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Shots - Health News
9:17 am
Fri October 17, 2014

Take Your Medicine, Tap Your Phone And Collect A Prize

A view of the rewards screen on the Mango Health app.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 3:10 pm

As a neurosurgeon in Connecticut, Dr. Katrina Firlik saw too many patients make the same mistakes, over and over again.

At her hospital in Greenwich she'd see patients with hemorrhagic strokes that could have been prevented. "They didn't take their hypertension medications for the last couple decades," she says.

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It's All Politics
4:22 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Recent Rulings Alter Voting Laws Ahead Of November Election

Election worker Dorothy Davis checks a voter's ID during Arkansas' party primary elections in May. After a state Supreme Court ruling, Arkansas' voter ID law won't be in effect for the November elections.
Danny Johnston AP

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 12:50 pm

Election Day is 2 1/2 weeks away and early voting has already started in many places. So here's a recap for all those trying to keep track of the flurry of last-minute legal activity involving state voting laws:

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Code Switch
4:20 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Navajo Presidential Race Shaken By Language Gap

Navajo presidential candidate Chris Deschene greets supporters ahead of a hearing in Window Rock, Ariz., to determine whether Deschene is fluent enough in Navajo to qualify for the presidency.
Felicia Fonseca AP

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 1:57 pm

According to Navajo law, Navajo Nation presidents must speak the Navajo language to hold office. Chris Deschene is a strong contender for the position, but there's a problem: He's not fluent in the language.

The challenge to Deschene's candidacy has become a window into how the Navajo Nation views itself and its cultural future, as well as how Native people continue to define themselves in the face of cultural change.

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All Tech Considered
4:17 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

When Disaster Strikes, Facebook Lets Friends Know You're OK

Facebook

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 5:12 pm

In the aftermath of disasters like earthquakes, fires and severe weather events, the rush to both alert and check on family and friends can crash telecommunications networks. During the freak 2011 Virginia earthquake, which rattled the nation's capital and damaged the Washington Monument, panicked phone calls quickly overloaded the phone network.

Facebook's newest tool, known as Safety Check, aims to allow people to quickly alert friends and family that they are safe after a natural disaster.

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All Tech Considered
2:50 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Airbnb, New York State Spar Over Legality Of Rentals

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 6:24 am

Airbnb has a problem. The website for short-term room rentals is growing quickly. But in many cities, these rentals are illegal. Now, New York's attorney general has documented the extent of the illegal activity, by delving into the company's business records.

Almost three-quarters of New York City bookings appear to break the law, he says.

Thousands of these bookings happen every day in buildings all over New York, like the studio that Irene rents out on Manhattan's Upper East Side. (Irene asked that her full name not be used.)

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The Salt
2:50 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Reality Check: To Burn Off A Soda, You'll Have To Run 50 Minutes

Would you think twice about that 20-ounce soda if you were informed that it would take 5 miles of walking — or 50 minutes of running — to burn it off?
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 6:32 am

As a society, we don't pay much attention to nutrition information when we eat out.

A U.S. Department of Agriculture report estimates just 8 percent of Americans use nutritional information when deciding what to order.

But that could change soon.

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Shots - Health News
2:47 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Women Can Freeze Their Eggs For The Future, But At A Cost

A doctor uses a microscrope to view a human egg during in vitro fertilization (IVF), which is used to fertilize eggs that have been frozen.
Mauro Fermariello ScienceSource

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 3:35 pm

Until recently, freezing a woman's eggs was reserved mainly for young women facing infertility as a result of cancer treatments like chemotherapy.

But recent advances in technology have made freezing eggs easier and more successful, and likely have a lot to do with the recent decisions by Facebook and Apple to offer female employees a health benefit worth up to $20,000 to freeze their eggs.

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Movie Reviews
2:19 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Beauty And Loss In 'The Tale Of Princess Kaguya'

The Tale of Princess Kaguya.
Hatake Jimusho GNDHDDTK/Gkids

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 6:48 am

My first encounter with the lovely 10th-century Japanese folktale The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter was in the Sesame Street special Big Bird Goes to Japan. A kind and beautiful young woman named Kaguya-hime appears out of nowhere to take the Yellow One and his canine pal Barkley on a jaunt to Kyoto. They have fun, and then the mysteriously sad woman reveals that she is royalty in civilian dress and must return to her home on the moon. Bird and Barkley were marginally less inconsolable than were my toddler daughter and I.

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Movie Reviews
2:19 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Beauty And Loss In 'The Tale Of Princess Kaguya'

The Tale of Princess Kaguya.
Hatake Jimusho GNDHDDTK/Gkids

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 6:48 am

My first encounter with the lovely 10th-century Japanese folktale The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter was in the Sesame Street special Big Bird Goes to Japan. A kind and beautiful young woman named Kaguya-hime appears out of nowhere to take the Yellow One and his canine pal Barkley on a jaunt to Kyoto. They have fun, and then the mysteriously sad woman reveals that she is royalty in civilian dress and must return to her home on the moon. Bird and Barkley were marginally less inconsolable than were my toddler daughter and I.

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Planet Money
1:30 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Spreadsheets, Ex-Cons And A Karate Studio: Life At The Bottom Of The Debt Business

"They'd get the debt. They'd get people on the phone. They'd start dialing, and start collecting."
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 6:36 am

A few years back, James Nelms opened his own debt collection business. He didn't have a fancy resume, or much money. He was an ex-con whose siblings staked him $10,000 to get his business up and running.

This isn't as odd as it may seem. Many debt collection agencies are small businesses, eking out a living in storefront shops. A few years back, when the world was going wild for debt, lots of people were getting into the business. All that debt meant lots of money to be collected.

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The Two-Way
1:11 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

WATCH: Florida's Gubernatorial Debate Gets Off To A Bizarre Start

Former Florida Governor and Democratic candidate for Governor Charlie Crist during a televised debate with Republican Florida Governor Rick Scott at Broward College on Wednesday.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 1:07 pm

"What just happened?"

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The Salt
1:09 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Do We Need A New 'Environmental Impact' Label For Beef?

Researchers say there's plenty the beef industry can do to use less land and water and emit fewer greenhouse gas emissions. But producers may need to charge a premium to make those changes.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 1:49 pm

If you've got decisions to make at the meat counter (or at a burger joint) and want to do right by the environment, you have a couple of options.

You could skip the beef entirely, which is what some environmental groups say you should do. Or you could go for meat with a "grass-fed" or "organic" label.

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Planet Money
12:55 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

The Most Common Jobs For The Rich, Middle Class And Poor

Quoctrung Bui/NPR

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 1:38 pm

We've written a lot about how income has changed (or not) for the rich, middle class and poor in the U.S. We've written much less about what the rich, middle class and poor actually do for work.

To remedy that, we made this graph. It shows the 10 most popular jobs in each income bracket. Click on each job to see where it appears in different income brackets.

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NPR Story
12:54 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Three Ohio Schools Close Over Ebola Fears

A sign marks the entrance to Cleveland Hopkins Airport on October 15, 2014 in Cleveland, Ohio. Recently diagnosed Ebola patient, health care worker Amber Vinson, traveled on Frontier Airlines from Dallas to Cleveland with a low fever on October 10, and returned to Dallas on October 13. (Michael Francis McElroy/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 12:51 pm

Officials in Cleveland are tracking down those who may have come into contact with Amber Joy Vinson, the second Dallas nurse to be diagnosed with Ebola.

Vinson flew on a Frontier Airlines flight from Cleveland to Dallas on Monday while she was running a 99.5 degree fever. Vinson had told CDC officials that she had a fever, but they cleared her for flying.

Three schools have been closed. A school in Akron was closed becasue a parent had direct contact with Vinson. The school her child attends has been closed.

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Movie Interviews
12:54 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

'Dear White People' Is A Satire Addressed To Everyone

Tessa Thompson plays Samantha (Sam) White, host of a campus radio show called Dear White People.
Roadside Attractions

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 11:36 am

The new film Dear White People is a satire about race relations and racial identity, set on a fictional Ivy League campus. Samantha White, known as Sam, is the host of a campus radio show called Dear White People and she makes all kinds of kinds of funny, intentionally provocative statements aimed at subtle and overt racism, on and off campus.

Those statements were developed over time by director Justin Simien. Simien says he wanted to test out the humor on the world at large — and refine White's character — before finalizing his screenplay.

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