanford University, often the most divisive aspect of contemporary society is: politics.

Divided We Stand

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The Salt
10:02 am
Wed October 15, 2014

The Texas Road Food Takeover: Smoked, Fried And Tex-Mex

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 12:22 pm

Recently, a friend and I rode bicycles from Brownsville, Texas, to Oklahoma, 738 miles from the Rio Grande to the Red River, just for the hell of it. Naturally, eating was the highlight of the journey. The trip turned into a 13-mph tour of Texas's evolving food geography.

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Shots - Health News
10:00 am
Wed October 15, 2014

Ebola In The United States: What Happened When

Scenes from an outbreak: Ebola survivor Dr. Kent Brantly; Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas; A worker cleans the apartment where Ebola victim Thomas Eric Duncan stayed in Dallas; experimental vaccine; the Carnival Magic cruise ship off Cozumel, Mexico.
Jessica McGowan/Getty; Mike Stone/Getty Images; Jim Young/Reuters/Landov; Steve Parsons/AP; Angel Castellanos/AP

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 9:42 am

When Ebola virus resurfaced in West Africa in December 2013, public health officials were hopeful that it could be contained, as it had been in past outbreaks.

But the virus continues to ravage communities in Africa and has now spread to the United States and Europe. The number of new cases in Africa make it likely that there will be more cases in other countries.

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The Two-Way
9:23 am
Wed October 15, 2014

Pentagon Reportedly Hushed Up Chemical Weapons Finds In Iraq

Soldier of U.S. Army 173rd Airborne Brigade prior to an air analysis mission near an oil and gas separation plant at the Baba Gurgur oil field outside northern Iraq's town of Kirkuk in May 2003.
Shamil Zhumatov Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 9:33 am

The New York Times is reporting that on several occasions, U.S. forces involved in Iraq after the 2003 invasion came across aging stockpiles of chemical weapons and that several service members were injured by their exposure to toxic agents.

The Times reports in an extensive article:

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Book News & Features
9:16 am
Wed October 15, 2014

Get To Know The Finalists For The 2014 National Book Award

NPR

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 11:18 am

The National Book Awards shortlists — for fiction, nonfiction, poetry and young people's literature — were announced Wednesday on Morning Edition by Mitchell Kaplan, co-founder of Miami Book Fair International and former president of the American Booksellers Association. Read more about each of the finalists below.

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